Well over a year since we originally set eyes on it, Thomson have named and made available their titanium gravel frameset; the Piedmont. Named after the Piedmont plateau near the Appalachian Mountains, this titanium frame is built with a geometry that would serve gravel riders in the region well, with tire clearance up to 44c and a carbon fork.

Thomson Piedmont Titanium Gravel Build Kit

thomson piedmont ttanium gravel bike bikepacking

As with the titanium Hooch Hardtail mountain bike, the Piedmont Gravel bike is sold as a frameset only. For $3,295, you get the base level build kit with Thomson’s own elite series stem, seat post, clamp, alloy bar, and carbon fork. Though, many riders will want to take advantage of the exclusive discount Thomson are offering on their premium components with the sale of the frameset.

thomson piedmont headtube titanium frame tig welded
The Piedmont titanium gravel frame gets a brushed finish with sandblasted logos and a custom head tube badge

The Thomson Piedmont is fabricated in Taiwan from 3al 2.5v aircraft grade titanium, serving up a 70° head tube and 74° seat tube angle. A tapered 1 1/8 to 1.5 internal head set supports Thomson’s 45mm rake carbon fork with a 395mm axle-to-crown measurement.

thomson piedmont titanium gravel bike 700c x 44c tire clearance
The Piedmont runs a 12mm thru-ale and flat mount brakes

The titanium frameset is available in five stock sizes from XS-XL with reach spanning a 374mm to 410mm range. Standard 12mm x 142mm rear end spacing and 428mm chainstays give rise to sufficient clearance for 700c x 44c tires; see the bike here with Vredestein’s 44mm gravel tire.

thomson piedmont downtube internal cable routing bottle bosses

Like the Hooch MTB, the Piedmont Gravel Bike runs internal cable routing through the front triangle, with the rear mech cable and rear brake hose guided externally along the chainstays. The front triangle can accommodate two full size water bottles within the downtube, with a spare set of bosses on the top tube providing purchase for a small pack or other accessories.

thomson piedmont rack fender mounts

Rear rack and fender mounts finish off the frame as an adventure-ready bikepacking companion.

Pricing & Availability

Pick up the Thomson Piedmont Titanium Gravel Bike frameset with carbon fork and elite series finishing kit for $3,295, shipping now.

BikeThomson.com

21 COMMENTS

  1. It’s a 142×12 rear not 148 like you have listed. Also wish they would have added mounts to the fork blades. I think in this day and age that is a huge miss for a gravel bike.

    • Not the first time someone conflated gravel with adventure, and it won’t be the last. The fact that their fork doesn’t come with eyelets doesn’t matter as most people don’t load their bikes past two bottle cages on the frame. There are many bikes in the gavel category that don’t have eyelets on the forks. At the same rate there are many that do. Just be thankful we have plenty of options.

      • Where I live it’s easy to do 80 mile gravel loops with zero services. I don’t like wearing a hydration vest so yeah it’s nice to carry two extra bottles on the fork.

        Your needs are different than mine. No need to be so condescending.

        • How did this all of a sudden become all about you? You are not the norm my friend. Most people don’t do 80mi in zero services, that’s why there’s a lot of gravel forks out on the market with no eyelets. How is making blanket statements about how forks should be just because of how you ride remotely productive? At any rate you have plenty of options. How was that missed?

  2. Nice enough bike, but seems kind of pricey for what is, and not everyone will want all the included components. Contrast, for example, with a Chumba Terlingua, which can be had with an Enve fork and some customization choices like finish and additional mounting points for about $3k.

    • We have two Lynskeys in our family and know a few folks who also own them: they are fine bikes but I don’t know anyone (myself included) who hasn’t experienced some major customer service f_ck up on Lynsey’s end in getting a bike from them (wrong fork or parts in the box, missing parts, specs on website incorrect, etc.) and the quality is just ok – a few of the braze-ons on my road bike are burned through from what I presume was too hot a torch; it’s only cosmetic AFAIK but still… Additionally, another guy I know had to send his bike back to Lynskey twice for cracks that formed at the BB on the seat tube. I’ll bet Thomson’s customer service is competent and that the frames are actually made at least as well as Lynskeys but probably better.

      • I’ve also had serious issues with Lynskey, mostly in bottom bracket shells so far out of tolerance it’s amazing a bottom bracket ever managed to get stuffed in there in the first place.

  3. Not sure why you would buy any of these over a Framed Basswood @ $1200 with a carbon fork. Oh yeah that’s right, the label on the side is all that really matters. Forgot I was in the bike industry.

  4. Cool that Thomson has released this. A solid, long-term industry paragon, IMO.

    As noted above, they need to add an optional fork with cargo mounts.

    • Sure it looks cool, but I find it funny that their cable inlet fittings and flat mount pieces are all catalog items. I’ve seen them on multiple different frames out of Taiwan.

  5. Completely missed the point laid out in plain english. You are not the norm. Most people don’t need the extra provisions, and is the very reason why there are many forks dubbed gravel that don’t have the eyelets. Relax Francis, there are plenty of forks out there that fit your needs.

    • K-Pop,
      There used to be this commenter on here who went by the name Kernel Fliketov (not sure I got the spelling correct). Your commenting “style” reminds me of him.

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