Berlin bike producer Standert is a firm believer in developing performance metal road bikes for everyday riding & racing. Their latest Kreissäge Disc bike blends the light & stiff performance of Scandium alloy, now with disc brakes and more tire clearance, to add to its modern race geometry & detailing. Handmade in Italy, the new disc brake road race bike comes together with Standert’s new Project Compact geometry developed to give small riders the same top-level performance & handling that taller riders are accustomed to…

Standert Kreissäge Disc alloy disc brake road race bike

Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bike
photos courtesy Standert

The second generation of Standert’s premium alloy road race bike, the Kreissäge Disc now adds flat mount disc brakes, 12mm thru-axles, and a premium Scandium tubeset. Standert doesn’t necessarily think that disc brakes need to replace rim brakes on modern road bikes, but it is undeniable that discs have some additional benefit for braking in poor conditions, and in freeing up space for slightly bigger tires.

Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bike

But don’t call this an all-road bike, the Scandium race bike was developed for those looking for a light, efficient, and quick handling race bike constructed from the best performing alloys. The Kreissäge Disc retains a race-oriented focus, and expands tire clearance just to 28mm rubber. “Fun is Fast” is the mantra of the new bike.
Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bike

The Kreissäge Disc features oversized tubing, a mixed inset headtube for Standert’s full carbon tapered steerer fork. The frame is built & painted by hand in Italy, from seamless Dedacciai Aegis Scandium tubing.

Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bikeThe frame features a T47 threaded BB, and the framesets even come with a Shimano or SRAM ready bottom bracket pre-installed, plus an Acros headset, an alloy seat clamp, and the 12mm thru-axles. The bike uses a 27.2mm seatpost.

The Scandium frame has a claimed weight of 1360g (56cm), plus 350g for the carbon fork.

Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bike

The frame features mostly external, conventional downtube routing for mechanical drivetrains, although it does route the rear brake inside the downtube, and includes internal Di2 routing. The bike is designed to run a 2x drivetrain with a 31.8mm band clamp front derailleur around the round seattube, but of course you could build it up with a road 1x as well.

Kreissäge Disc geometry

Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bike

The alloy Kreissäge Disc is available in six stock sizes from 48-60cm, using the same race-oriented geometry developed on the rim brake bike last year. The Kreissäge comes in three color schemes – the orange/black/white Team Edition, black/gray Charcoal, and yellow/white/orange Supersonic.

Pricing & availability

Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bike
The scandium alloy Kreissäge Disc can be bought as a frameset to build up as you like for 1200€.
Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bikeOr two different complete bike builds are also available – with mechanical shift SRAM Force 22 for 3500€, or wireless electronic SRAM Force eTap AXS 2×12 for 4400€ (all prices including EU VAT).

Standert Kreissäge Disc, Kreissaege Disc, Kreissage Disc, scandium aluminum alloy disc brake road race bike

The race-ready disc brake road bike is available now from the Berlin-based shop, and can be shipped within Europe for another 50€ or 150€ globally (plus free frameset shipping in the EU.)

Rim brake Kreissäge alloy disc brake road race bike

Standert Kreissäge, Kreissaege, Kreissage, scandium aluminum alloy road race bike, complete

The Scandium Kreissäge is also available in a rim brake model that was refreshed last summer for those looking for a more conventional road race setup, in the same colors and pricing.

Standert Project Compact, bringing performance to smaller riders

As to their Project Compact small bike sizing overhaul, Standert started with the development of their second generation alloy Kreissäge bikes to take a more detailed look at how their three smallest frame sizes 48, 50 & 52cm would alter their geometry to deliver more similar handling characteristics & higher performance.

Working with a team of test riders, Standert essentially settled on steeper seat angles, slightly taller headtubes, lower bottom brackets, and even shorter chainstays for their smallest frames.

The general theory they proved on the road, was that getting riders a bit further forward into the traditional ‘frame reach’ lent more balanced weight and better control for small riders, and a position that allowed the rider to be more comfortable both on the hoods and in the drops for more relaxed posture.

