Home > Other Fun Stuff > Gadgets & Hacks

Ari Bike Downsizes SRAM XX1 and X01 Cassettes with 39t Replacement Cog

13
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

ari bike sram xx1 x01 39t cassette adapter (1)

After a wave of replacement cogs to give your cassette a wider range, it was bound to happen. Ari Bike is now offering replacement cogs to make your cassette range more compact. What may seem like a strange modification at first, anyone who is using a SRAM XX1 or X01 cassette for a gravel, cross, or even road bike  could stand to benefit.

According to Ari Bike, after studying the needs of these riders using 1x drivetrains for skinny tires, they found that many felt the jump from the 36 to the 42t cog was too great to be useful. So whether you’re looking to upgrade (downgrade?) your new cassette, or looking to replace your worn out 42t cog, Ari Bike has one of the only 39t options we know of…

ari bike sram xx1 x01 39t cassette adapter (4) ari bike sram xx1 x01 39t cassette adapter (3)

ari bike sram xx1 x01 39t cassette adapter (2)

Made from the same ERGAL 7075 T6 aluminum as their 40/42t replacement cogs, the 39t cog is a simple swap from the stock ring. Available in 13 colors, the cog comes in at 77g which saves a few grams over the stock 42t cog. Pricing is set at €90 with shipping available to countries outside of their Italian home.

aribike.it

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

13 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
ParisLeBon
ParisLeBon
7 years ago

Ari Bike = pure racing…. All the others just lifestyle

Eric Hansen
Eric Hansen
7 years ago

I notice they don’t have the XD logo or other trademarks anymore.

Stravarious
Stravarious
7 years ago

All those cutouts, but no bottle opener?

Sevo
Sevo
7 years ago

anyone make one for standard cassettes?

JP
JP
7 years ago

Looks like shimano were correct all along 😛

mateo
mateo
7 years ago

@JP – Shimano still can’t give you a 10T cog.

10-42: 420% (SRAM 1x)
10-39: 390% (ARI)
11-42: 382% (Shimano XT)

I would like to see SRAM offer a 10-36 or 10-38 though. I think ARI is onto something with this range for road/gravel 1x.

Eric Hansen
Eric Hansen
7 years ago

@mateo

10t cogs are still utterly irrelevant.

Marc Lindarets
7 years ago

@eric

Why? I’d rather see a 10-32 or 10-36 than an 11-35 or 11-40 (equivalent ranges). Gearing steps will be smaller, shifting smoother, and the whole setup lighter. For as often as you’re in your tallest gear, the hypothetical disadvantages of a 10t aren’t much of a concern.

shafty
shafty
7 years ago

The disadvantages aren’t hypothetical–they’re simply trivialized. The funny thing is I’m running SRAM XO1 shifter/derailleur with Shimano 11-40 cassette/chain, and the shift into the smaller sprocket is SMOOTHER than the SRAM cassettes.

The 10-32 or 10-36 will be lighter than what? There isn’t anything similar to compare that to. It only has smaller jumps compared to a 10-42 or 11-42, but larger than 11-34 or 11-36. Your argument is essentially “I like smaller sprockets, but I won’t just say it, so I’ll try to justify it”. Your argument is as hypothetical as the cassette you just dreamed up.

Larger sprockets with MORE teeth generally run smoother, with less mechanical losses, than smaller ones. If you’re true point to argue is that a more efficient system is beneficial to everyone, than I’d agree. I’d argue that Shimano and SRAM already found the sweet spot with 11-34 and 11-36 cassettes(and doubles). The new 11-40 is just slightly outside of that efficiency.

Ari is onto something here, but hopefully SRAM will buck up and make a couple more ratios.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

I’m hoping for 10-32s give or take a few teeth. That, mixed with a 40-42t chainring would be great. And yes, it’s hard to make claims on weights but if you’re talking 1x it’s much more sensible to argue this. There’s surely the friction issue with smaller gears but there’s definitely less weight and if you don’t having too long in the 12 and smaller, it’s not so bad

mateo
mateo
7 years ago

@eric – Maybe, in that there is nothing magic about a 10t cog in and of itself.

The bottom line is the gear range, and until someone wants to make an 11-46t cassette, SRAM’s 10-42 beats Shimano for gear range (and would still slightly beat an 11-46).

Marc is also correct regarding weight if nothing else. You can always make a 10-42 cassette lighter than an 11-46. You’ll also use a smaller chainring to get the same gearing, so you’d save a few grams there.

JP
JP
7 years ago

I disagree with the weight factor… an 11-46 can be machined a whole lot more to be lighter than 10-42 while still maintaining the same durability/strength

Craig
Craig
7 years ago

I’m all for larger sprockets and chainrings to decrease wear and friction but I wonder if a 46 rear sprocket were to get made, would the rear derailleur be much more prove to hitting rocks and trail debris?

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.