Challenge Adds Wider MTB Two Tubular, Effetto Mariposa Develops Revolutionary Carogna Tubular Tape

Challenge Effetto mariposa carogna tubular tape (2)

Tubulars might not be the first thing on your mind for mountain bike tires, unless you’re a racer. Even then the number of mountain bikers running tubulars is fairly small compared to the road or cross. However, if you are one of the few gluing your tires to your rims for the dirt, Challenge has a new tire for you. Called simply the MTB Two, the new tire picks up where the original MTB One left off with a wider, more aggressive build.

If you look at the performance benefits of tubulars, it’s surprising they’re not more popular – until you consider the time and skill needed to glue them to the rim. But what if there was a better way? It looks like Effetto Mariposa may have answered that question…

Challenge Effetto mariposa carogna tubular tape (11)

Like all Challenge Tubulars, the MTB Two is a hand made tire with a latex inner tube built into a 300 TPI SuperPoly (Polycotton) casing. Available in 29 x 2.2″ and 27.5 x 2.2″ tire weights are listed at 650 and 600g respectively. Both tubulars will sell for $154.99 a piece.

Challenge Effetto mariposa carogna tubular tape (4)

Now about that tape. The art of gluing tubulars has been passed down from one generation of mechanics to the next, and the ability to expertly attach a tire to a rim with nothing but Mastic is to be respected. However, if there was an easier, faster, and better way of doing it, that might change the landscape of tubular, clincher, and tubeless tires. The idea of tubular tape instead of cement is nothing new, but current tapes really haven’t delivered in a way that makes cement obsolete.

At first glance, the new Carogna Tubeless Tape from Effetto Mariposa looks like it could change that. Using a base product that was originally developed for aerospace use and to attach plastic to plastic, or plastic to carbon, the base adhesive is then made into tape and cut to width in Italy.

Challenge Effetto mariposa carogna tubular tape (7)

Essentially a liquid tape, the tape has two specific sides – a semi-structural and removable side for the rim, and a permanent adhesive on the tubular side. The industrial grade acrylic glue adheres to both aluminum and carbon rims without any surface prep, while the 1mm thick waterproof tubular glue film spreads out on mounting and sticks to any base tape. In addition to the ease of installation, the tape also has an better temperature rating than standard glue from -40 to 150ºC (-40 – 302ºf). Offered in two different widths, the S measures 16.5mm and the M measures 25mm wide to provide full coverage on the entire surface of the rim, even with wider profiles for MTB and Cross.

Perfect for use with Challenge Tubulars, the tape is said to take about 5 minutes to install, and sets up to 99% of total strength in 24 hours. Challenge told us the tape is nearly just as easy to remove as it is to install by simply deflating the tire completely and pulling up on the tubular. Since the tape is permanent to the tire, the rim is left clean and ready for the next tire. Available in the U.S. from Cantitoe Road, pricing is set at $19.95 for a 2M roll of the narrow 16.5mm tape, $24.95 for the 25mm version, and $99.95 for a 16M shop roll of 16.5mm tape.

challengetech.it

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

25 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Dude
Dude
7 years ago

So $350 for a complete bike setup of tires + tape. For consumable parts that can be trashed by a small piece of glass or the right piece of rock (sealants work in tubulars but only to a point). Owch. Who’s actually buying these things?

Dr Boom
Dr Boom
7 years ago

So a roll of tape is just enough for one 29″ MTB rim. Which means a set of tires installed will cost $360. I can’t imagine why they aren’t more popular.

What happens when you get a flat?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

Conti makes a $200+ dollar tubular for the track. On the track, you have little chance of getting a flat. Still, almost nobody buys them, even top racers that get free stuff don’t use them in mass.

***That being said, you better have a spare wheelset if you use these. I can also see patching tubes as not being a big deal with MTB tires. Still a pain but a patch won’t hinder performance as much as it will on a road bike. You also wouldn’t need to be as great at sewing

MasterOMayhem
MasterOMayhem
7 years ago

So will this tape work with latex base tapes? Cloth base tapes? the tufo only really works with cloth basetapes. are they selling this for CX at low pressure? which cx pros will ride this tape?

CX Hotdog
CX Hotdog
7 years ago

If this glue can do what they claim, I’ll be super stoked! Hopefully Cyclocross Magazine will do a review of this product soon.

Jimborello
Jimborello
7 years ago

Jajaja I want them!! 29 year old, good job, not married, no kids, living with my parents and I love bragging and racing. I guess these are custom made for me =)

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

Jimborello

Are you going to call for a cab when you’re 8miles from the closest road(in the event of a flat) or are you gonna fight the tire off the rim and bring out your sewing skills and start mending these tires and attach a new strip of tape that you probably forgot to bring with you?

