Argonaut updates lighter, fatter, domestically sourced carbon Disc Road Bike

The carbon Disc Road Bike has been one of Argonaut’s most popular bikes since its origins under the auspices of a gravel bike back at NAHBS in 2014. Since then, disc brakes on the road have become less a compromise and more of the mainstream solution. So Argonaut have overhauled the Disc Road Bike to fit fatter tires, updated to the most current axle & brake standards, and reworked the bike’s custom layups.

New custom carbon Argonaut Disc Road Bike

Updating the Disc Road Bike required Argonaut to step back from their popular bike and see how they could reoptimize how they craft the disc brake road bike to take on any road surface. Of course with the trend of wider road tires, that was a good place to start. But they also looked at how the built each bike by hand one-at-a-time from US-sourced carbon fiber on their own proprietary tooling in their Oregon workshop. At the same time they decided to roll the bike out to a “Test Flight” series down in California where riders could try the revamped bike out.

What’s new in the Argonaut Disc Road Bike?

As component makers have caught up with riders, road disc has cemented itself with new standards. So of course the new Disc Road Bike moves over to thru-axles and flat mount disc brake calipers at both ends. It isn’t only simple 12mm axles, though. Argonaut has added new molded carbon dropouts designed for Mavic Speed Release thru-axles, front & rear.

While the bike remains fully custom in both rider-tuned layup & geometry, Argonaut has reshaped & refined their base carbon layup of the bike to better optimize it for the asymmetric loading of disc braking. They say that has helped them be more efficient in overall weight. But the bigger benefit seems a more balanced ride which allows them more ability to tailor the ride to each rider’s weight, power & riding style.

Everyone wants more tire clearance, so Argonaut covered that too. The new Disc Road Bike now has ample space for up to a 30c tire (actual measurements up to 32mm wide) with the still short 412mm chainstays.

The bike also gets new internal brake routing that also works with electronic wiring and includes an internal Di2 junction box.

Frame details & complete bike spec

The custom Road Disc Bike frame uses a T47 bottom bracket, a direct mount rear derailleur, and gets paired with a matching ENVE Road Disc fork (also with Mavic Speed Release.)

If you are looking to build a complete bike up with the custom frame, Argonaut with sell a bike with a complete Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 hydraulic groupset for $15,300. That includes a set of ENVE 3.4 disc wheels set up tubeless with Schwalbe Pro One tires, plus a ENVE carbon stem, bar, 27.2 seatpost, and a Chris King BB. Besides lightening your wallet, a 54cm frame claims a weight of just 15.7lb/7.1kg complete with pedals and bottle cages.

Argonaut Test Flight program

Now, if you want to take a spin on one before you skip a year’s worth of rent payments, the Argonaut Test Flight Program is your ticket. They are starting with events in the San Francisco area where you can test ride a bike in your size to help determine the ride character you are looking for. There will also be fitting opportunities, and a chance to sit down and discuss how Argonaut can tailored a bike to you. Reserve a slot at Argonaut’s Flight Test site.

ArgonautCycles.com

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Von Kruiser
Von Kruiser
4 years ago

Requirements for exhibiting at a handbuilt show for all categories:
1. Handbuilt… check
2. Chris King HS with external lower cup… check
3. Threaded BB… check
4. Enve everything… check
5. JBend Spokes… check
6. Painted components to match frame… check
7. Shimano components… check
All joking aside… this is a majestic steed.

James
James
4 years ago
Reply to  Von Kruiser

Hahaha, you’ve got the point, man! So true!

TYler durden
TYler durden
4 years ago
Reply to  Von Kruiser

so funny. Enve melted blob stems need to go away already.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 years ago

I’d still love a road bike that’s idealized for a 30-32 but will fit bigger. Oh, and no disc brakes. Geometry adjustments wouldn’t need to be huge, especially with new gearing.

greg
greg
4 years ago
Reply to  Veganpotter

what kind of non-disc brakes were you hoping for to fit tires bigger than 32? cantis? mini Vs?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 years ago
Reply to  greg

Ideally Vs. But there are a small number of caliper brakes that’ll work. Tektro being one of them. Not great brakes but better than cantis

greg
greg
4 years ago

the upturned bars with downturned hoods just kills me

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
4 years ago
Reply to  greg

I ain’t your bike.. I’m sure you’ll get over it.

Craig
Craig
4 years ago
Reply to  greg

Yep for $15,300 I’d expect the component assembly to be spot on. This one isn’t.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
4 years ago
Reply to  Craig

It’s a freaking custom bike, you set up your gear how you want. Commenting on how others prefer their bars and levers and stem and seat post, blah blah, blah-blah is redundant as f__ck!

