2016 Trek Emonda ALR 6 lightweight alloy race road bike with Ultegra

When Trek announced their Emonda carbon road bike line, they backed up their “world’s lightest” claims with an impressive frame and fork and an even more impressive 10.25lb (4.6kg) complete bike. Now, they’re adding an alloy Emonda ALR option that’s also lightweight yet far more affordable.

To earn the Emonda badge, the frame uses their top-level 300-series Alpha Aluminum that’s been hydroformed into size specific tubes, then welded together using a no-see technique that produces smooth joints that use less material to save weight.

The process is called Invisible Weld Technology, which they say produces stronger, stiffer welds despite using less material. Video, pics and more details below…

2016 Trek Emonda ALR 6 lightweight alloy race road bike with Ultegra

Trek told us the unpainted frame is 1050g (56), and a painted fork is 358g w/240mm steerer.

Like the ultralight Emonda carbon models, the ALR uses their H2 race geometry, E2 tapered headtube (standard 1-1/8″ to 1-1/2″) and wide Pressfit BB 86.5, meaning this bike is made to go fast. Other frame details include a braze-on front derailleur mount (no need to add a clamp if you’re getting the frameset) and external cable routing.

2016 Trek Emonda ALR 6 lightweight alloy race road bike with Ultegra

We’ve requested a more technical description of the welding process (update as we get it), but the frame is only part of the story. The complete bikes come equipped with built-in extras like the a Blendr stem with integrated light/computer mount, and it has Duotrap S compatibility (their ANT+/Bluetooth 4.0 speed/cadence sensor, sold separately for about $60).

You also get a complete group, so the Emonda ALR 6 with Ultregra gets a full Ultegra group from chain to brakes to cassette and everything else. There are no mis-matched parts or down spec’d bits to cut costs. A full carbon fiber tapered fork completes the package.

2016 Trek Emonda ALR 6 lightweight alloy race road bike with Ultegra

The Emonda ALR will initially come in two builds, the “6” with full Ultegra, Bontrager Race tubeless ready wheels with R2 tires, and a Bontrager cockpit with alloy short reach/drop bar and carbon seatpost for $2,249.99. Our local Trek Bike Store says complete bike weight is claimed at 17.25lb (7.82kg).

2016-Trek-Emonda-ALR-alloy-lightweight-race-road-bike-6 2016 Trek Emonda ALR 5 lightweight alloy race road bike with Shimano 105

The Emonda ALR 5 drops down to a full Shimano 105 group with non-series Bontrager tubeless ready alloy wheels, R1 tires and a full alloy Bontrager cockpit for $1,759.99. Claimed weight is 18.77lb (8.51kg), colors will be the gloss black/hi-viz yellow and blue shown here, plus a racing red coming soon.

2016 Trek Emonda ALR lightweight alloy race road bike frameset with carbon fiber fork

The frameset shares the same paint scheme as the “6” and comes with an FSA sealed cartridge bearing headset for $989.99. The frames have a lifetime warranty carrying a 275lb rider weight limit.

Just for fun, here’s the companion lifestyle video.

All three models shown here are available now and should hit stores soon. Our sources tell us there’ll also be an Emonda ALR 5 with Tiagra, an ALR 8 with Dura-Ace mechanical and ALR 9 with Dura-Ace Di2 coming soon. That last model suggests they’ll have an electronic-only frame, too, since these first models only have external cable routing. At the very top, in terms of light weight anyway, will be the ALR 10 with a full SRAM Red group.

TrekBikes.com

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Scoobie
Scoobie
6 years ago

looks like a rebadged Allez

pfs
pfs
6 years ago

The invisible welding looks a lot like what pretty much every other company calls smooth welding. And has been using for years. You weld the tube normally then go back over it without filler material and “reweld” it. The process smooths out the weld and helps it wet out. REVOLUTIONARY TREK!!!

Robert W
Robert W
6 years ago

Interesting that they are using hydroformed tubes but didn’t choose the aero tube shapes of the Madone design.

ElPablo
ElPablo
6 years ago

@Robert W – my sources say the Madone is on the way out. & if the story is about weight vs. areo it would make sense to mimick the emonda shapes. Also, the 2 series aluminum frames are already Madone-esqe.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

I always find it funny that companies state how they’ve extensively optimized tube shapes for their flagship carbon fiber bikes, but then seemingly can successfully apply those shapes to materials with very different properties. There is a little marketing lie in their somewhere.

Anyway. Glad to see these Al bikes. CF has been getting too pricey fort me.

Ck
Ck
6 years ago

I like how they quote an unpainted frame weight, then only offer it in a painted variety. But lets also make sure we pair that unpainted weight with a painted fork weight.