I’ve patched a tubular road tire before. It was in the comfort of my own home and wasn’t that big of a pain but I wouldn’t want to go out on a ride with a sewing kit. I was also lucky enough to know where the hole was. I wouldn’t want to get a pinch flat with these because they’d leave no evidence of the location of the flat on the outside and you may wind up removing the entire tube from the tire…that’s a lot of sewing. I only had to sew about 6″ of tire to do my repair

Serious
Serious
7 years ago

If we need to remove the tubular to true a wheel can the tape be removed from the tubular and a new tape just reapplied? Or will pulling the tape off the tubular destroy the base layer?

m
m
7 years ago

WOW

Some of the comments are just ridiculous. These tires are NOT for the everyday ride, they are designed as a race day only tire. If you get a flat your not to far from the pits/car. If you have every ridden tubulars on the road for for CX then you know they are absolutely amazing?
I bet most of the people bashing these have never exerienced the joy of riding tubulars

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

m…

I have friends that have had multiple demo days on MTB tubulars and said they really were unbeatable. That said, this isn’t for time trialing. Who wants to have a spectacular handling tire for racing when they don’t get to train on them? From what I hear, the handling is significantly better and allows you to be much more aggressive. This is something you should be practicing with.

For road, there is definitely a handling difference from tubies to clinchers but not that much different from a crappy clincher to a good clincher

edubfromktonw
edubfromktonw
7 years ago

I’ve run Stan’s tubeless setups on mountain bikes for years… no chance I would ever run tubular.

The thought of getting a sidewall tear or flat in the woods that I can’t fix and freezing to death just doesn’t sound like fun.

Funk Freshington
Funk Freshington
7 years ago

Two camps. People who run tubulars. People who don’t. Neither will budge. End of thread.

Loki
Loki
7 years ago

M- agree, these are race wheels, and just like in cx it’s appropriate for it’s narrow niche.

Veganpotter – Just like cx racers don’t use their race wheels to train, I’d also argue that you don’t need to train on them. If it’s been raining the night before, you quickly adjust after your pre-laps to available traction. At a DH race it could be dry on practice day and rain on race day. You quickly adjust. Having the extra traction on race day, helped by a few warm up laps, is a measurable advantage. Using the argument that you can’t benefit from them everyday therefore you shouldn’t benefit from them on race day is false logic.

FWIW, anecdotally, I commute on my tubulars in the city during the summer months. For me, the risk of puncture and expense is offset by the fact that I would hardly get to ride and train if I didn’t commute, I love the feel of tubulars and I don’t want to own something I hardly ever use. For me, the risk benefit ratio works, for some one else, not.

It’s the difference between ‘that thing is ugly’ or ‘I think that thing is ugly’.

Dude
Dude
7 years ago

In CX you’re always within running distance of a pit, or a short walk from your car, and the courses are relatively tame. In road races you’ve got at least one car to hand out a wheel or a ride. MTB not so much. Seems like a very small subset of MTB races one would risk taking these to.

Tomi
Tomi
7 years ago

I’ve raced on schwalbe racing ralph tubulars this season. Ironically it was initially a cost effective choice as I used my spare CX disc wheelset (that I choosed to build with ambrosio MTB tubular rims). Obviously I only did “sprint” races of less than 2h. I had a flat once which forced me to DNF and reach the finish line by foot but it wasn’t too long and I wasn’t the only one to flat in that area. Back home I put some tubeless milk in them and inflated and the puncture was sealed.

In the end I sold the wheelset. Not because they weren’t great and didn’t want to deal with tubulars but I was also doing marathon events on tubeless wheels I purchased later and didn’t want to keep two wheelsets. I have already way too many wheels with the road and CX bikes.

Sometimes I regret selling them.

scentofreaon
scentofreaon
7 years ago

loki, Being able to train on the tire you race is one of the most missed phenomena’s in the tire industry. How many companies have the wonder uber light tire for ‘race day only’, yet don’t offer that tread in an all day training version? I am truly supposed to train on full knobbies , then at a race where I push myself to my limits, go out and ride semi-slicks? What really happens is you never learn to really push the semi-slick because you only get to ride it at a half dozen races a year. The tire in this article is no different. It would make complete sense to offer the same tread on a more resilient tire so that I could run them on ‘training wheels’. Thus being able to use the training wheels for all my other rides during the year, getting a great feel for the how the tread handles, then maximizing the ‘race wheel/tire combo’ on race day.

