Home > Bike Types > Cyclocross

Colnago Launches G4-X For Pure Gravel Race and Cyclocross

Colnago G4-X full
5 Comments
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

Colnago is having a banner year. The company just reported sales of 55.7 million euros ($59.6 million) in 2023 and is on its second gravel bike release of 2024. It’s no secret that racing is a huge part of their success and history. After releasing the refined (and super expensive) C68 Gravel, Colnago created something for the dedicated gravel racer with a hint of cyclocross pedigree. Meet the new Colnago G4-X. 

Colnago G4-X — What is it?

Image: Colnago

The new Colnago G4-X  replaces the G3-X as Colnagos dedicated gravel and cyclocross race bike. 

What about the C68 Gravel that just came out? That’s a good question; it’s actually pretty different. The C68 is hand-assembled in-house in Italy and has a modular frame. It is more slack, with more stack, and slightly more compliant. Plus, the tire clearance is 42mm maxed out. Colnago doesn’t think of it a “race bike” (even though we did) but more of a great-riding gravel bike. 

Colnago G4-X paint
Image: Watts Dixon

The G4-X, on the other hand, is a monocoque frame made in Asia, designed specifically for racing and competition. The frame is stiffer and more aggressive (more on that later) with less rake, less stack, and fewer (none actually) mounts for bike packing. Colnago says the G4-X takes cues from the V4RS road bike (tube shape wise) than the C68.

Colnago G4-X Frame Details 

Colnago G4-X stays
Image: Watts Dixon

Colnago wants the world to see the G4-X as the gravel (and cross) companion to the V4RS. The frame is UCI-approved, and will be raced worldwide, including the European cyclocross season and world championships. 

Colnago G4-X studio
Image: Colnago

Colnago maintains tight control in manufacturing, even though the frame is crafted in Asia. They have an in-house dynamic stiffness test that is more comprehensive than the Zedler standard. It is meant to mimic the actual stresses of the rider on the bike rather than general stress.

Colnago G4-X 3rd bottle
Image: Watts Dixon

While still monocoque, the frame layup is very intentional. The drive side has a stiffer modulus where the chainstay is narrower. The same is true in various places, such as seat stays, down tubes, etc. 

Internal Cable Routing 

Colnago G4-X full
Image: Watts Dixon

The frame sees updated internal cable routing via headset and stem. Steerer-wise, the new G4-X moves to an entire 1.5 top and bottom headset over the previous 1-1/8 top and 1.5 lower. The new headset accommodates internal routing and is compatible with other manufacturers’ stem and bar combos.

Colnago G4-X rear
Image: Watts Dixon

The new G4-X frame is UDH compatible with all 1X and 2X groups. If you’re looking to “do-it-all,” the G4-X has clearance for road-size chainrings.

Utility-wise, the G4-X has a newly re-imagined seat post clamp, similar to the C68 Gravel. 

Colnago G4-X top tube
Image: Watts Dixon

If you’re looking for rack mounts, keep walking. The G4-X has zero rack or fender mounts, don’t fear – it has spots for three bottles and a top tube feedbag. 

The new Colnago GX4 boast more tire clearance than its predecessor, from 42 max on the G3-X to 45mm (with 6mm wiggle room) on the G4-X.

Colnago Bar/Stem 

Colnago G4-X studio bars

The new G4-X is available with a traditional two-piece bar and stem or an integrated Colnago CC.01 Wide one-piece bar/stem combo.

Colnago G4-X studio outside
Image: Colnago

This updated bar stem boasts a 40cm top—46cm flare. The same super comfortable ones we reviewed on the Colnago C68 Gravel are also available. 

Colnago G4-X Geometry

The G4-X has slight geo changes compared to the G3-X. The head tube is slightly steeper, with a longer reach. Size wise the Colnago G4-X comes in; 45, 48, 52, 54, and 57cm sizes.

Builds Options 

Colnago G4-X studio routing
Image: Colnago

The new G4-X will arrive in five different build options, with pricing starting at $4,750 and growing to the $9,000 mark. The builds start at 1x and 2x Shimano GRX builds around the $4,750 mark. There are three SRAM builds available with mechanical Rival at $5,250, Force AXS XPLR at $6,250 and Red eTap AXS XPLR for $9,750. No Campagnolo builds are slotted for the time being.

Weight: The Colnago G4-X with integrated bar, SRAM Red AXS build option, Zipp 303S wheels, with XT pedals weighs in at 8.4kg (18.5lbs). 

Colnago.com

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

5 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Rim Brake enjoyer
Rim Brake enjoyer
19 days ago

Paint would look so much better if they didn’t have those little graphics and instead it was just candy. Hey it’s an Itailiawanese company I’m just happy the thing isn’t plastered with acronyms and useless tech names no one cares about cough cough bianchi.

tertius_decimus
tertius_decimus
19 days ago

Hey, I heard you don’t like REPARTO CORSE RACING SUPER FLOW AERO CARBON COMPOSITE MEGA SPORT FATTO A MANO IN COMMUNIST CHINA PROUDLY PAINTED IN ITALY TECHNOLOGY?

I’m with you, buddy.

Mike
Mike
16 days ago

I agree on all those meaningless tech names Bianchi put on their frames in the past, but can’t agree about making frames single colour. Current bikes are just sooo boooring…

I miss old paintjobs – those little details, graphics, making it look more aggresive. Just look at eg. Scott Scale frames from 2011-2012, yellow Merida One-Forty from 2018, or Giant Anthem up till 2020. I own a 2014 Haibike Light RC and when I go racing, everybody in the race venue comment how good it looks.

Rim Brake enjoyer
Rim Brake enjoyer
13 days ago
Reply to  Mike

Never said make all frames only one color. I’d suggest you re-read what I wrote

FrankTheTank
FrankTheTank
18 days ago

This bike has the perfect number of attachment points for a gravel bike, race-oriented or otherwise. So many gravel bikes way over-do this, including my Niner.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.