On the eve of another Paris-Roubax, Pinarello takes the electronic eDSS suspension debuted on the Dogma K8s to the next level, with an all-new carbon road race bike featuring the HiRide suspension fork we discovered last spring. Together, the Pinarello Dogma FS gets front & rear DSAS as the first smart, electronically-actuated full-suspension system for road bikes. Theoretically always open and active when needed, then locked out on smooth tarmac, Team Sky has been testing the new Dogma FS and is set to give it a race debut this weekend on the brutal cobbles rolling into Roubaix.

Pinarello Dogma FS electronic, full-suspension carbon road bike

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike
all images courtesy Pinarello

It has been four years since Pinarello first raced the lightweight, rear-suspended Dogma K8s. Two years ago it finally added the more hi-tech with HiRide eDSS electronic auto damping controls for consumers, but now adding in an electronically controlled suspension fork it is the new Dogma Smart Adaptive System (DSAS) that takes over automated suspension control, front & rear. We detailed the fork concept & its prototype application last spring in discussions with HiRide directly, but now Pinarello makes it real (and commercially available) in the new Dogma FS.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

It isn’t the first full-suspension road bike to be raced on the cobbles of Roubaix, but it will be the first to be automatically, electronically actuated, promising that Sky riders will always be in the perfect suspension setting based on live updated damping settings controlled by a number of frame & fork sensors.

Fausto Pinarello thinks of the new Dogma FS as “the perfect combination between the best road frame on the market today and the best electronic technology at the service of a bicycle” for a race like Paris-Roubaix where bike control and the bike itself can be the deciding factor for a top rider’s victory or defeat.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

The idea behind the full-suspension Dogma is obvious, maintain Pinarello’s pro road race winning handling on the smooth sections of road, then seamlessly add comfort & control on the roughest section of pavé. Riders stay fresher longer, they maintain better control on the most technical secteurs, and don’t have to remember to open or close the suspension in the heat of the racing.

The new Dogma FS can be controlled directly by the rider opening or locking out the suspension, or left to fully automatic controls.

Dogma FS Suspension tech details

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

The new full-suspension road bike uses a fork almost exactly as we saw from HiRide last spring, although interestingly Pinarello & Team Sky have opted to stick with rim brakes still for the time being. Pinarello says the 20mm travel suspension fork features less rake for smoother telescopic fork travel. The frame also needed a wider & shorter headtube to fit the electronic front suspension, and needed to be reinforced to handle the additional loading, now using a 1.25″ upper headset bearing, together with a 1.5″ lower bearing.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

The DSAS fork is based on an internal metal coil spring, together with an electronically controlled hydraulic damping media that can almost instantaneously be changed from fully active to fully locked-out by the system’s sensors & CPU.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

The flexing chain & seatstays carry over from the K10s placing the HiRide rear shock in place of the monostay for 10mm of rear wheel travel. The rear shock is based on an internal elastomer, again with a electro-hydraulic system that can be quickly opened or locked-out.

The Smart Battery Pack inside the frame’s seattube acts as the CPU, processing inputs from the on-board accelerometers’ & gyroscopes’ data streams with its own suspension control algorithms. That let’s the CPU identify & react to various road conditions, and also based on speed, independently open & lock each suspension component in sequence.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

A rider interface with status LEDs also allows the cyclists to move between manual & automatic modes to manually lock or unlock, or even alter the threshold at which the suspension actuates.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

The HiRide suspension also includes Bluetooth LE &ANT+ communication that lets the suspension be controlled and monitored via smartphone app. Its collected data can be analyzed, settings fine tuned, it can even connect to a Garmin head unit with a Garmin Connect app for system status update & basic controls.