Durianrider
Durianrider
6 years ago

Looks legit. Seeing they are coming out of the Giant factory why not put on the overdrive 2 fork and stem and really take it next level?

Greg
Greg
6 years ago

Aluminum, how quaint.

Roy
Roy
6 years ago

Why not sell them unpainted if they weight them unpainted? JBikes if I read you right what your saying is the shapes have far mo9re to do with design than engineering.all thes tube shapes are probaly coming from kitchen appliance design firm and they bs riders who rarely go over 20mph that aero is worth buying a new bike for

Colin M
6 years ago

That Bontrager cycling kit is pretty damn nice. “Understated” as the hipsters like to say.

Colin
Colin
6 years ago

How about US made aluminum, with giant tubes, some internal routing, and some really funky paint jobs. Oh wait…

JB4605
JB4605
6 years ago

Hasn”t specialized already been doing this for like 3 years now? And better welded joints? Revolutionary-nothing is more like it, just another slightly modified copy frame.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

Roy – no I was just commenting on the fact it’s stated how non aero tube shapes are optimized for carbon fiber for whatever properties (stiffness, weight, ride) but then a vastly different material can achieve the same with the same tube shapes? I’m sure they vary material thickness and such, but given the vast difference in CF and Al, I’d think tube shapes would vary more between the two materials, unless the CF and Al frames ride completely different.

Andrew
Andrew
6 years ago

Jesus, tough crowd. Lightweight aluminum, full component groups and small price tags… Sounds good to me.

MikeC
MikeC
6 years ago

Full Ultegra! Well… except the wheels. Of which, the Bontrager Race spec is a few notches below Ultegra…

djbutcher13
djbutcher13
6 years ago

y’all are haters. you can pick on the marketing and on random bits and pieces but in the end this is the bike you’re going to start seeing at all the local crits and races. So they have weird marketing, worry about the bike and what it can do for you.

JC
JC
6 years ago

Aluminum is the new carbon.

josh
josh
6 years ago

Yeah a bunch of haters here, Go buy a Specialized because they are not owned by the big man, Oh wait, Specialized is own by a conglomerate, and Trek is family owned. Seems like most people don’t understand the definition of “the man” Don’t hate on them just because you don’t like it that more people ride Trek than any other brand in the US.

Ronin
Ronin
6 years ago

@Durianrider, you’re killing me! Lol

Ventruck
Ventruck
6 years ago

When you think about it, it’s a bike people actually look for: Workhorse, and the no-nonsense but clean aesthetic.

Considering the Propel SLR might not come stateside, as well as the update TCR SLR before it, it’s nice to have another potential alloy option on the market that isn’t an Allez or CAAD.

Andy
Andy
6 years ago

I really like where Trek is going with their new paint schemes. Very minimal branding and no stupid racing stripes and decals. Keep it premium!

JasonK
JasonK
6 years ago

Jbikes: I understand why you’re asking about why two frames with different materials have the same tube shapes, but in fact they probably should have the same shapes.

In the bike industry (and many others), it’s common practice to design using isotropic material properties (e.g., with aluminum) for a first pass. The resulting stiffness (quantified through FEA) ensures you’re getting the most sectional modulus you can out of a given tube shape. Only then do you go back and design a laminate schedule with anisotropic materials (e.g., carbon fiber).

This allows the designer to clearly separate the modulus (stiffness) due to tube shape and the modulus due to the laminate schedule. That way, each can be optimized as a discrete step.

Except for a few corner cases, optimal frame tube shape is material-independent. Surprising but true!

Matt
Matt
6 years ago

Looks like a great bike at a good price. I love nice aluminum race bikes. But why no H1 geometry option? It irks me that companies (not just Trek) spec the really race oriented stuff at the high-end of the price scale. I know a short head tube doesn’t work for everyone but why not give us the option? What does the size of your wallet have to do with your flexibility?

Neilthemeal
Neilthemeal
6 years ago

I’m wondering if some of the frames are anodized, so unpainted weight would be pretty relevant.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

JasonK – thanks! Great info. Never really thought of it that way but it makes sense.

jaxgtr
jaxgtr
6 years ago

I like the emonda and the CrossRip frame for my commuter. I would seriously consider if I was in the market and carbon was not an option.

Craig
Craig
6 years ago

Man that’s a light frame. Nice to see they are using full groupset specs.

I wonder if the welding is a form of aluminium brazing using a lower melting temperature brazing rod. I think this is what Shimano do with the external reinforcing tabs on the aluminium rims. This is supposed to be lower strength than welding but coming up with some newer technology is not beyond Trek’s resources. Or maybe they have come up with a way to modify the pulse action of a TIG welder with a certain filler wire application. Either way, the old double pass method for aluminium is old hat now.

