When it comes to the new 2019 Specialized Stumpjumper, there are a lot of options. Just look at how long the name is – it has to be that long because there are that many configurations. When it came time to get in a bike for a review, I had the opportunity to not only try the new platform, but also a new build option. The Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 29 12 speed checks in as the least expensive option for the new carbon Stumpjumper with a 1×12 drivetrain. Which is to say it seems like a pretty great starting point if you’re considering the new Stumpy but can’t afford the top levels.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

Most importantly with this or any Stumpjumper above it, you’re getting the all new 2019 Sidearm chassis with a FACT 11m full carbon chassis front and rear. Not only does this mean a stiffer frame with a better connection from the rear to the front of the bike than previous models, but you’re also getting a frame with improved cable routing, SWAT, improved geometry, and more. Not to mention, if you pick the Gloss Chameleon/Hyper color way, you get a bike that changes color from blue to purple depending on the light. Honestly, I wasn’t sure how much I’d like the Chameleon paint, but after seeing it in person, I love it – and it seems almost everyone who sees it agrees.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

I haven’t had to mess with it since the bike comes pre-built, but the cable routing on this bike is just as magical as the frame we demonstrated on while in Ainsa. Just push the housing through the front, and it pops out the back – no fussing to get it through tight spots in the frame or from the main triangle to the chainstays. Initial impressions also seem to indicate that it keeps it completely silent and free or rattles.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

The Sidearm design helps connect the suspension linkage mounting points for better suspension performance, but the design also gets rid of any proprietary mounting hardware for the shock. That means that should you want to upgrade the Fox Float DPS Performance shock at some point, most 210 x 50mm shocks will fit.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

Matching the rear, the front features a Fox Float Rhythm 34 fork with a Grip damper set at 150mm of travel with a 51mm offset. The standard Stumpjumper (or LT for Long Travel) features 150mm/140mm of travel front/rear. This same build is also available in ST or Short Travel which decreases the travel to 130mm/120mm front/rear with 29″ wheels. The same bikes are also available with 27.5″ wheels for even more options.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

The 29″ version that I’m riding includes 29 x 2.6″ Specialized Butcher/Purgatory tires, both in the lightweight 2Bliss ready Grid casings. The bike is shipped with tubes installed, but tubeless valves are included in the box and the tubeless rim strips are on the rims, so all you have to do it pull the tubes, install the valves, add your own sealant and you’ve got a tubeless set up out of the box.

The tires are mounted to Roval Traverse 29 aluminum rims which have a 30mm inner width, and are built to Specialized Boost 28h hubs with DT Swiss spokes.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

As the model name would imply, this build includes a SRAM NX Eagle 12 speed drivetrain complete with a 170mm NX Dub crankset and threaded bottom bracket. It’s certainly not the lightest group, but so far it offers impressive performance for the price. Note that the NX Eagle cassette includes an 11-50t spread, and the crank is equipped with a steel 30t chainring.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

The NX shifter is mirrored by the SRL LE dropper lever that actuates the X-Fusion Manic 34.9 dropper post. On medium frames and above, you get a 150mm travel post, while the small sticks with 125mm. The post offers infinite travel adjust, and thanks to a low seat tube, there is plenty of room to run the full post height for my short 690mm saddle to BB height. On the higher end models, you get the Specialized Command Post which comes in 160mm – which I was also able to fit on this frame as well. On top of the post is a Body Geometry Phenom Comp saddle in 143mm width.

Even things like the Specialized Sip Grips are size specific – the S/M frames get the regular thickness, while the L/XL frames get the XL thickness grips. Details like these are a nice touch.

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Slowing the bike down are a pair of SRAM Guide R brakes with a huge 200mm rotor up front and 180mm rotor out back. The cockpit is a pretty basic aluminum Specialized Trail bar that measures 780mm wide, with an 8-degree backsweep, 6-degree upsweep, 27mm rise, and 31.8mm clamp. The matching stem is a 6° rise and 50mm length.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

Of course, it wouldn’t be a new Stumpjumper without the SWAT door. For 2019 the SWAT system has been improved by removing the plastic bezel and offering 20% more space inside the downtube.

