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Campagnolo Ekar GT Gravel Group Drops 13sp for 15% Less in Alloy with Wider 480% Range!

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset, new derailleur on-bike
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Campagnolo is back with a next-gen Ekar GT gravel bike groupset, bringing their popular 13-speed made-in-Europe drivetrain down in price thanks to a swap to more aluminum in place of carbon. At the same time as cutting costs, it gets several upgrades and tweaks for better chain retention and wider gearing range options. You save 15% on the price tag, and it’s only a couple hundred grams heavier, making it still lighter and more affordable than other second-tier gravel groups…

Oh yeah, new affordable alloy Zonda GT gravel wheels, too!

Campagnolo Ekar GT is a more affordable alloy 13sp gravel group

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset
(Photos/Campagnolo)

Campy’s most successful all-new product launch in years had been their Ekar gravel groupset. Debuting Campagnolo’s first 1x groupset and first modern drivetrain not focused on road racing, Ekar’s gravel 1x 13-speed setup was a huge departure for the Italian company. But with mechanical simplicity, benchmark lightweight, reliable braking, competitive pricing, and real made-in-Europe construction, the gravel niche ate it up.

Now Campy is back with a new Ekar GT that is even more accessible. Swapping in an aluminum crankset, alloy brake levers, and a simplified rear derailleur, they manage to drop more than two hundred euros off the price, while only adding 300g. It’s still competitively as light or lighter than Shimano or SRAM’s second-tier groups, while being cheaper, and EU-made.

So what’s new?

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset, crankset

The most obvious change is the new simple forged alloy crankset – now with 151mm Q-factor. It still shares the same proprietary 4-bolt design as the original Ekar, but adds a 5th, smaller chainring size for riding steeper terrain.

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset, crankarm backside

Pick from 44, 42, 40, 38, and now also a 36T chainring. You don’t even have to remove the cranks to swap rings. It features a classic Campy Ultra-Torque BB spindle, split in the middle with half of the axle a part of each crank arm.

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset, ergopower levers

The brake levers also shift to alloy lever blades to lower costs. But they retain the same proven Campagnolo Ekar ergonomics, including the thumb upshift lever and reach adjustability. The rubber hoods are slightly reshaped however for better grip when riding up top.

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset, derailleur

Out back the Campagnolo Ekar GT group features a new rear derailleur. This updated design is mostly the same as the original but simplified construction of its non-adjustable clutch. Plus “improved durability”. It moves to more conventional engineered plastic knuckles instead of the carbon-reinforced elements of original Ekar. It also swaps to derailleur pulleys with larger window cutouts to reduce mud clogging, and make it easier to clean.

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset, cassette

The new Ekar GT also gets revised cassettes. They now get a few more loose cogs to save costs with more shared parts. But they also add a new wider 480% range 10-48T cassette. In addition to the original Endurance 9-36T (400%), Gravel Race 9-42T (467%) & Gravel Adventure 10-44T (440%).

The total claimed groupset weight is now 2700g (That’s up from 2385g claimed for the lightest original Ekar configuration. But our gravel race build had a real 2741g total weight, anyway.)

New Zonda GT wheels too…

In addition to the new GT gravel group, there’s a matching set of more affordable GT gravel wheels too. With lots of solid Campy wheel tech, the 1690g Zonda GT wheels are 23mm internal with a tubeless-ready rim bed devoid of spoke holes (or the need for tubeless tape. 24 spokes in G3 groupings promise equal spoke tension and long-term durability, plus milling between the spokes to shave a few grams. The 29mm deep Zonda GTs come with an N3W freehub ready for Campy 13-speed (or 10-12sp) and AFS centerlock disc brake rotor interface

Campagnolo Ekar GT & Zonda GT – Pricing & availability

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset, levers

The new ‘winged-wheel’ logo Campagnolo Ekar GT gravel groupset officially retails for $1600 / 1490€ (compare that to 1700€ for the original.) Campy has been quiet about real-world availability so far, although we have been told that you should be able to order complete bikes built up with Ekar GT this week. We’ve also not had it in our hands yet, either.

The new alloy Zonda GT wheels are also relatively affordable at $750 / 690€.

Historically, Campagnolo has only released new groupsets when the products were already in shops or in-transit on the way to retailers. So far we haven’t heard of anyone with them in stock ahead of the launch.

Campagnolo Ekar GT affordable aluminum alloy mechanical 1x13sp gravel groupset, riding

But fingers crossed that Ekar GT will be available very soon, at least in limited numbers at first.