Most companies claim unpainted frame weights. Use this general guide: If a company says “…painted frame weight is…” then it’s including paint. If they don’t specifically say painted then you can guarantee it’s an unpainted frame weight.

The only reason I wouldn’t buy one of these is the head tube is too tall…

BeeJay
BeeJay
6 years ago

I applaud Trek for coming out with a ‘light’ and ‘inexpensive’ aluminum frameset but I’m still not sold on the H2 geometry.

Sincerely,
Worlds longest head tube.

Patrick
Patrick
6 years ago

I like the option of a high end aluminum frame as well….but this one misses the mark for me because trek refuses to make any bike with its “racer” H1 geometry that doesn’t cost at least 4,500 for a frameset. If they only would make H1 options of their emonda sl frame or this new all I’d buy one in a second. Trek already makes a million bike models….why not better fit options? Ever since they did away with the 6 series madone the options for the budget conscious racer have gone to zero. Bleh. And more seatmast length options trek!

Adam
Adam
6 years ago

Nearly the same weight as a Cannondale frame that was first manufactured out of the same material about 6 years ago

Gummee!
Gummee!
6 years ago

I think this will make a GREAT race frame.

Certainly beats trying to replace a carbon frame someone broke for you in that ‘last corner of the criterium’ crash.

ElPablo
ElPablo
6 years ago

If I see one more I’m-so-flexible-I-can-stick-my-head-up-my-ass comment about the lack of H1 geometry, I might give up trolling comments on bike rumor all together. Seriously, 5 years at a Trek dealer and we sold maybe 3 H1 bikes (all as special order). We ordered dozens more project 1 bikes in the ‘normal’ H2. Working now at a Cervelo dealer I have very few people balk at the head tube height, and MOST are running a positive angle on the stem anyways. At 6’3″ I run 14cm of bar drop. I have had zero issue getting a proper fit on stock bikes, including Trek. Currently on the newly updated (i.e. market norm) stack of the 2015 Cervelo S5 I still have 15mm of spacers under my stem. If H2 geo just doesn’t do it for you, grab a Cannonade with a low profile headset cap and go ride. They are making a bike for the largest market, obviously the budget racers this bike is designed for are too busy riding their bikes to complain on Bike Rumor…..

AJ
AJ
6 years ago

Looks like a great bike for the money and your avg rider. Nothing wrong with that. Kudos too for specing a complete group build, awesome!

mark
mark
6 years ago

Waiting for my ALR 5 to arrive!! Last bike I bought was in 1986, a Myata One Ten. Hopefully this one will last another 29 years.

mike
mike
6 years ago

uhhh… the allez actually looks good

http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/road/allez/allez-comp-race

the only thing actually missing from these frames are some colorway options like the tarmacs

internet stoke
internet stoke
6 years ago

i had a domane and the headtube was too tall.

i might get one of these. its pretty affordable all things considered.

Psi Squared
Psi Squared
6 years ago

There doesn’t seem too much, if anything at all, to complain about here. The Emonda ALR frame MSRP is right in line with a CAAD10 frame MSRP ($10 cheaper actually). It looks good, and it’s certainly not a heavyweight bike. If it rides as good as it looks, it will be a great deal.

pilf
pilf
6 years ago

@MikeC – Are you kidding? I haven’t seen anyone refer to a full groupset as including the wheel since like 1999. Some people are just desperate to find something to bitch about. The Bontrager Race wheels are great. They only weigh 200g more than the Ultegras, and unlike every Shimano wheel, they are specced completely with off-the-shelf parts that are easily purchasable in any bike shop.

@Adam – Yes, because Cannondale were the first company with an aluminum racing bike. You forget the Trek, via Klein, were making awesome lightweight aluminum race bikes when Cannondale was still welding together soda cans.

@H1 Lovers – You’re all on crack. A quarter of the Trek pros don’t even ride the H1, and I promise you that you are not that fast. I can also tick off a list of local heroes, Cat 1 and PRO dudes, who get by just fine on the H2, usually preferring it to the H1.

pilf
pilf
6 years ago

@Psi – And the Trek is clearly much better specced than the Cannondale, with an Ultegra crank and Bontrager Race wheels, not to mention a cockpit that won’t require immediate replacement.

