Rotor’s latest hydraulic shifting 13-speed groupset might not be only for road, gravel & mountain bikes soon. In a week’s time Ironman Worlds descend on Kona again, and Rotor is prepping with several triathletes who will race their latest INspider integrated powermeter & Aero Oval chainrings. But a side note lurking in the Kona lead-up suggests extending that further – possibly to 1×13 – in a collaboration with Ventum bikes & Profile cockpits.

Rotor Triathlete Aero 1×13 project with Ventum & Profile Designs

Rotor Triathlete Aero 1x13 project, Ironman Triathlon World Championship Kona TT/Tri hydraulic shift, power meter project with Ventum bikes, Profile Designs cockpit
all photos courtesy of Rotor

For the time being we have just a few strategically blurred drivetrain photos that focus in on the Rotor Flow alloy cranks attached to the new INspider integrated power meter and its solid Aero Oval single chainring. We’re also not sure who, if any of Rotor’s athletes will compete on the new Triathlete Aero 1×13 groupset, although the group being shown on an Orbea somewhat rules them all out due to other bike sponsors.

Rotor Triathlete Aero 1x13 project, Ironman Triathlon World Championship Kona TT/Tri hydraulic shift, power meter project with Ventum bikes, Profile Designs cockpit

Looking deeper into the blur, we can definitively pick out the distinctive shiny silver flat outside edge of the Rotor 1×13 b-knuckle and the similar finish on the outer parallelogram link. Plus, there is the characteristic oversized barrel adjuster and thin, but smoothly looped hose of Rotor’s hydraulic shift lines (notably, most all of Rotor-sponsored triathletes raced on Di2 last year, which can be easily differentiated, even in blurry photos.)

Rotor Triathlete Aero 1x13 project, Ironman Triathlon World Championship Kona TT/Tri hydraulic shift, power meter project with Ventum bikes, Profile Designs cockpit

What else we know is that Rotor plans to debut some still-secret triathlon-focused “concepts for a new way of understanding speed, endurance, precision and biomechanics” at the event. The project is a partnership with Kona bike sponsor Ventum (who also sponsors Rotor triathlete Lesley Smith) and aero cockpit component maker Profile Design, that could see sleek new integration of Rotor’s hydraulic shifting system in a race-ready tri bike.

Rotor says of the project, “We believe we have created something special so the world’s elite endurance athletes can benefit from the highest accuracy in measurement of power and shifting, advanced aerodynamics and fine-tuned ergonomics to maintain the best performance for the maximum possible time.

RotorBike.com

6 COMMENTS

  1. 1×13 would be great for a TT bike, but only if the also launch a new cassette or two. The current 13-cog cassettes go no tighter than 10-36, which is unnecessarily broad for my needs. I’d want at most a 10-33, preferably a 10-30.

    • Shouldn’t be using a 10t at all. For tri and tt especially, it should start at 12 and go bigger on the ring(s). Efficiency matters big time. For that reason, I’d need to see some pretty strong aero improvement figures on 1x vs 2x, and then crunch some math to see if the aero outweighs the drivetrain friction increase.

  2. Tri and TT bikes are ridiculous… everyone can just ride a standard road bike and the playing field would be level. Use of aero bars makes the bikes more difficult to control, ask Chris Froome. 1x drivetrains… are stupid… Gee, let me think… do I want closer ratios in the back? Yes, of course… Can I get that with a front derailleurs? Yes… Does a front derailleurs have a weight and aero cost? Yes, but both are so small you can’t measure it unless you are selling a 1x drivetrain and then you can. Cyclists have lost their minds. Oh wait… we are talking about triathletes… Ok, now I get it.

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