Quintana Roo’s new SRsix aero road bike fine tunes the versatile & integrated modern disc brake road bike aerodynamics of last spring’s SRfive into a lighter, more refined race bike. Slimmed-down a bit and lightened-up, the new carbon SRsix shifts more from the brand’s deep triathlon aerodynamic shaping into more of a race-ready road all-rounder…

Quintana Roo SRsix aero carbon aero road bike

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, complete
c. Quintana Roo

The new UCI-approved aero road bike from American Bicycle Group’s Quintana Roo gets a slightly slimmer silhouette, especially in its new fork, shedding grams while not sacrificing on speed vs. last year’s SRfive. Hitting a higher pricing level, the lighter & faster SRsix becomes Quintana Roo’s new benchmark for top-level road bike performance.

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, wind tunnel front

An aero bike should work as well in the real world as it does in the laboratory,” says QR’s design engineer Brad DeVaney. “With this in mind, we have developed a bike that works best for everyday athletes and enthusiasts, without compromise.

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, wind tunnel data

Developed to be real-world fast, the SRsix keeps wide tire clearance, shallower tube shaping than many aero bikes, all the integration you need, and aerodynamics designed around actually carrying water bottles. QR calls it one of the most practical aero road bikes on the market, going so far as to share wind tunnel testing that shows the SRseries bikes delivering lower drag than top Cervélo, Specialized & Canyon aero road bikes when cyclists simply ride with two water bottles on their bikes.

Check out the full wind tunnel report data & protocols here.

Aero road – Tech details

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, complete angled

The new Quintana Roo SRsix gets a lightweight carbon frame with a claimed weight of 995g (medium) including hanger, bottle bolts & frame inserts, paired to a 425g full carbon tapered steerer fork. That’s down two hundred and forty grams from last year’s SRfive debut (1175g/485g).

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, geometry

The UCI-approved QR SRsix bike is available in five stock sizes (XS-XL) race-inspired all-rounder road geometry.

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, details

Frame & fork both get clearance for up to 700 x 32mm tires on modern wheels to maximize comfort & control. The QR SRsix frame includes fully internal cable routing to work with either mechanical or electronic shift, hydraulic disc brake groupsets via the modular FSA ACR headset system. The frame features a T47 threaded bottom bracket, a proprietary aero seatpost (0 7 20mm offset available) with hidden wedge-style clamp, flat mount disc brakes, and 12mm thru-axles.

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, paint color options

Manufactured in Asia, but painted in ABG’s Chattanooga, TN factory, Quintana Roo offers the lightweight SRsix in a dozen colors & seven decal options so each buyer gets some customization. And it includes QR’s lifetime warranty.

Quintana Roo SRsix – Pricing, options & availability

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, complete

Multiple builds are available, starting at $5650 complete with a mechanical Shimano Ultegra groupset and alloy DT Swiss E1800 wheels (discounted now to start from $5084). Build customization options include one-piece Vision cockpits and Rotor power meter cranks. And you can go all the way up to the top-spec $10,950 build with Dura-Ace Di2 and carbon Zipp 404 NSW tubeless wheels.

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, frameset

A $3250 SR six frameset option is also available, marked down now to $2924.

Quintana Roo SRsix aero road bike, lightweight carbon aero road race bike, riding

The new bike is available now consumer-direct from Quintana Roo in the US, or by special order via their global retailers. The SRsix is delivered 90% assembled out of the box, or Quintana Roo’s premium Home.Delivery.Right option can have it dropped off, ready to ride.

QuintanaRooTri.com

11 COMMENTS

  1. I forgot – here we are, yet again with a bike in a wind tunnel in-line with no rider…..oooooohhhhh…as if this is Science.

  2. Unfortunately there is something wrong with the wind tunnel data. Reading the test report, the test procedure appears fine and legitimate for a bike-alone test, but the aero drag numbers are simply wrong for the published 30mph (48km/h) speed. Also I can’t agree with these published yaw graphs for each of these bikes either, having tested them all (except this new Quintana Roo).
    -Having developed and tested a large number of these aero bikes in CFD, the GST wind tunnel in Germany and measured the performance out on the road as well, we have a lot of data @swissside. The base drag (at 0° yaw – wind from straight ahead), should be around 86W @30mph (including two bottles – positioned on down tube and seat tube). And all of the aero bikes in this test can be expected to have a drag level well within 5W of each other at 0° yaw.
    Furthermore, these competitor bikes have also been wind tunnel tested and that data published by other independent media like Tour Magazin Germany. The data published here is simply wrong.
    @quintananaroo please check your data!

    • Great comment. Thank you for something scientific other that “just” an opinion. Did you guys ever tested the SR5 or looked at the numbers released by QR?

      I have one (SR5) but honestly bikes at a certain price point (and i believe that in most cases this is equivalent to quality) will feel the same for us amateurs. Then the components also have a huge influence on “ride feel”. My SR5 is equipped with a Vision ACR 5D integrated cockpit and with a praxisworks BB (threaded)… huuuuge diference from my previous bike (same price point).

  3. Wind tunnel data is meaningless when it comes to the amount of drag a bicycle FRAME creates (wheels are different). Why? 2 reasons.

    1. Bicycle speeds are so slow that when combined with reasons 2 & 3 make the amount of drag a bicycle frame creates so small and hard to measure that it is meaningless.

    2. No wind tunnel can replicate the “mixed” air that occurs in the real world. There is almost always 2 wind directions when you ride outside, a headwind from rider moving the bike and another wind from nature. There is also a mixing of the air from rider movements such as pedaling and from the wheels spinning. If you ride in a group the complexity of measuring drag becomes impossible with all the variables involved.
    There is no wind tunnel that replicates this.

    If you race time trials at over 25mph then some thought should go into the aerodynamics of the bike/rider package. For road riding and racing, manufacturers should be concentrating on other aspects of frame design as the “aeroness” of a frame makes no difference in real world use. None.

    Find an aerodynamic engineer and ask them.

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