Crash Bandicoot
Crash Bandicoot
4 years ago
Reply to  Craig

I forgot how much these stupid things cost. Saw a guy roll up to the start line with an argonaut and Lightweights for a cat 5 last year I just winced.

dG
dG
4 years ago
Reply to  greg

i agree with you. upturned bars with lower levers look egregious on such an amazing bike. I just wish domestic builders would go a bit flashier on the colors. Like Spooky and Vynl. If I’m spending 10K on a bike like this, i want to look wicked pretty. not drab and lame.

Android
Android
4 years ago

Already looks dated…… headset and seatpost clamp especially…….I mean what are you really getting for all that dosh? handmade? Tuned ride?……..I’m sure it’s lovely ‘n all that, but the bang to buck ratio seems very low….. the build as noted above seems so dull, safe and boring…….

Maybe I’m having a bad morning……

wally mann
4 years ago

$15-large for a bike, any bike — not just argonaut, makes me want to spit!

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
4 years ago
Reply to  wally mann

While I wouldn’t want this bike, I’d take it over a $100,000 bottle of wine

Nash
Nash
4 years ago
Reply to  wally mann

Nice bmw motorbike for that cash. It is silly money

Robin
Robin
4 years ago
Reply to  Nash

Apples and oranges.

blah blah blah
blah blah blah
4 years ago
Reply to  wally mann

true ,we (road) cyclist are getting stiffed!

Carl
Carl
4 years ago
Reply to  wally mann

I’d say same similar idea as a standard 25K-ish car vs. 1m+ supercar but really I think you’re getting more here. Custom fit, custom geometry, custom carbon layup to tune the ride–that alone is probably worth 10k…

Always fun to look at and contemplate but my no means attainable for most and of course there’s really nothing but emotion that can justify spending that kind of money. This is the kind of bike you get and ride forever.

doug
doug
4 years ago
Reply to  Carl

something tells me the people who can afford this bike won’t be riding it “forever.”

Scott Garrett
Scott Garrett
4 years ago

I’ve got one of these. Had it 2 weeks after a 16-month wait; long enough for all the new stuff in the article to make it onto my bike. I went for a eTap specific build so only two holes in the frame and a super-clean feel to it. I’ve only done about 500km so far but it felt like home from the first turn of the pedals, as it should for £11500. Is it worth it? I think it might turn out to be so… I can afford it but I suppose that ain’t the point. But if it continues to climb, descend, turn and swoop like it has on the first few rides, what price do you put on pure delight? I won’t race it until next season, but I have an inkling it’s going to work out just fine…

Matthew
Matthew
4 years ago

Buy a Tarmac S works. It is 60% of the cost and I guarantee it will ride better. You just need to be able to get over buying from one of the big guys.

Carl
Carl
4 years ago
Reply to  Matthew

How do you define “better”? It seems the idea behind this bike is that it rides EXACTLY how you want it so, assuming your fit and interview process isn’t complete crap, no stock frame could ride better than one of these.

Matt
Matt
4 years ago
Reply to  Carl

As much as we hate to admit it, so much money and testing go in to the R&D of the top three bike makers. When I say better, I mean literally it will handle better, climb better, react better, brake better, feel better and be better for your wallet. I think those that buy these bikes, which I do think are beautiful and works of craftsmanship and art, are biased in their assessment of the bike due to their cash outlay. I have owned supposedly top of the line in craftsmanship custom bikes and while they have they uniqueness, they do not compare to say a Tarmac S works. Just keeping it real.

Robin
Robin
4 years ago
Reply to  Matt

Can you provide evidence that the Tarmac S works will ride better? Consider that “ride better” is almost entirely subjective since it’s dependent on what a given rider defines as “better”. I think there’s no evidence at all that the Tarmac S would empirically ride better. It might cost less, but cost doesn’t affect ride quality or handling.

1Pro
1Pro
4 years ago

1. I do not understand the 412mm CS, out of spec according to Shimano who calls for a minimum 415mm on a 2x drive train with 135(12×142) spacing. It might be “ok” but for that jing, I want it to work and wear correctly so Shimano can’t blame it on me when my stuff wears too soon and doesn’t shift well.

2. Carbon dropouts and stays but still bolting the seat-stay? I guess that is the result of having all the actual carbon molding being done by someone else(ICE) and only grinding, gluing and painting in house?

3. That tire(you say 30mm?) looks smaller and is way too close to that FD band clamp. See #1.

For the money, this frame set is not all that well thought out. These are easy fixes but it is sad they make it to market with such basic mistakes.

tyler
4 years ago
Reply to  1Pro

yep. don’t let function & engineering get in the way of good marketing and exclusivity appeal