In the lead up to the 40th anniversary of original Ironman event, the worlds best triathletes have been congregating on the big island of Hawaii. Along with some of the best athletes, it will be an exhibition of the best tri bikes – including a number of new models launched for just this occasion. It would seem that Specialized is joining in on the speed fest with a new bike of their own – the new S-Works Shiv Disc.

Specialized S-Works Shiv Disc arrives in Kona w/ faster design, & massive storage

A far cry from the carbon Transition they launched in 2008 or the first generation Shiv in 2011, the new Shiv Disc strikes quite the profile. In 2018 and beyond, designing triathlon bikes means finding a way to not only make the bikes faster, but also to integrate more storage. We’ve heard it before – if you start with a fast bike, but then have to tape or strap a bunch of crap to it to make it through the ride, you’re losing out on performance.

To address those needs, the new Shiv includes two different Fuelcells with one for hydration and one for bars, chews, or gels. Specialized states that their athletes wanted a way to be able to carry enough hydration and food to bypass the aid stations for the first half of the bike leg. To allow that, the Shiv features a massive 1.5L/50oz storage tank that mounts behind the seat tube. From there, a hose routes up front and appears to be internally routed until it pokes out by the aero bars for fast, integrated hydration.

Of course, the Fuelcell is also shaped to improve aerodynamics so you get your water and get a faster bike at the same time.

Specialized S-Works Shiv Disc arrives in Kona w/ faster design, & massive storage

Specialized S-Works Shiv Disc arrives in Kona w/ faster design, & massive storage

For your solid (or gel) fuel, there is a nutrition Fuelcell in the downtube which will fit 4-5 bars, 5-6 packs of chews, or 10-12 gels. The Fuelcell can also be removed so you can store a flat kit in the downtube, below the Fuelcell. Additionally, bosses on the seat tube and top tube allow for additional storage options to fine tune your set up, carry extra bottles, etc.

Specialized S-Works Shiv Disc arrives in Kona w/ faster design, & massive storageSpecialized S-Works Shiv Disc arrives in Kona w/ faster design, & massive storageSpecialized S-Works Shiv Disc arrives in Kona w/ faster design, & massive storage

Up front, Specialized states that the bike was optimized for Kona since it’s the biggest race of the year, so the new Shiv is designed to perform exceptionally well in the crosswinds the Island is known for. The result is a pretty interesting fork with legs that extend all the way up to the top of the head tube and a base bar that is integrated into the fork.

That base bar has a pretty nifty trick in that it offers three different positions without affecting aerodynamics. And when you’re ready to travel with the bike, loosening five bolts will allow them to drop to the side of the fork legs for easy packing. On race day, simply tighten those same bolts and your fit is perfectly preserved. In total, there is 115mm of pad stack adjustment and plenty of pad reach adjustment to complement the Retül-driven fit with four sizes available to fit a wide range of riders. The aerobars also use the industry standard 22.2mm extensions to allow for customization of your fit.

Specialized claims that the resulting bike is almost a minute faster than the fastest 2011 Shiv setup possible. But compare it to the average Shiv set up (without the Fuelcell, Slammed bars, cleanest cable routing, and BTA bottle), and the new Shiv is several minutes faster around the Kona course.

Of course, the Shiv Disc will rely on disc brakes with flat mount calipers front and rear – which is part of what allows for the clever fork design. We know for sure that the S-works Shiv Disc is Di2 compatible, and would assume that it’s also compatible with mechanical drivetrains, though full details of the build options have yet to be released.

The initial run of S-Works Shiv Disc models will be limited to just 500 individually numbered bikes which include custom travel cases – and a price tag of $14,000. Minus the six bikes that will make their Kona debut under Specialized pro athletes, the rest of the bikes will be available for pre-order until October 31st and can be reserved on the Specialized site. And by reserved, they mean you, the rider, can pre-order it directly, but with delivery likely going to your local Big S dealer in about five months.

Specialized.com

32 COMMENTS

  1. Is this a fully tri-specific frameset, or can we expect to see a version of this frame sans crazy fork and storage as a Shiv TT later on?

  2. “We know for sure that the S-works Shiv Disc is Di2 compatible, and would assume that it’s also compatible with mechanical drivetrains…”

    The new Venge is not compatible with mechanical drive trains and it will likely sell several times the number of units as this will. I would bet they haven’t accommodated mechanical drive trains on this.

  3. I almost hate to say it, but this is a significantly better looking Tri bike than the last version; or the newest offerings from most of the competitors as well!…Looking forward to seeing what they have up their sleeves for a new TT version of the Shiv as well!

    • Was going to argue this but then I googled the previous shiv tri and oh my God I’m going to need to seek therapy after seeing that thing.

  4. First thing I did after looking at the first image was to look at the date this article was published to make sure it wasn’t April Fools.

  5. Hopefully a UCI bike is on its way. I had the Shiv TT(thankfully I didn’t have to pay for it) for the 2015 season. I was happy to sell it. That bike was long in the tooth then. And it was never priced to sell. S-Works only and it was a very heavy frame.

    • Very long-in-the-tooth. Fabian rode it to World Title in 2009 (with a nose cone). That said this bike is still very fast for being 9 years old.

  6. I love that there is a demand and a market for this stuff and I get to see pics and read about it, I’m just amazed they keep making and selling these things, at least enough to make the money necessary to keep doing it. How many $8K Tri specific bikes can you sell? Obviously more than I realize. Great for the bike makers.

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