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Campagnolo direct mount brakes stop the gap in lineup…for now

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Campagnolo direct mount aero road bike brakes

Hot on the heels of decidedly more digital updates like a new EPS battery and wireless transmitter and the MyCampy app, Campagnolo hasn’t forgotten the mechanical parts. They’ve just added direct mount brakes, giving aficionados the same improved stopping power and aerodynamic improvements afforded Shimano and TRP users.

The two-bolt mounting design comes in two iterations, one specifically for forks and seatstay placement (on right), and an alternate rear brake design that provides a better option and more clearance for under-the-bottom bracket chainstay mounts. They use the same Skeleton design as their standard rim brake calipers to keep weight low and stiffness high, and easy adjustability is built in, too…

Campagnolo direct mount aero road bike brakes

Mounting is quick and easy, with a lock nut to ensure everything stays tight.

Campagnolo direct mount aero road bike brakes

Adjustment screws are outward facing for quick, easy access. We’ve requested weights, pricing and availability and will update as soon as we hear back.

We’re still waiting on disc brakes from the Italian component manufacturer, but at least now they’ll be able to keep a full group on the new breed of aero bikes, like those from De Rosa.

Campagnolo.com

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17 Comments
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Anthony
Anthony
7 years ago

Are these rebranded TRP’s like the Athena dual pivots and their aero brakes ?

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
7 years ago

These will be eBay gold in a few years. Wake me up when Campy has a disc brake.

wallymann
wallymann
7 years ago

no single-pivot “differential” option in the back?

SK
SK
7 years ago

Anthony, what are you talking about? Athena dual pivot rebranded?

tomlaw
tomlaw
7 years ago

Disk for road is a marketing ploy and incredibly stupid. There is not a large enough contact patch to take advantage of a disk’s stopping power.

Having trouble stopping your bike?

I’ve been in races and near the middle back of the peloton where the peloton is surging and “yoyoing”. Plenty of riders locking their rear brake during those moments. Can’t wait to see what happens when they grab their brakes too hard with disks.

Jon
Jon
7 years ago

“There is not a large enough contact patch to take advantage of a disk’s stopping power.”

devonbikester
devonbikester
7 years ago

@tomlaw have you ever ridden in the rain? Disks may not make sense for racing, but for everyday riding being able to stop effectively in the wet is quite useful.

Adam2
7 years ago

‘disc brake’ bah! These Campys look nice, but I prefer hex adjustment screws.

Anthony
Anthony
7 years ago

SK: the skeleton Athena brakes are not campy they are made for them by TRP like the TT brakes. Campy US confirmed this to me after I could not figure out why my Mavic exalith pads for Campy would not work in the pad holders.

JBikes
JBikes
7 years ago

tomlaw – as you stated nothing should change since disc brakes can’t offer more power (not my opinion mind you)…you’ll be waiting a long time by your own admission.

Steven
Steven
7 years ago

@Anthony- Do you mean brake pad holders are manufactured by TRP. Per Campagnolo tech documents the only difference between Chorus and Athena are the brake pad holders. Not sure why Campy would contract out something that shares so much of what they already manufacture…

SK
SK
7 years ago

Oh, sorry Anthony, I didn’t know that.

But there are two things that interest me: are Campagnolo TT brakes still in production? I thought they were unveiled a few years ago but almost immediately discontinued (Campagnolo website didn’t even show them).
And are there any TRP models looking exactly like Athena Dual Pivot? (in other words: are Athenas Campagnolo’s own design or TRP’s?) And why are they produced by TRP??

Anthony
Anthony
7 years ago

Steven & SK: not sure why campy did this its the entire brake that was made for them by TRP.

If you run any of the mavic exalith rims you either need to drill a set screw hole in the pads or buy shimaNO holders or buy the Super Records holders which fit the TRP’s but probably cost more than the brakes themselves.

It was a pain as we already had lots of campy pads for mavic wheels so we outfitted 4 bikes with the brakes and found out after the fact we had to do a bit of DIY fixes to get rolling.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
7 years ago

@tomlaw- The really tired “marketing ploy” and “contact patch” arguments just shows you have no real world experience with road disc. We already jumped through these hoops in the mid 90’s when you heard mtb’rs say they’ll never give up their V-brakes. And when something else ‘new?’ comes along your simpleton crew will light up the comment sections again with misinformed speculation. Now tell us what’s “stupid” again…

bb_nl
bb_nl
7 years ago

@ tomlaw “There is not a large enough contact patch to take advantage of a disk’s stopping power.”

True, if breaking were a binary action: on or off. However, it’s completely analogue. Riders may need to ‘tweek’ how they apply their brakes, but from riding disc brakes (TRP HY/RD) on (and off) the road for few weeks now I can tell you:
– No problems with locking out because of the “small contact patch” with the road at all. I’d have to squeeze quite hard to skid the tires. And then: If I really wanted to, I could skid my bike with rim brakes as well.
– With a light to normal tough, my disc brakes offer roughly the same power as my rim brakes. However, where rim brakes just reach their top power at some point – which can be quite scary om very steep descents – the discs always have power left if you just squeeze (a lot) harder
– Indeed, works perfect in the wet
– As easy or even easier to set up as rim brakes
– Aligning the disc inbetween the pads when changing the wheel is no problem at all (assuming non-race situation of course)
– And… the ability to change to as wide a tire as your frame can handle, thereby enlarging the “contact patch” with the road

So in short: In some areas the same as rim brakes (which – if that was all – would indeed qualify discs as a marketing ploy), but in other areas definitely better! Most noticeably: Braking in the wet and choice of (wider) tires.

Come over and try my bike if you’re still not convinced

PsiSquared
PsiSquared
7 years ago

@tomlaw: the better modulation you get with disc brakes means you have less of chance of locking up your brakes under heavy braking with discs than you do with rim brakes.

Clarence
Clarence
6 years ago

Any updates on specs and official release date?

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