The Cipollini name is surely cemented in the road racing sphere, and the brash & aero pro-level RB1K The One aero road bike is a shining example of that. But Super Mario is up for some mixed-surface gravel racing now too, with the custom MCM program adding the MCM Allroad – a new Cipollini gravel bike!

Cipollini “Made-in-Italy” carbon bikes

Cipollini RB1K The One premium carbon road race bike frameset

When we think about MCipollini bikes it’s hard to separate the flamboyant road racer from his eponymous brand. (Even though the bikes just have Cipollini written on the downtube, the real logo adds three stripes at the front which are the M for Mario in the official MCipollini brand name.)

Cipollini RB1K The One premium carbon road race bike frameset

But while this premium RB1K The One that we saw raced in last year’s Giro it the kind of angular rim brake bike we expect to see from Cipollini, they’ve definitely moved towards more modern everyday bikes with the MCipollini Custom Made MCM line of disc brake equipped endurance road bikes.

Designed in Italy, then laid up in carbon at a Cipo factory in Bosnia, the bikes come back to Italy for paint and enough finishing work to call them “Made-in-Italy”.

Cipollini MCM Allroad carbon mixed-surface road & gravel bike

Cipollini MCM custom-made gran fondo endurance carbon road bike frameset

Cipollini moving the Allroad into something of a do-it-all road & gravel bike isn’t all that surprising after the original debut of the MCM a year and a half ago. Touting the custom-made, versatile nature of the tube-to-tube bike, Cipollini said they could build it as an endurance gran fondo bike or with more aggressive geometry as a dedicated race bike.

So why not take it bit off-road as well…

MCM Allroad Tech details

Cipollini-MCM Allroad, carbon mixed-surface gravel bike all-road bike frameset

Now, with that frameset as the base, Cipollini slightly stretches (10mm longer chainstays) & widens out (14mm more tire clearance) the MCM Allroad to fit big enough 700c tires to ride any road… whether paved, dirt, or gravel. As you would expect this is still very much a fast-rolling, endurance road-inspired gravel bike, so no giant 650B tires.

Official max tire clearance is just 42mm, but Cipollini specs all of the complete builds with 40mm rubber to be on the safe side.

Cipollini-MCM Allroad, carbon mixed-surface gravel bike all-road bike frameset

The bike carries over much of the same bonded tube-to-tube MCM tech, but upgrades to higher-spec, high modulus T1000 carbon for the MCM Allroad with a the same 1K weave finish. The Allroad uses the same 12mm thru-axles, flat mount disc brakes, full-carbon BB86 bottom bracket, machined alloy dropout hardware, and includes modular cable routing for mechanical or electronic groupsets and road double or 1x drivetrains with a chain catcher.

Cipollini-MCM Allroad, carbon mixed-surface gravel bike all-road bike frameset

It also gets a similarly shaped Aero fork with a tapered 1.5″ to 1.25″ steerer, smoothly integrating in to the downtube, but with extra tire clearance. Like the MCM, the Allroad also uses the proprietary Cipollini teardrop seatpost with an internal wedge-style clamp.

Cipollini-MCM Allroad, carbon mixed-surface gravel bike all-road bike frameset

Claimed frame weight for a medium Allroad is 1180g, plus 380g for the fork. The Allroad is offered in five stock sizes (XS-XL) and come in two finishes: matte Totally Naked with white logos, or matte Green Army with window decals to show the carbon below.

Cipollini-MCM Allroad, carbon mixed-surface gravel bike all-road bike frameset

The carbon MCM Allroad is available alone as a frameset for 3750-4000€ (depending on the market) or in several complete bike builds starting at around 5700-6500€ with SRAM Force 1x, then climbing up with Shimano Ultegra, Dura-Ace & Di2 builds topping out under 10k.

3 COMMENTS

  1. The MCM Allroad looks quite nice, but…
    1. The front-centre distance is way too short for large tires.
    2. I use cranks with 30 mm spindles. BB86 doesn’t play nice with those.

    • I use Easton EC90 cranks with a BB86 on my Scott Addict Gravel. I’ve used both the Easton and Rotor bottom brackets with no issues.

      • It seems that you just confirmed to the world that you wore out one set of those tiny bearings already. 30 mm spindles crammed in 37 mm OD bearings is not a good idea. Period.

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