Ekar was a game-changer for the legacy Italian drivetrain maker. And a more affordable version only compromising a bit on weight seems like it offers a lot of potential for Campy Ekar GT to bring 1×13 mechanical simplicity to a lot more gravel bikes.

Campagnolo.com

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42 Comments
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Blacksmith Cycle
1 month ago

Seems like a good OE spec, but that’s not usually Campy’s focus anyways. 10-48 cassette is a nice option and the cranks look great, but otherwise not all that exciting. Seems like a lot of work to save $200. Can’t imagine most customers won’t take 300 grams saved for that price difference but to each his own!

mud
mud
1 month ago

Probably most the weight diff is in the crank. A good OEM set-up would be a lighter crank that takes a direct mount ring so the user can go smaller than 36.

Ken Kei
Ken Kei
1 month ago

You’re comment about “You don’t even have to remove the cranks to swap rings.” Is that a thing? Are there seriously cranksets out there that require you to remove the crank in order to swap a ring?!?! That’s seriously bad technology if that is indeed true. I’ve ALWAYS just taken an Allen wrench to the rings and removed them easily without even thinking that I needed to remove the cranks.

Scott
Scott
1 month ago
Reply to  Ken Kei

Many single ring setups require crankset removal to remove the chainring: Cannondale, SRAM, Race Face off the top of my head. This is pretty common. Heck, the Cannondale double spiderring chainrings even require it.

Ken Kei
Ken Kei
1 month ago
Reply to  Scott

Thank you. Who knew? Now I know what not to buy.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
1 month ago
Reply to  Ken Kei

Well, you know one thing to not buy. You’re still unaware of all the other cranks where did is required

Dinger
Dinger
1 month ago
Reply to  Ken Kei

It isn’t nearly the chore it sounds like. 2pc cranks go on and off very quickly. Even gives you the chance to inspect your BB bearings and clean dirt out of places you wouldn’t normally reach.

Stephen
Stephen
1 month ago
Reply to  Ken Kei

You’re = you are

Tom
Tom
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephen

Feel better?

Ken Kei
Ken Kei
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephen

Good catch. You’re better than my spell check.

Eggs Benedict
Eggs Benedict
1 month ago
Reply to  Ken Kei

I’m guessing all of the negative votes are from the Direct Mount clan. You’ve spoken against their narrative, now you must pay.

Ken Kei
Ken Kei
1 month ago
Reply to  Eggs Benedict

Who knew that I could troll something that I never even realized existed?!?! I love it!!

Raoulign
Raoulign
1 month ago
Reply to  Ken Kei

Sadly yes and they use ridiculously tiny bolts that require odd tools…
Seriously eight T10 Torx bolts to change the ring on a set of SRAM road/gravel cranks after you’ve had to take the cranks apart?
I thought one lock ring on a pair of White Industries square taper cranks was a pain, not anymore

fitness
fitness
1 month ago

All 10 people who buy this must be very excited

Tom
Tom
1 month ago
Reply to  fitness

Make that 11. I’ll buy. Actually, make that 12. I’ll buy one for you too.

JoeS
JoeS
1 month ago
Reply to  fitness

Hahahaha.

mud
mud
1 month ago

They need to lower their distribution costs to the US. Last I knew they weren’t competitive with other brands.

Mike
Mike
1 month ago
Reply to  mud

Trust me – here in EU they aren’t too. 😛

Ullulu
Ullulu
1 month ago
Reply to  Mike

In Germany you can get the group for just under 1000 EUR currently which might put the GT well into the Apex AXS price range and maybe between the 12s GRXes.

Gary P
Gary P
1 month ago
Reply to  Mike

Yeah, but Shimano/SRAM won’t let Euro sellers ship to the USA, but Campy will. And the Euro prices for Ekar are pretty damn competitive with SRAM/Shimano prices in the USA.

Josh
Josh
1 month ago

Did they fix the transition from the lever to the bar, or is that horribly uncomfortable bump still present?

Stephen
Stephen
1 month ago
Reply to  Josh

No more bumps!

Large D
Large D
1 month ago
Reply to  Josh

They changed the rubber hood but the molded body is the same.