Conventional tech details

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

The new Dogma FS for the time being sticks with a direct-mount rim brakes, although we have to suspect a disc brake version is also in development based on imagery HiRide gave us a year ago. The bike uses T1100 Torayca carbon with Pinarello’s 1K Dream Carbon weave and Nanoalloy tech resins. The frame uses classic Pinarello curving & asymmetric aero tube shapes, with aero transition around the suspension in the fork. The Onda suspension fork gets Pinarello curved styling, and the aero ForkFlap tips at the QR axles.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

The Dogma FS features internal cable routing, an oversized downtube E-link port that fits a Di2 controller & the new DSAS controller, an Italian threaded bottom bracket, and an aero seatpost with rear-facing 3-bolt TripleForce seat clamp. The frame fits two standard bottle cages, with a two-position downtube mount to optimize aerodynamics when racing with a single bottle.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike geometry

The new full-suspension race bike is available in just four frame sizes (53, 55, 56 & 57.5cm) and has a max tire clearance of 28mm. No word on retail pricing, but the UCI approved bike is now in Pinarello’s regular 2019 product lineup, and is available through Pinarello dealers.

Full-suspension road bike, faster over Roubaix cobbles

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

Pinarello claims that electronic DSAS on the new Dogma FS is “able to absorb in average 42% of the vibration coming from the ground” resulting in a direct improvement in rider comfort, traction & control. While several companies, like Specialized with their new Roubaix, have avoided adopting more conventional suspension layouts in their endurance road race bikes citing losses in efficiency, the automatic DSAS solution ensures the suspension is only active when impacts are detected, much like in previous Lapierre E:i Auto mountain bike systems or the more recent Fox Live Valve tech.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

Those control gains were said to give the Dogma FS a 15 second advantage over the 2km section of Carrefour de l’Arbre cobbles, when Pinarello tested the bike against their comparable rigid road bike.

Pinarello Dogma FS road bike, electronic-control, full-suspension lightweight carbon road race bike

Pinarello.com

28 COMMENTS

    • Can’t lock out 35c tires to become 25c. Everyone seems to forget that the rolling resistance studies are at same pressure as skinny tires. A 35c that absorbs 20mm…gonna be slower. Wide tires are bad aerodynamically, especially on relatively narrow rims.

  1. Interested to see how the front suspension works, mainly where the coil spring sits with respect to the steerer tube and head tube.

    I imagine it’s “sleeved” over the fork steerer given how relatively compact the whole arrangement is, as well as the cited need for a larger yet more reinforced head tube.

  2. This is really cool tech and I’m excited to see where it goes. I’m worried that since this is the first “production” version, and it’s on their top end bike, that spares will be scant, and when the bike/shocks are updated, owners will be SOL. Crazy bikes like these always end up disposable over the long-term, because they’re not meant to be used past 1-2 seasons. This is the definition of halo products.

  3. Giant battery, complicated electronics everywhere, what could go wrong? How about when the system fails to lock out after the cobbles, how many seconds do you then lose on the smooth tarmac? Max tire clearance of 28mm? Rim breaks? On a wet, sloppy, Paris-Roubaix, disc brakes and 28mm- 32mm tires probably give better advantage then all this unreliable tech. A 28mm tire on a good, wide, modern rim may well measure 31-32mm. Good luck taking this bike to your LBS for suspension repairs when the electronics act up. This bike should come with a sign, NOT SUITABLE FOR CONSUMER USE.

    • I couldn’t have said it better. This is pinarellos desperate attempt to stay relevant while specialized and trek are innovating. A few will buy this bike but be sol when they need parts for repairs.

  4. With all these electronics it would be a perfect way to hide motors! Team Sky, Zoom Zoom?

    Regardless dual suspension road bikes are an odd thing, I am all for more comfort but that can easily come from a better frame with some extra flex and more importantly wider tires at a little lower pressure.

    • You know, it’s surely different, but my road and track cars both have front and rear suspension and even when on a perfectly smooth road they’re both faster with if they had a rigid ‘suspension’. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  5. Cool that this exists, but unlikely to be something I’ll ever buy, for two reasons: expensive, and a little contrary to my goals of enjoying the simplicity of riding a bike. Of course, I am getting old, and uncompetitive.

  6. The word, “Ultralight” is in the article title, but the words, “gram”, “ounce”, and “pound” are not found anywhere on this page.

    How much does all of this weigh?

    The older article only cites 470g for the combined weight of the front and rear suspension mechanisms but does not address the battery and control module(s) in the frame, or the added weight the frame had to take on to accommodate them.

    Weight concern aside, I think it’s brilliant. A properly conceived and tuned suspension for road and gravel is a game changer.

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