Always looking for ways to make bicycle service a little easier, Park Tool just released three interesting new service items. All three will most likely be appreciated by the professional mechanic, but even well equipped home service areas could benefit from at least one of the three.

Park Tool makes service smarter w/ Dummy Fork Tool, Electric Shift Tool, and reuseable overhaul mat

You know all of those times where you’re working on a bike and you have to remove the fork – which leaves the handlebar and stem, front brake, and headset pieces dangling from the bike, or falling to the shop floor? While most pros have a way to secure the bars so they’re not left flailing under the bike, the new DF-1 Dummy Fork looks like an interesting product. Essentially a mock 1 1/8″ steerer tube with a 2″ tapered cone to work with most headset styles, the DF-1 will take the place of your fork and hold everything in place until you’re ready to put things back together.

Park Tool makes service smarter w/ Dummy Fork Tool, Electric Shift Tool, and reuseable overhaul mat

Park Tool makes service smarter w/ Dummy Fork Tool, Electric Shift Tool, and reuseable overhaul mat

The Dummy Fork will work with most type of bikes, but it’s only compatible with threadless stems for 1 1/8″ steerers (will not work with 1″, 1 1/4″, or 1.5″ threadless stems, or threaded stems). The DF-1 also includes M5, M6, and pass through holes so that you can attach disc brake calipers and most rim brakes. This will keep them from dangling as well, plus the positioning might be useful when bleeding disc brakes. In order to keep those hydraulic brakes from accidentally closing, the DF-1 includes a pad spacer attached by a chain.

The DF-1 is nickel plated and powder coated for durability, and will sell for $43.95.

Park Tool makes service smarter w/ Dummy Fork Tool, Electric Shift Tool, and reuseable overhaul mat

If you’re removing the fork completely, then you may be preparing to do some fork service. For me, that has usually meant laying out a blue, absorbent pad to lay the suspension components on top of while you’re working on them. I look at it as a way of keeping the parts clean and protected from the dirty bench top, and the blue background provides helpful contrast when organizing small parts.

Park Tool makes service smarter w/ Dummy Fork Tool, Electric Shift Tool, and reuseable overhaul mat

The Park OM-2 Benchtop Overhaul Mat is made for that exact purpose, but it’s washable and reusable and could be a good addition to your work space. Made from TPR (thermoplastic rubber), the mat is tear, shock, and abrasion resistant and measures 15″ x 24.5″. Interlocking edges allow you to connect multiple mats if you need a bigger work space, and the textured work surface with raised trays will help you organize small parts. The OM-2 will sell for $30.95.

Park Tool makes service smarter w/ Dummy Fork Tool, Electric Shift Tool, and reuseable overhaul mat

Finally, if you do a lot of Shimano Di2 and SRAM eTap service, the Park EWS-1 Electronic Shift tool puts all the needed tools in one place.

Park Tool makes service smarter w/ Dummy Fork Tool, Electric Shift Tool, and reuseable overhaul mat Park Tool makes service smarter w/ Dummy Fork Tool, Electric Shift Tool, and reuseable overhaul mat

The three-way style tool is made from a composite material to prevent damage to pricey components, and it’s meant to install/remove Shimano Di2 E-Tube wires. The third arm is a universal coin cell slot tool which will help install and remove the battery covers on SRAM eTap shifter, or anything else that runs on coin cell batteries for that matter.

The EWS-1 will sell for $11.95.

parktool.com

 

10 COMMENTS

      • A shop might want to be able to free up the workstand while the fork is off- say because it’s out for warranty or they’re waiting for replacement parts.

        Now, if they add fork blades with slots, and multiple widths and threaded holes, the front wheels could be reattached so the bike could be moved elsewhere, freeing up the workstand.

        That would just require making that bottom stamped sheet metal piece be a lot longer, and adding two extra bends (ignoring fat bike dropout widths) and some extra holes. Hopefully that wouldn’t add too much to the price, hopefully under $100, which would still be cheaper than an actual fork while being able to fit different QR and thru hole wheels.

    • It’s clear you don’t work at one then. We do lots of complex service at our shop, including suspension service, and it looks very convenient. Usually, I use an EVT fork tool, but that’s mainly because there’s been no other option. The EVT tool is not suitable for tall stacks of spacers, leaves the front end in a precarious state, and leaves you to coil the front brake. Clamping the stem back onto a steer tube is ideal and the bolt holes for a brake are a nice bonus. Looks tidy!

      The 3 way tool is nice too. A bit bigger tool means it won’t get lost in a drawer. Has Park Tool finally joined the modern age? What’s next, a carbide insert facing tool?

  1. Park Tools probably makes tools such as the Dummy Fork and the EWS because someone said wouldn’t it be easier if? Plus for $44, it looks professional and not break the bank expensive.

  2. Back in the 26er days, the forks on my XL bikes would have a ton of steerer tube. When I retired my first Fox fork, I cut off the stanchions and have about 240mm of steerer tube on the fork crown. I use the fork crown to hang it on my pegboard, and printed a top cap (https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3912264) for it which helps align it to the fork steerer in the bike. This allows me to push my version of the tool down from above and the headset parts are held in place while I swap out the fork.

    “edge” says not even a shop would use it, but I use it in my home shop every time I pull a fork. Cool to see Park offering their own version of it. Trust me, it’s definitely useful.

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