First introduced in 1938, the Schwinn Paramount is one of those legendary names in road cycling. Last produced as a steel bike made by Waterford, the Paramount has seen quite a few changes over the years – as you would expect from a name that’s been around for this long. But the latest version opens a completely new chapter for the Paramount that coincides with Schwinn’s 125th anniversary – carbon fiber.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Using a mid-modulus ‘N Litened’ carbon fiber construction, Schwinn claims that a raw medium Paramount frame checks in right around 1000g. Not the lightest, but also certainly not the heaviest. Especially for a frame with a tall head tube, endurance road geometry, disc brakes, and clearance for 32mm tires.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Complete bikes will come equipped with tubeless 700c x 28mm Vittoria Rubino Pro tires with Graphene 2.0 compound, but it’s nice to see the 32mm tire clearance is there if you want it. Tubeless rims, valves, and rim tape are also included with the bike, but you’ll have to set it up tubeless and add sealant yourself.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Sold in five sizes, a 72.5° head tube angle and 73.5° seat tube angle (medium) combine with 415mm chainstays.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Frame details include a PF86 DUB bottom bracket, flat mount disc brakes, and a full carbon fork with tapered steerer.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

While the frame has ports for every type of mechanical or electronic drivetrain, none of them are used for the SRAM Force AXS drivetrain so they come plugged from the factory (though you could remove the plugs if you wanted to fit a mechanical drivetrain). Brake routing is also internal through both the frame and fork.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Both front and rear axles feature the clever hidden lever we’ve seen on a few other bikes. It’s hidden when you don’t need it, and slides out when you do. Axle spacing is 12 x 100 up front and 12 x 142mm out back.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Overall, the Paramount has a smart build kit with quality parts all the way around. The bike’s product manager even spec’ed silicone bar tape with locking bar plugs because he prefers the feel.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Of course the build is highlighted by the new 12 speed SRAM Force eTap AXS wireless electronic group with a 48/35t crankset and 10-33 cassette.

Schwinn Paramount makes return as carbon endurance road bike w/ SRAM Force AXS

Overall, the Paramount looks like an impressive bike worthy of the name – that’s also not too bad on the price. Selling for $3,299 complete, Schwinn will initially only sell these direct. And through the phone. Yup – no internet orders here. To order the Paramount, you’ll have to go old school and pick up the phone to dial 1-800-SCHWINN. The company is taking pre-orders now, with bikes expected to ship by June 20th.

schwinnbikes.com

27 COMMENTS

  1. I don’t like to be a hater, but I own an early Paramount. This carbon endurance thing is no doubt a good bike, but a Paramount it is not. It just seems wrong to attach the name here.

    • I had one of the steel ones and it was great. I agree with you, it just isn’t the same. My biggest complaint is they should’ve changed the schwinn logo font. I can’t look at that font and NOT think Wal-Mart…
      At the non-profit I work at, I can decipher good/bad schwinn based on the font, and this just has that cheap look..

  2. Looks ok. I keep getting disappointed that everyone is launching new carbon but the price hasn’t come down. Not saying one way or another as to the value, but I was hoping for a more affordable option. I had the same disappointment when I saw the Viathon article, or just about any other ‘lower tier’ brand.

  3. Orders are only accepted through home phones with a rotary dial. Jokes aside, looks cool. Though I think an American-made Paramount would be more true to the name and history.

  4. I had a Paramount OS that was built at Waterford. This new “Paramount” just doesn’t seem to fit the Paramount mold given the history of those bikes. Please, Schwinn, do a real Paramount in steel or Ti, and dammit, put a threaded BB in it!

  5. Looks like Schwinn is trying to appeal to people who only remember the name and want to jump on the one quiver bike trend. Slapping the schwinn name on a mid range China frame is shameful.

  6. So I had to look up who owns Schwinn now. Pacific Cycle. Are they the company who owns Holdsworth etc? Will Paramounts be on Bikesdirect now?

  7. Surely, the last Paramount’s were made in Washington State at the Match bicycle Company in the late 90’s? I think the article is incorrect in saying that they were last made by Waterford?

    • Last steel frames were Match Cycles built (raced one of those from Cat 4 to Cat 2 once upon a time). Ti frames were built by Serotta.

      I’m with the haters on this one. The Paramount brand stood for the best American road and track racing bicycles for decades. This bike is neither, and dilutes an iconic brand.

  8. In 2016 I bought a fast back 2 from schwinn. It was a 9 speed. There’s no other Triple-butted aluminum frame on the market to compare. A matter a fact, most aluminum frames out there are double-butted. The frame is so stiff and light I refuse to get rid of it. I upgraded the entire groupset to shimano 105 5800, added 45mm deep carbon wheels with slicks and sharpened the stem angle for better aerodynamics. All I kept from the original bike is the frame. Now it’s an 11 speed. I have a couple of carbon bikes. one from Fiji the other specialized. I’m an avid rider and I can testify to this… My modified fastback 2 from schwinn can definitely keep up with my 2 carbon bikes. It’s about 1.7 to 2 lbs heavier than the carbon bikes but I don’t feel a thing. I love it because it feels and handles differently from the carbon bikes. I love the aluminum feel but now with speed.

  9. It seems like every 10 years of so someone tries to reinvent Schwinn on the premise they can capitalize on the brand recognition. Those days are over, just like nobody should start another airline called Pan-Am (people have tried).

  10. Waterford did make a Paramount in 2014. http://schwinnparamount75th.com/ I believe Waterford also had the rights to make Paramount for a few years after that.

    Schwinn has made some other Carbon Paramount’s in year past. Mostly sold at Performance Bicycle.

    Schwinn is owned by Dorel Sports. Dorel Sports own’s Cannondale, Schwinn, Mongoose, Iron Horse, Roadmaster, Pacific, Dyno, Charge Bikes, and Caloi.

  11. Given that the groupset including cranks rotors runs roughly $2K and the wheelset for $300-$400, you’re getting a decent open mold frame for $800-$900 with a warranty that doesn’t require return shipping to Shenzen-not a bad deal at all.

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