There is no denying the fact that modern mountain bike drivetrains are really good. Thanks to the wide range cassettes and clutched derailleurs, 1x drivetrains have become the most common set up. But they can also be quite expensive. Not to mention requiring new freehub designs to make it all work.

Microshift Advent X 10 speed drivetrain offers 11-48t range that's lighter than XT

That’s why the new microSHIFT Advent X group might be very appealing for a number of riders. Not only does it offer high end wide range 1x performance on a budget, it doesn’t require any new standards to use.

Microshift Advent X 10 speed drivetrain offers 11-48t range that's lighter than XT Microshift Advent X 10 speed drivetrain offers 11-48t range that's lighter than XT

Microshift Advent X 10 speed drivetrain offers 11-48t range that's lighter than XT

The 10 speed Advent X cassette has an 11-48t spread and features mostly steel cogs, but with alloy used for the two largest cogs and the carrier. That makes it lighter than most of the competing cassettes with 50 or 51t cogs. More importantly, it uses the standard Shimano HG freehub body meaning that if you have an older bike, you can upgrade your drivetrain without changing anything.

Microshift Advent X 10 speed drivetrain offers 11-48t range that's lighter than XT

Moving the chain through that cassette is the RD-M6205AM rear derailleur.

Microshift Advent X 10 speed drivetrain offers 11-48t range that's lighter than XT

The derailleur has a rebuildable clutch with an on/off switch at the knuckle. The proprietary clutch system is a bit different though as it uses a ratchet and pawl mechanism to control unwanted derailleur movement.

Microshift Advent X 10 speed drivetrain offers 11-48t range that's lighter than XT

Up front, the SL-M9605-R shifter moves up and down through the gears. The shifter appears to use thumb/thumb actuation with two separate paddles, both with silicone traction pads. Note that this shifter is not compatible with Shimano or SRAM derailleurs, only the Advent X rear derailleur.

Microshift Advent X 10 speed drivetrain offers 11-48t range that's lighter than XT

In total, the group comes out lighter than Shimano XT or SRAM GX. However, both those groups have slightly wider ranges, so it’s not a completely fair comparison.

But still, the group is respectably light and very affordable. Pricing is said to be just under $167 for everything in the highest end configuration. That includes the cassette at $64.99, derailleur at $71.99, and the shifter at $29.99. The group is available now through your local MicroSpline dealer.

microshift.com

 

21 COMMENTS

  1. I’m sold. Any company that serves up a group on a silver platter with champagne deserves my business. Fantastic marketing. Love it.

  2. It’d be great to see Advent paired with a set of long-pull drop-bar brake levers. Either for mechanical disc or for V-brakes. Retrofitting wide-range 1×9 or 1×10 onto 90s steel MTBs (with short reach, tall stems and flared drops) would make gravel a little cheaper and more accessible to those of us with limited budgets. .

    Barring that, an advent barcon would be excellent!

  3. You can find brand new SLX 12 speed shift sets (chain, casette, shifter, rear derailleur) from the usual suspects for about $140. Though market to crack.

  4. I’ve been using the 9 speed Advent group on my drop bar mtb, set-up was easy and it works great. It does have pretty big jumps between gears but that’s a minor inconvenience if you consider the low price.

      • I call BS. The engineering is already available. Do you think that every time Sram, Shimano, Box, Campy, etc come up with a new derailleur or cog set that they spend millions in new engineering?
        As far materials go, sure it would be a small amount more. For $20 more retail, the 1 or two extra gears would be totally worth it.
        As far as compatibility is concerned , who cares? they could have easily made it compatible with either Sram or Shimano….or not and they would be fine.

        I don’t know, but these newer 8,9,10 speed groups just don’t make sense to me.

        • I can agree with you on the first paragraph, although Shimano or SRAM compatibility would be nice- and very easily achieved.
          However, I think that adding an extra gear or two brings little to no benefit, at least on MTBs. On road bikes, sure- you want to be able to fine-tune your cadence to your conditions, but on mountain bikes, I don’t see that as a major benefit, you’re forever changing cadence, standing up, sitting down, getting interrupted by bumps, etc. 10 seems like an acceptable number of gears to me, and perhaps a gimmick to get people to buy. After all, let’s face, SLX M7100 costs about the same and because of Hyperglide+, probably shifts better.

    • There is a longer discussion on PinkBike and basically it comes down to two reasons: 1) the weight/price would have suffered or 2) the standards for 11/12 speed aren’t so standard. When I saw this, my first thought was, “Goodness, someone just made the perfect fat bike setup.”

  5. But, when you add in cost of a new rear hub, as you would most likely need for the driver, Advent pulls ahead.

  6. Not if you live in a country that Shimano and Sram have geo-blocked you cant. Snd add in the price of a micro spline wheel to your sum.

  7. I have the 9 speed Microshift Advent on a road bike running 11-40 rear and 46×36 front. I like that Microshift makes 9 to 11 speed groups with both 1x and 2x RD and shifter options that include trigger shifters, thumb shifters, Bar cons and brifters.

    • In a thread on Pinkbike, Gus at Microshift says there is a an Advent X-specific drop bar brifter that is available now through shops. However, it is not yet available through Microshift’s website.

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