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3T flips their iconic bullhorns around for new Revo aerobar

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Revo-Team_aerobar-side

3T pretty much created the modern aerobar with the bullhorn that they developed for Francesco Moser’s 1984 World Hour Record ride. In the 30 years since, the industry has strapped all manner of aero extension on top but mostly kept the bull horn shape in place. Now 3T has taken a closer look at the base bar that they pioneered and flipped it around with the new Revo line. By putting the wing of the bar in front of the grips,almost like a super flattened drop bar, riders get a more secure position while still maximizing aerodynamics. Get a better hold on the new design after the jump…

Revo-LTD_aerobar-top Revo-Team_aerobar-profile

3T’s new Revo was developed and tested with BMC Racing, the reigning trade team world time trial champions. The new base bar design eliminates the risk of your hands sliding forwards off the grips, which makes it possible to keep a relaxed grip to maintain control and handling on technical descents, rough road surfaces, and when sprinting.

The base bar also gets a more aerodynamic shape than a typical bullhorn, with a UCI approved 3:1 wing with internal routing for mechanical and electronic controls.

Revo-LTD_aerobar-3-4 Revo-Team_aerobar-3-4

The Revo is available in two levels. The 650£ high modulus Revo LTD weighs in between 700-830g depending on the stack height of the carbon extension setup. The Team version uses a more basic carbon and alloy extensions, selling for 490£ in the red graphic version, or 10£ more for the stealth finish and weighs 770-900g.

The base bar comes in one 40cm c-c width, with a 31.8mm clamping area. Modular aluminum risers, adjustable neoprene forearm pads, and s-bend extensions give a good bit of flexible fit with either wide or narrow placement.

3TCycling.com

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9 Comments
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Mike B.
Mike B.
6 years ago

Same question I put on FB; where do the brake levers go? I can’t see anywhere on these new cowhorns where you’d be able to clamp them.

Alvis
Alvis
6 years ago
Reply to  Mike B.

You are going to need thumbs 8 inches long if you want to use Di2 TT levers! Looks like they didn’t think that one through. Tested with BMC eh?

Davide
Davide
6 years ago
Reply to  Alvis

I think you can just flip the controls so you can reach it with your forefinger. Just a matter of routing it in the right way.

Tomi
Tomi
6 years ago

@Mike B: Same as in other aero handlebar. They clamp inside the holes at the front of the horns.

shafty
shafty
6 years ago

@Alvis Seems like alloy would have been a better choice for that very reason. AT least then you’d have only to reach past small tube.

Mario
Mario
6 years ago

So after 32 years are they finally admitting they got those Moser bars wrong 🙂

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago

I’ve tried it…works great with the Shimano and Sram TT levers I tested it with at the shop

alvis
alvis
6 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

Really? Embargoed press release till 02/04 and you’ve tried it already in a shop. So how do you get to the shift buttons on Di2 TT levers? or do you have 8 inch thumbs?

carlos carrasco
carlos carrasco
5 years ago

there is a option for that. placing the buttons individualy closer to the thumbs. You are right anyway!

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