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BLUETTI Makes a Splash With All-Weather Solar Generator

BLUETTI AC60 solar generatorPhoto c. BLUETTI
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The big appeal of solar generators is the ability to source power anywhere you go. One downside is that some portable power stations aren’t designed to handle exposure to the elements.

But BLUETTI designed the AC60 to be water- and dust-resistant. The brand even launched a companion battery pack that can boost the generator’s output, and, according to the brand, it shares the same performance in the elements.

Traditionally, a solar panel (or an array of them) collects energy and stores it in a portable power station. While solar panels can withstand an afternoon shower, many generators can’t.

The AC60, however, can safely run while sitting on the beach or in fresh snow, according to BLUETTI.

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BLUETTI AC60 in snow
Photo c. BLUETTI

BLUETTI AC60 Features

  • Resists water and dust
  • Power-saving battery management system
  • Monitor status and control settings through display or app
  • Compact size
  • 6-year warranty

The AC60 is a 403Wh (lithium iron phosphate) battery that supplies 600 W of power, which can be expanded up to 2,015 Wh with add-on batteries. Its footprint measures 11.3 x 8.5 inches, and it weighs less than 19 pounds.

The generator has a water-resistance rating of IP65, which means it can withstand water jets from any angle.

The outputs include two 120V AC outlets, two USB-A ports, one USB-C port, a 12V DC outlet, and a wireless charging pad. The inputs include AC, solar, and a cigarette lighter port.

How much is 600 W of output? That’s enough to run a 60W mini fridge for five hours, charge a mobile phone 13 times, or run a lamp for more than 30 hours. Additionally, the generator can crank 1,200 W of lifting power, meaning it can run appliances like a coffeemaker or power drill for a short time.

BLUETTI made the AC60 with a fast-charge time of 45 minutes to go from zero to 80%. From there, it tops off in 1.2 hours. Conversely, a solar panel (max 200 W) can recharge the generator in three hours or less, according to the brand.

The companion app lets you control the battery’s charging and monitor its status and output levels.

Photo c. BLUETTI

Build Out More Power

The BLUETTI B80 battery pack works as a standalone power bank or an add-on to the AC60 for longer trips or power-hungry projects.

Designed as an expansion battery for the AC60, the B80 carries the same IP65 “weatherproof” rating. It also uses the same core battery to provide stable power.

A B80 battery has an 806W capacity. Linked to two B80 packs, the AC60 generator’s power storage increases from 403 to 2,015 Wh. That’s enough to power portable fridges, laptops, and mood lighting around your campsite or van setup, according to BLUETTI.

Photo c. BLUETTI

BLUETTI AC60 Specs

  • Capacity: 403 Wh (18 Ah)
  • Output: 600 W
  • Recharge: AC cable 1.2-1.7 hours (600W turbocharging); solar 2.5-3 hours
  • Operating temperature: -4 to 104 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Life cycles: 3,000-plus cycles (to 80% original capacity)
  • Dimensions (L x W x D): 11.3” x 8.5” x 9.7″
  • Weight: 18.9 lbs.
  • Price: $699 each for AC60 and B80 battery pack

All-Weather Power

BLUETTI built the AC60 solar generator to act as a power companion on your outdoor adventures. The brand says it can withstand rain, snow, sand, and dust.

That means you should be able to leave your AC60 solar generator outside without fear of an afternoon shower or dust storm ruining your power supply. For longer trips or bigger projects, a B80 battery pack (or two) should give your generator a boost.

If you’ve been looking for a small, portable power station that works in the same conditions you play, the AC60 may be the solution. Check out BLUETTI’s website to learn more about its function and performance.

Early-Bird Savings

As with many BLUETTI launches, there will be an early-bird sale from May 16 to 31. The AC60 portable generator and the B80 battery pack will be $599 each (usually $699).

While the AC60 is made to work with the weatherproof B80, it can also be bundled with the PV120 solar panel for $983, or the PV200 solar panel for $1,168. During the early-bird sale, those pairings will cost $883 and $1,048, respectively.

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Photo c. BLUETTI

This article is sponsored by BLUETTI. Check out the AC60 and other portable power stations.

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6 Comments
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Fake Namerton
Fake Namerton
11 months ago

Is this compatible with Shimano 12 speed?

Wayne
Wayne
11 months ago

FFS… it’s not a “solar generator” (unless it’s the sun)

It’s a battery with an inverter and some USB ports attached. It requires charging. Hence… it’s a storage device. NOT a generator.

I get royally annoyed with the marketing from this mob.

Hamjam
Hamjam
10 months ago
Reply to  Wayne

These things are pretty cool. They do generate power from the sun when a panel is plugged in. In the same way that a gas generator generates power when gas is put in it. However, they do more than use the sun, so maybe there is a better name.

Robin
Robin
10 months ago
Reply to  Hamjam

Uhm, no. Solar panels liberate electrons on their own. You connect them to a circuit if you want to do something useful with those electrons, like store electrical energy or use those electrons to run electric devices. Gas does not do anything on its own except evaporate and maybe absorb water.

Fake Namerton
Fake Namerton
10 months ago

This thing will be in a landfill in a few years while my ancient Honda generator will still be chugging a long.

Al_nyc
Al_nyc
10 months ago

Why is this called a generator? It generates nothing. It is nothing more than a big battery pack. It is great device than can sometimes take the place of a small gas generator, but that does not excuse the misleading name.

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