Raoulign
Raoulign
1 month ago

Alloy oooh a chance for shiny polished Campagnolo not there or four random carbon finishes in a groupset, oh not so much just bland black paint…
Oh and cup and cone bearings in the 21st century on a gravel bike, even Shimano have seen sense and gone with sealed bearings.
Seems if you want nice cable driven Italian components you need to buy Ingrid

Justin
Justin
1 month ago
Reply to  Raoulign

I love a good quality cup and cone hub, always choose them over a sealed bearing option. Love my Record hubs. Bashing bearings in and out feels a bit, er, whack?

Yeah sure
Yeah sure
1 month ago
Reply to  Raoulign

Cup and cone is better. Give me cup and cone over sealed garbage any day of the week. Raced CX with cup and cone. No issues. You’ve been duped by marketeers.

Large D
Large D
1 month ago

The current Ekar brake lever is aluminum, not sure why the GT is being heralded as more aluminum including the brake lever. This is a whole lot of nothing for a launch.

mud
mud
1 month ago

If they offered their cassette in to fit Shimano drivers that would be smart. Sram did that for years.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
1 month ago
Reply to  mud

SRAM started that way because they didn’t wanna make people buy different hub bodies. The Campy splines are pretty much just as old as Shimano so it wouldn’t really make sense for them. That said, Shimano and SRAM will be 13sp soon enough and there’s a good chance it’ll be cross compatible due to the lack of space

Sprawl
Sprawl
1 month ago
Reply to  Veganpotter

The brands already have incompatible standards that allow shorter freehubs:
Shimano = Microspline
SRAM = XD
Campagnolo = N3W

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
1 month ago
Reply to  Sprawl

I know, this is in reference to SAM’S past compatability

Justin
Justin
1 month ago
Reply to  Veganpotter

Shesh not more 13 speed. That just takes us closer to the new rear wheel spacing spec that will needed for 14 and 15s.Cos if they didn’t stop at 11 or 12 you know we’ll have 15s one day.

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
1 month ago
Reply to  Justin

13 fits already. Its gonna happen eventually. Why wait? *There’s a guy with 15sp he made himself using a non-boost hub on a boost frame. Pretty awesome setup. He has Mirjam normal 2x gear gaps and wider range than most 2x but it’s 1x. Just a tinkerer making life easier as he has prosthetic appendages. I’d love his 1×15 setup

Ullulu
Ullulu
1 month ago

I’d love a 10-36 or 10-39 road cassette (just have a look at the Rotor 13s ones). Together with a 42t or 44t crank this would the best 1x road option out there.

Now the new 10-48 cassette has tight spacing in the high gears which is all nice and dandy but there are pretty daunting jumps in the middle.

Who’d need those 9t cassettes?

Don Carboneone
Don Carboneone
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullulu

the best 1x road option
^ Oxymoron surely

Ullulu
Ullulu
1 month ago
Reply to  Don Carboneone

My bikes will never see a front derailleur again. With 12 speed it’s a compromise between range and tight gear jumps. 13 speed (almost) fixes this. Couldn’t care less for the 10W or whatever it is I convert to heat.
Don’t do alpine descents on long straight roads so no need for 53×11 and the likes.

Tom
Tom
1 month ago
Reply to  Ullulu

I’ve just moved to 1x myself after holding out for a long time. I’ll never go back to 2x and now wish I had made the switch sooner. The simplicity of a 1x system combined with the capacity of the newer wide range cassettes makes it a great option. My 11 tooth was always clean as a whistle in the old 53 tooth big ring days 🙂

Cryogenii
Cryogenii
1 month ago

Am I the only one thinking adding a mountain bike shifter option would be exciting?

Hans
Hans
1 month ago
Reply to  Cryogenii

I’ve been debating trying it with an archer electronic bar shifter. With 10-48 cassette might finally do it

David
David
1 month ago

NEW RULE: When bicycle press say “alloy” for alumin(i)um, a puppy goes blind.

Frank
Frank
1 month ago
Reply to  David

Bike parts are made of aluminium alloys, usually belonging to the 6000 and 7000 families, that have small amounts of magnesium, silicon, copper, iron, zinc, titanium, manganese or chromium. They are alloys in the proper sense of the word.

Gary P
Gary P
1 month ago

I just railed on Campy in a different article’s comment section for failing to capitalize on the momentum of Ekar by brining a more affordable variant to market. A few weeks later, they announce this. Mea Culpa! As a currenty Ekar owner, I’m in for a second crankset, cassette, and rear derailleur for those trips I take to the mountains where I need a little more low end.

BTW, the article headline is confusing. My first impression was that Campy had brought out a cheaper Ekar that WASN’T 13 speed. Like they “dropped” the 13th cog to save money.

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