The new Project Compact geometry is now available on Standert’s two latest models – the scandium rim brake Kreissaege & the disc brake Kreissaege disc – in the three smallest 48, 50 & 52cm sizes. Project Compact will be steadily rolled out to all of Standert’s other steel & alloy bikes as they each get updated.

Standert.de

14 COMMENTS

  1. How much do the frames weigh?

    The tubing is ~92% aluminum with 0.10% to 0.15% Scandium

    So my steel bike has more carbon in it than these aluminum frame have scandium in them… so should I call my steel bike a “carbon” bike?

    • I assume you’re kidding right? Or should I rename you “water”? No one is confused about what is a “scandium” bike.

      • If no one is confused about what is a “scandium” bike is, why is [BikeRumor] refer[r]ing to it as a scandium bike? It’s a[n] aluminum alloy frame with 0.10% to 0.15% scandium.

        • We at Bikerumor refer to Scandium aluminum alloy bikes as Scandium because that is how the tubeset provider Dedacciai specifically refers to the material. And it also continues to be the cycling industry standard for referring to this particular alloy, which many cyclists & frame builders appreciate for its advanced light & stiff characteristics.

          As to your question of claimed frame weight, it is been included above in the original article.

          • If a company started calling their helmets “brain cradles”, would you follow their lead, and start referring to them as brain cradles instead of helmets? The tubing is scandium-doped aluminum alloy. Referring to it as scandium tubing is marketing.

            Anyway, a Cannondale CAAD12 frame is about 15% lighter than this Stadert frame even though the Cannondale 6069 tubing is not scandium-doped.

            (The composition of 6069 is 0.85% Si, 0.25% Fe, 0.70% Cu, 1.35% Mg, 0.20% Cr, and 0.15% V)

            • ” Referring to it as scandium tubing is marketing” what part of that dont you get? What so a ford focus wont make me see better, lying bastar@s

  2. I would love a disk frame and fork, with thru-axles, and with rim brake hole too. I would love a rim brake frame with thru-axle actually.

  3. Around 2000-2002, the scandium Merckx Tam SC was the hot bike to ride. I owned and raced one, then bought another after it was discontinued when carbon took over the industry, I still think that bike (and scandium tubing) is as good as carbon or any other material. Glad to see someone still using scandium.

  4. One small detail that I’d prefer is an actual tapered head tube. Those giant straight head tubes are an eyesore IMO

  5. I red the article to see what they want for Sc frame, as I have some few hundred sets sitting around, what nobody wants to buy.
    But then I saw the video, saying compact, so I watched Bastian explaining his idea. Short People? well, that’s done by Dan Empfield from, what 1986, in his Quintana Roo company, what was triggered by his wife 148cm height, and Julianne White could crank some pedals really fast, Dan’s whole thing brought 650c wheels in to the account.
    I used 650c wheels on thousands of designs, for almost anybody shorter than 5′, and was mandatory for TT bike (clipon stack on HT)
    Now, after 30 years this guy Bastian, is discovering that water is wet?!? Okiedokie, let see his “theory”, I go to the Video #2.
    HollySchmolly, what bunch of BS.
    Why, why someone discredit himself so much?
    Some of points:
    – Seat Angle has nothing to do if you are tall or short
    – Head Tube Length is product of your other sizes, it is fixed, cant’ be decided just because
    – Shortening CS bike become more controllable? What??????
    – Pushing the rider forward = use longer stem?????? Stem Length is product of your Torso, Arm, Bottom Arm, Palm Length
    – Pushing the rider forward shortens TT so rider is more compact, but the bike wheelbase is longer, eventhough CS are also shorter????? What kind of Head Angle you have 45 degrees?

    Why I write this? I am pissed, on someone who doesn’t have basics and thinks that can educate others. Basicaly more people will suffer on the bike and stay away from them.
    Sad story. I don’t wish them luck.

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