What once seemed like a crazy idea is now gaining traction. We’ve seen a few different magnetic pedals recently, but most have been focused on the all-terrain and MTB markets. Now, we’re starting to see concepts meant for the roadies like the new Aveta Magnetic ECT pedals.

Aveta magnetic clipless road pedals

In the looks department, the ECT pedals aren’t that far off from a Shimano SPD-SL. They have a nylon composite body with 420 stainless steel spindles and a metal plate to support the cleat and allow it to rotate through the 4-6° of float.

However, in place of the usual spring-loaded clip you’ll find strong magnets to secure the cleat into the ‘pocket’ of the pedal. That magnetic force depends on the model with the ECT Classic offering 8.5kg of pull force, and the ECT Classic Plus bumping that up to 10kg for more experienced riders.

Aveta magnetic clipless road pedal cleats 3-bolt SPD SL

The cleats are designed to fit standard 3-bolt road shoes and can be adjusted like normal. They also offer the typical TPU contact points for grip while walking around. To exit the pedal you can pull straight up, or rotate your foot out of the pedal as you would with any clipless pedal.

magnetic flat pedal adapter for road bike pedals

And for those times you want to ride your bike without your cycling shoes, each pedal set will include what Aveta calls Pedal Plates. These take the place of the cleats and magnetically attach to the pedals, providing a wide platform that’s easier to pedal with street shoes.

AVeta magnetic clipless pedals for road bikes

Aveta doesn’t provide any details on weight, but typically magnetic pedals are heavier than their clipless counterparts just due to the weight of the magnets and the steel plates. Though these might be a bit lighter thanks to the nylon composite construction.

The pedals are available now for $165 for the ECT Classic or $175 for the ECT Plus, both of which include the Pedal Plates and cleats.

aveta.us

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Ickx
Ickx
3 months ago

Oh no ! Not this sh** again ! This idea keeps comming back from time to time and then is being forgotten until someone comes up with it again. Personally, I recall 3 such concepts that disappeared into the abyss of cycling history.

Robert Paul Bateson
Robert Paul Bateson
3 months ago
Reply to  Ickx

obviously you haven’t used them.

PotbellyJoe
PotbellyJoe
3 months ago

That they continue to disappear from the market, it’s obvious many people haven’t used them.

Tony Pepperoni
Tony Pepperoni
3 months ago

I heard no one knows how magnets works

GluteusMinimus
GluteusMinimus
3 months ago

Yet another answer to a question no one asked.

Like so many better mousetraps, this too will soon fade from history.

“What once seemed like a crazy idea….” is still no less crazy.

Joseph
Joseph
3 months ago

I use the Magped pedals on road, gravel and mountain bikes. They work great! Unlimited float and you dont have to walk like the seat post is…

Jonesie
3 months ago

Nice to see more of these innovative ideas coming to the market! Magnet pedals are not new, however, the designs coming to market, along with materials being used as components are of the highest quality.

These appear (in the video) to still require a heel out twisting motion, which seems to negate the easy in/out motion that magnets can allow if designed properly. If I still have to heel twist out, then what’s the point moving from a clipless pedal to these magnet pedals? Isn’t the point of magnet pedals to increase safety by eliminating falls from not being able to get your foot out in time because you have to twist out?

8.5 and 10kg of pull force doesn’t seem like much to hold you into the pedal, especially if you want to have an effective pulling connection on the upstroke on hills or when your gunning it out of the saddle.

I transitioned from clipless to magnetic pedals about 3 years ago, and won’t ever go back. I’m not a competitive cyclist, but love to ride hard on challenging hills and really crank it out on the flats.

I use J-Pedals channeled magnetic pedals and love them!! Each pedal has about 20kg (40lbs) of pull force. 7 degrees of float. You can easily attach to the pedal on either side by just hovering over the pedal, which pulls your cleat into the channel in the same position every time. The easy out natural movement to detach mirrors the easy of stepping off a flat pedal. J-Pedals are designed to be used for any type of bike (roadie, mtb, gravel, etc…).

No more embarrassing and painful clipless falls, and no more spiked flat pedal chunks taken out of your shins and lower leg.

Robin
Robin
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonesie

That almost sounds like an honest review, almost like it’s not spam. Spiked flat pedal chunks? There’s the requisite fear-mongering to drive a sale. Painful clipless falls?Uhm, they happen far less than you think and to far few people than you’ll claim.

The J-Pedals website relies on the whole fear thing. What a trashy marketing effort.

Jonesie
3 months ago
Reply to  Robin

C’mon…no need to be nasty or make it personal. In this sport, people regularly do fall, crash, scratch/gouge their legs, many of which are caused by pedals.

I went to the Sea Otter Classic last October, and nearly all the mountain bikers had either scars or fresh scrapes on their legs. One kid had 13 stitches in his leg from a pedal tearing his leg open. Another lady had a broken collar bone from flipping over. Another guy had a radial/ulnar fracture of his distal forearm from a fall. Another had an ankle fracture from a fall. And those were just a handful of the injuries we saw. Could they have been prevented if they could have gotten out of their pedals? Dont know. Maybe. I can tell you, getting your feet out of your pedals really does help to prevent injuries. Ask anyone who got injured because they couldn’t disconnect.

I don’t work for J-Pedals, but am a definite fan of the product. After I moved from flats to clipless, I fell twice that 1st year, and had a couple of other close calls, but saw my buddies fall once in a while and they are all seasoned riders.

Fact is, cyclists crash all the time, get hit by cars, scrape up their legs, etc… Examples: I had a rider flip right in front of me 2 years ago and break hit neck and die. I did chest compressions til EMS arrived. Another friend crashed on the Climb to Kaiser and broke his leg. Another friend saw a cyclist crash and die at that same event. Another cyclist friend at another organized ride crashed on the downhill and road rashed his arm and shoulder up and got a concussion. My father in law got hit by a car while on his bike. And that’s just in the last 3 years, and only in the small cycling community I’m connected to. But maybe you’re right Robin, people don’t fall being clipped in near as often as I’ll claim.

Nearly everyone clipped in falls over at some point, and injuries can easily happen especially to those who need to get out of the pedals quickly but can’t. Flat pedals really do scratch and gouge the crap out of legs all the time. What you claim to be fear mongering to make a sale is the factual reality of the sport we all love.

Could any of these injuries, or even death, have been prevented? I don’t know. Maybe? There’s no way all cycling injuries can be prevented, but what if some of them could? If you have an idea of an invention that could help prevent injuries, why not pursue it? The guy who invented J-Pedals had that idea, pursued it, and is now selling a pretty innovative pedal.

NoneGiven
NoneGiven
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonesie

False.

Robin
Robin
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonesie

Yeah, you need credible sources. “Are clipless pedals dangerous”: complete scare tactic. “Myshopify”: that’s the best you could do?

James
James
3 months ago

Could we please start making carbon clips instead of cheap plastic in the pedals. I go through pedals like I go through lubricant. Err…umm…bike lubricant.

research
3 months ago
  • Weight per pair: 356g/pedal + 115g/cleats, 103g/flat pedal

#website