Joe
Joe
7 years ago

I don’t get some of the claims on the tape … if it’s so easy to peel the tire off the rim (“Challenge told us the tape is nearly just as easy to remove as it is to install by simply deflating the tire completely and pulling up on the tubular”), I’d be skeptical that it’s going to hold the tire on when you’re running low 20’s psi in your cx tubbies?

the other Andy
the other Andy
7 years ago

Nino Schurter doesn’t train on his Dugast tubulars, but he seems to make the transition back to racing on them fairly well each weekend.

My problem with these is Challenge’s quality control. I have several of their tires, to include their MTB One. All of them have serious issues, and their durability is terrible. The MTB tires are even worse than their CX tires in terms of tread alignment.

If you want a tire that is made well, get Tufo, Schwalbe, or Dugast.

CXisfun
CXisfun
7 years ago

@the other Andy: until recently I would have completely agreed, but Challenge tires have been solid in my experience for the last year. Prior to that, they were constantly failing.

I rode MTB tubular wheels for 2 years, and still would be if I still owned the wheelset, but I foolishly sold it to a friend. The traction was shocking out of them. I carried a can of sealant with me (Caffelatex) just in case I had a flat. I did put Caffelatex in the tire from day 1 and never did flat.

Coincidentally, I was riding a few years back with a Schwalbe/Stans tubeless setup and sliced my sidewall on some glass. Guess who had to call for his wife to pick him up?

Veganpotter
Veganpotter
7 years ago

***Loki

Most cyclocross racers don’t use their racing wheels to train on. At the same time, a large percentage of them have cheaper tubulars that aren’t glued to aero rims and racing tubulars glued to a deeper wheel. That’s pretty normal. This is very different from the majority of road riders who practically ALL train on clinchers and many race on tubies(again, the differences are smaller on the road than for cross).

hjn
hjn
7 years ago

Tufo has been selling mtb tubular gluing tape for several years. http://www.tufo.com/gluing-tape/

Tomi
Tomi
7 years ago

@scentofreaon I think you are missing the point that there are not 2 days with the very same weather/ground/temp conditions. What you would learn during training with race day tires would not necessarily apply to the actual races you enter. Even in the same day the available grip can change dramatically from the best or from the worst between the recon and the actual race.

adam
adam
7 years ago

Id buy this in a heartbeat for my CX wheels, despite it being more than a can of Mastik, for the ease of install. However, I do not want to be the first one to test how easily a tire may roll off. Ive been gluing (glue only) my CX tubies for years, and while 3 days of a prep and a whole lot of praying is a pain in the a$$, I havent ever had tubular contact failure.

Tufo makes tape too. you couldnt pay me to ride that $hit on my Tufo cx tires. HOW IS THIS ANY DIFFERENT??? (It looks sorta like the Tufo tape, too). Until it can be confirmed that this “liquid tape” with “two specific sides” will hold my tires and/or until the pros are confident enough to use it, why should I?

Any tech specs on the tape? How does it differ from Tufo?

Juan Pablo
Juan Pablo
7 years ago

Hola,

I was always terrified of using/purchasing Tubulars for all the reasons exposed here and then some … Until I got my hands on a set of AX Lightness tubular wheels (29) with 25mm wide base to glue the tire on …1050gms, stiffer (way stiffer) than my ARCH EX or my I9 Trail wheel sets and over 1lb lighter …

So now I use Tufo Tubulars, race on them, train on them, get occasional flats, the Tufo latex sealant won’t let me barely notice the loss of pressure (seem to seal faster than Stans on a regular tire). Once I got a shard of glass on my sidewall, when I took it out the tire immediately deflated and I thought that was the END… So I made use of the emergency only Tufo Extreme sealant (sidewall glass cut, YES) and sealed, and the tire was on my rear wheel for 4 more months of training after racing Grand Junction Epic last August …
Hopefully these helps someone that is truly interested in them, if you have not ridden them stop imagining death scenarios because of a flat… I have had those death scenarios with my Stans setups with irreparable tears. Not yet on my Tufos … When I go back to tubeless setup unless is a Hans Dampf 2.35 at 18 PSI I can’t even compare the traction … so if someday I have to walk back to the car carrying my 1050gm AX lightness wheels because of a flat … oh well my shoulders got a workout instead … kinda.

Almon Poole
7 years ago

I have been riding tufo tape for years, and mostly ride tubulars for every ride. I can change a tire in under ten minutes this way.