German bikemaker Schindelhauer builds a lot of single speed and fixed gear bikes, but has been expanding into more practical internally geared bikes for the everyday bike commuter. Their newest all-rounder Gustav bolts a tough platform rack directly onto a durable alloy bike with a couple of hub gear options at a reasonable pricepoint. Now it will even add a new step-through frame option called Greta for improved standover. The also have an updated version of their Team Edition fixie crit racing Hektor, with very limited availability.

Gustav & Greta porteur urban commuter bikes

The idea behind the Gustav was to develop a comfortable, upright city bike that could still be affordable while offering everyday practicality. The first point was to make a bike that was easy to ride, whether you needed to haul heavy items or not.

Schindelhauer settled on giving the alloy bikes a wide platform porteur-style rack that bolts securely to the headtube. That lets urban commuters haul up to 15kg loads, or even remove the rack if you won’t be hauling things regularly. The fixed rack position takes a moment to get used to while riding, but with their elastic & adjustable VarioStraps, it is easy to button down all type of loads. The fixed position of the rack also does a pretty good job of not affecting the steering, keeping it easy to maneuver through the city, even at slow speeds.

Tech details

Like most of their bikes, the Gustav is built from a triple-butted, aero shaped 6061 aluminum tubeset and use Schindelhauer’s unique forged, split dropouts that include a tensioning system and open up for belt-drive compatibility.

The frame & fork also feature full fender mounts, with the bike coming set up ready-to-commute on the German roads with full-coverage fenders and neatly integrated lighting powered by the Shimano dynamo front hub.

Greta step-though variant

Even though most of their bikes get aero seattubes, the Gustav intentionally sticks with a round frame tube so users can bolt-on a child seat.

The bike is seen as a solid family performer, which is also the reason they have just added the step-though Greta frame that will be available this July to order now, with August delivery (and we’ll update with some good photos of soon) in two sizes S & M.

Complete bike builds

Spec-wise you can pick either the 1250€ SRAM Automatix 2-speed hub version or a 1450€ version with a Shimano Nexus 8-speed hub, both of which are spun up with a Gates CDN belt-drive setup and share a claimed 13.8kg total weight. Otherwise the build is the same, probably highlighted by a nice looking set of light skinwall WTB 650b x47mm Horizon tires with a thin reflective stripe. I have to say, I wouldn’t mind having this version of the tire on a gravel bike, assuming they are still TCS tubeless-ready?!

The rest of the finishing kit is paired down to keep the total price reasonable. A Gates alloy crank and Tektro Spyre mechanical disc brakes stand above a lot of Schindelhauer branded alloy cockpit components and house-brand leather saddle & grips, plus of course a twin-leg Pletscher center kickstand to hold your light cargo bike upright.

Hektor Exklusive Team Edition

OK, you might have to join the Team Schindelhauer fixed crit racing team to get on one of these special edition blue & white framesets. The bike is the same alloy track racing frameset that you can get in standard goldfish orange or storm blue though for 895€.

Schindelhauer says it was the first track frame developed for belt-drive compatibility. And their race team exclusively competes with Gates Carbon Drive builds, saying it outperforms a standard chain drive and is lower maintenance and quiet-running.

The tapered steerer aero alloy frame matches to a full carbon monocoque fork and is available only as a frameset for you to build as you wish. It features a 68mm BSA threaded bottom bracket, and integrated seatpost clamp for a 27.2mm post, and 120mm rear end spacing. The 1600g frame & 329g 690g (the heavier weight had been from an older spec with an alloy steerer) fork come predrilled for a brake, if you are going to ride it on the German roads and don’t want to get a ticket.

Schindelhauerbikes.com

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mudrock
mudrock
4 years ago

Why the German fascination with kinked top tubes? First Canyon and now this. I can see the utility of it for a cross bike, but a townie?

King County
King County
4 years ago

The video is so goofy, but the bike seems ok.

MaraudingWalrus
MaraudingWalrus
4 years ago

That Hektor is one of my all-time favorite bikes. Love their stuff. They make some clever bits, cool seatpost, some nice tools for belt drive, too.

Volsung
Volsung
4 years ago

So if you have anything tall on the rack (like in either of the bottom two pictures of that four panel picture) and you turn the handlebars you hit the cargo.

Are my German stereotypes of fine engineering wrong?

Arty
Arty
4 years ago

Like that rack idea on this and a few other bikes.

“WTB 650b x47mm Horizon tires with a thin reflective stripe. I have to say, I wouldn’t mind having this version of the tire on a gravel bike, assuming they are still TCS tubeless-ready?!”

– Oh yes. All black perhaps.

Mark
Mark
2 years ago

Best bike I have had over the last 40 years (!).