Even at this price point, the Stumpjumper includes an impressive amount of extras including the Zee Cage II with the EMT Cage Mount multi-tool, and the tube and pump wraps. It doesn’t include a pump, but it does include two spare tubes if you convert to tubeless! On my bike I’m currently running a full size 29er tube in the tube wrap, an MTB pump, chain tool, Dynaplug pill, and spare chain link – all inside the downtube.

The Stumpjumper also includes a set of basic but functional flat pedals, a sag meter (small black plastic square that’s labeled with a few different Specialized bikes), multiple frame protection stickers, and a surprisingly comprehensive User Manual. More companies should include this with their bikes as it includes all of the torque values, shock sizes, maximum tire and chainring sizes, instructions for servicing suspension, installing cables, setting suspension, and even providing part numbers for replacement parts. Sure, you can probably find most of this info on a company’s website, but having it in one place for quick reference is far more convenient.

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

Just In: Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 12 speed LT 29er

As mentioned, I’m on the medium frame which came in at just over 31lbs set up tubeless, and without anything in the SWAT box, but with the bottle cage and multi tool installed. The Stumpjumper Comp Carbon 29 12 Speed sells for $4,520, and is available now.

specialized.com

19 COMMENTS

        • Says JCL. He’s also on MTBR.com forums passing off opinion as fact. If it isn’t good for him, then Specialized is wrong and it isn’t good for anyone else.

          My favorite is when he passes off geometry that doesn’t suit his riding style as incorrect. I guess humans come in only one shape and size: JCL!

          • There is zero data that proves that a 175mm crank length provides any power or efficiency benefit over 170mm or 165mm. Yet with BB’s getting lower, ground clearance is at a premium for most. Not to mention having your feet 10mm closer together gives the rider more ability to move their body around and it decreases strain on the rearward leg on extended descents.

            BTW Specialized is wrong about sizing/geo on the above bike but they know it, which is why they make the Evo. They know the average rider isn’t going to get close to the potential of a bike like the Evo so they make the bike for the masses to feel entertaining at dentist speeds.

            • I’m sure you are heartfelt in your opinions. A couple counterpoints –
              slowing down cadence absolutely pays dividends in controlling power output in supertechnical rock garden climbs. If you want the power with slower cadence, you either push harder, or get a longer lever. And since you may be maxed on push, longer crank gets it done. As for the dentists riding at pedestrian speeds, yeah, they have to show up to work on Monday morning. As a former young wild man, I’ve come to appreciate coming out of the woods uninjured.

  1. Wow, somebody noticed my manual! I put a lot of effort into it, I’m glad you appreciated it, and thank you for actually calling it out as an added bonus.

    • Gui – a proper manual is very much appreciated! I’m always disappointed when I open a typical manual that is comprised of legal disclaimers and a few pages of instructions on how to put air in the tires, and nothing else. Unique values like torque specs and recommended fork/shock pressures are very difficult to find on bikes that are not the current model. Please advocate for more relevant documentation with more bikes across the line. Thank you.

  2. Kudos to Specialized for not putting a bill board logo on the frame. It nice when bicycles companies let their engineering and design departments do the talking instead of the marketing department.

  3. +1 on that awesome manual. Websites and URLs get moved or deleted, especially when new models come out, so having a physical copy of all your bike’s info is more important than ever. The manual won’t be anywhere close to the top of the list for why you buy a bike, but this manual will save you hours of headaches throughout the life of the bike.

  4. Would love to know how you think this bike performs as I’m currently looking at purchasing this exact model, but am unable to demo it.

    • Hey Scott, so far, I’m really liking the bike. It’s pretty good right out of the box, though the suspension holds it back a bit. I rode it at the launch in the Expert and S-Works levels, both of which had better suspension components and understandably rode better. However, that’s getting pretty nit-picky with compression settings (or lack thereof) and such, and for the price, you’re getting a pretty good value. The flip side of that is that this frame is so good, it serves as a great platform if you want to make future suspension improvements – I just added a full Cane Creek set up and it is so plush and controlled, it’s like a new bike. Granted, the same high end suspension from Fox or RockShox would likely be just as good in their own ways. I’m loving the geometry, features, and ride otherwise.

What do you think?

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