Jdog
Jdog
6 years ago

Wait to you see the next gen cannondale frame before you jump on this..

badbikemechanic
badbikemechanic
6 years ago

I am happy this exists. Buyers beware if you crash this thing it’s probably going to dent up like tinfoil.

pilf
pilf
6 years ago

@badbikemechanic – What makes you say that? There is a generation of high end aluminum out there that holds up just fine to the rigors of daily life. I personally have an aluminum Allez that I regularly leave locked up outside of bars, the grocery store, as well as race, and it hasn’t even scratched the anodized finish yet.

Patrick
Patrick
6 years ago

As always, opinions abound….and everyone is “right.” The H1 vs. H2 debate is clearly a hotter topic than I thought. What it boils down to though is “choice.”

Trek offers the option, meaning there are people that prefer it. I rode a 60 cm H1 Madone 6 series last year, and absolutely loved it. Sadly it was a team bike and I had to give it back at the end of the year. In looking for a replacement I want a bike with similar geometry, but don’t want to spend 4,500 to have the OPTION to get the geometry I like. The head tube on the H1 is 18 cm…compared with 21 cm on the H2. That is a LARGE difference. I don’t think anyone is right or wrong to ride whatever geometry they like. All I’m saying is that for me…the H1 geometry is perfect, and I don’t need to run a -17 stem to get my preferred position of the bike. Being a pro, being fast or slow, is irrelevant. I would just like to see the option available at a reasonable price point.

Tom
Tom
6 years ago

These bikes are epic. And yes, they blow the competition out of the water.

dG
dG
6 years ago

About time Trek offers something for the Joe-Racers out there. Yes, carbon is super nice but you guess what: so is aluminum. I have a locally-made Aluminum bike and it rides *amazing*. So did my old Caad7 and I bet Specialized’s aluminum bike is also fantastic. We need more people in the sport, and to do that we need a much lower entry-level bar. if for $2,200 you get a nice Al Trek with good geometry, good wheels (i own the bontis tlr and they’re indestructible and readily serviceable), good parts and cockpit that are either race-ready or hammer-ready, then god bless Trek. For the record i own a cannondale six and it’s a phenomenal bike. but my aluminum rig is my favorite. way to go, Trek – kudos indeed.

SoClose
SoClose
6 years ago

Arguing that “some pros ride H2, therefore nobody needs H1” is well, just a poor excuse for an argument. An H1 aluminum Emonda would be a hit, and I would purchase one as soon as it were available. I’ve owned and ridden both H1/H2 models, and greatly prefer the H1. As an aside, direct mount breaks on this beast would be the icing on the cake. Think about it Trek.

zanetti
zanetti
6 years ago

This bike compared with the new caad 12 is nothing …

Eric Hansen
Eric Hansen
6 years ago

I’ve got a current model year Allez smartweld frame built up with full 105 and tubeless Shimano wheels. I certainly didn’t do it for $1760 retail, but then some parts on my bike (bars, saddle, tires) are from a very much higher trim level. I’ve also got all the accessories (cages, tools, &c) in my price, and I was unable to use the economy of scale a manufacturer can.

ANYWAY. The ride quality of my Allez is nothing short of amazing considering. It is *as smooth* as my steel 3-speed with 38mm tires over brick roads. I have no problems riding the Allez a hundred miles, though I run out of water. The Allez smartweld is making me completely re-think aluminum as a frame material, especially for amateur racer types.

These Treks seem to DIRECTLY compete with the Allez smartweld introduced last year, which is great, since it engenders competitive designs. When you get an Allez Comp (with 105), you pay less, but you miss out on the excellent 5800 brakes and crankset, and get bog standard training wheels. Moving up to an Allez Expert (with Ultegra), gets you a full groupset with carbon SL-K crank and ‘Fulcrum’ wheels at a competitive price.

I’d love to ride these Treks back to back with my Allez.

JoeD
JoeD
6 years ago

I am happy to see Trek jump into the “high end” aluminum market. I have owned & loved several iterations of CAAD’s. I have also read good things about Specialized redesigned Allez frames. I am now hearing of a redesigned CAAD12(?) to be released later this Summer…(anyone else hearing any details?) I would have liked to have seen a disc version from Trek… (Spec as well.) I believe that road disc offerings from every manufacturer will increase exponentially once the pro’s are riding them. I wanted my next road bike purchase to have discs so that I can look for second set of wheels that will be future proof…(thru-axles coming next?) I had my eye this year’s CAAD10 Rival disc, hoping the boys at Cannondale offer an Ultegra disc spec on the CAAD12 later this year. 🙂

sfields
sfields
6 years ago

Just ordered my alr 6 today! I work at a trek dealer, and I have to say H2 is usually great for 99% of our customers, and they usually have the stem flipped up. For the 1% of people that actually want that huge bar drop, you can always size down and make it look super pro with a longer stem! Nothing wrong with that!