Whistler Performance Lubricants product family

After roughly two years of product development, Whistler Performance Lubricants emerged onto the mountain biking scene last summer. The rider owned and operated company specializes in manufacturing high performance, environmentally friendly lubricants for forks, rear shocks and chains. We met WPL’s President and accomplished chemist Alejandro Marangoni, and General Manager Isaac Marangoni at Crankwork Whistler to get the low down on their high-end oils.

WPL’s products are all non-toxic and biodegradable, so they’re safe to the touch and require no special handling procedures. Their shock oils are also free of additives to resist burning, increase their lubricity and reduce the sticky feel that other brand’s oils can produce. All of WPL’s products are developed and manufactured in Canada from renewable resources, and here’s what they had to show us at Crankworx…

Whistler Performance Lubricants fork boost

WPL’s Fork Boost is a handy fork seal lubricant and cleaner. The product is applied to the stanchion tubes, and as you cycle the fork up and down it lifts the dirt out of your seals leaving them clean and freshly lubricated. This allows the seal to do its job best by keeping them compliant and removing the grit and grime that can hamper their precise fit.

Alejandro Marangoni said their Fork Boost has proven quite popular with racers, or everyday riders and mechanics who are fussy about suspension performance. They had a demo bike on display at the tent, and its fork seals looked like they’ never seen dirt or dust.

Whistler Performance Lubricants chain boost

Their Chain Boost is called a ‘wet’ lube but the company recommends using it for all conditions. The Chain Boost emulsifies with water, so when you want to wash it off just blast it with a hose or run it though a wet rag and the accumulated dirt and dust shed off with the lube, leaving your drivetrain squeaky clean. That said, the formula doesn’t come off so easily that riding in the rain or splashing through puddles will de-lube your chain. Marangoni says Chain Boost lasts a long time and most riders tend to re-apply it when cleaning their chains, but well before it wears itself out.

Whistler Performance Lubricants shock boost

WPL’s Shock Boost is designed to resist cavitation and air emulsification, and is compatible with all types of seals. The oil comes in several different weights to meet various manufacturer’s specifications. It is sold in 20wt, 10wt and 2.5wt, and there is a mixing chart on the back of the bottle so you can whip up intermediate weights by blending two types together.

WPL says their service intervals remain the same as whatever your manufacturer typically recommends with their stock oil. The company recommends cleaning your shock or fork internals with ethanol, but say with the additive-free oils there is little risk of contamination. The purity of the oil also keeps burning at a minimum- when oil goes black it’s typically due to additives burning up over time, but WPL’s products don’t have any, so they stay clean and clear.

Whistler Performance Lubricants already has plans to develop their own pivot grease, bike wash and bike polish, so keep an eye on their website for future releases. Their products are available online through MEC, Vorsprung Suspension or Dunbar Cycles, and at various bike shops across British Columbia.

wploils.com

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Veganpotter
Veganpotter
6 years ago

Finally!!! Nice to see some of the dirtiest parts of keeping a bike running are cleaning up. Hopefully they can make some type of DOT Fluid replacement in the future

l3eaudacious
l3eaudacious
6 years ago

I bought some of the Chain Boost lube cause I like supporting Canadian companies. But to my surprise it actually works. Just sprayed off the bike with the garden hose, and the cassette and chain look almost brand new. I didn’t even clean the cassette before application, it took all the old gunk off along with it. The lube itself is pretty great, its thicker like most wet lubes.

I’ll definitely give the fork lube’s a try when my local MEC gets them in stock. Always stoked when awesome new products come from awesome Canadian companies. Also stoked about the grease, Slickolieum gives me a headache if I’m not in a really well ventilated area.

cole
cole
6 years ago

I’m ridiculously in favor of biodegradable and renewable lubricants (and everything else). But AFAIK, especially in the case of plain bearings, oil darkens due to suspended metal particles (and other contaminants); if you’ve ever looked closely at dirty fork oil, it glitters. Additive free oil lacks the “D/D package,” detergents and dispersants, the purpose of which is to distribute and suspend metal particles (making the oil black) instead of allowing them to stick together and form an abrasive paste, which accumulates around the wear surface, the bearing. This is bad news.
Even if it were additives burning up, that would imply rather high temperatures are reached. If true, this is even worse for the product, because the measurements they provide (thankfully) show that the viscosity is completely gone at 100 c.
Conclusion: probably still better, though requiring more strict (like, actual) adherence to service schedules and thoroughly cleaning between oil changes (which will be so, So much easier). I’m eager to try it, I hate working with non-sustainable gross pollutants. Alejandro, get cracking on bio-degradable D/D additives or equivalent… burning through stanchions isn’t sustainable either.

Alejandro Marangoni
6 years ago

Thank you Cole. You are correct, not only do polymer additives burn, but metal come off the different metallic surfaces. Our oils have a natural polar component which binds to metals and keeps them from sticking to surfaces. We have not had problems so far, but we can add the component in ChainBoost to the suspension oil as well, and that one is a powerful, and safe, D/D type additive. Let’s see if we need it….we are trying to minimize the use of additives by thinking a bit outside the box. Many thanks for the excellent comment; please keep them coming!

Alejandro Marangoni
6 years ago

Thank you Veganpotter! We have been running our version of mineral oil replacement in our Zee Brakes for a week in the Whistler Bike park so far. It is looking very good and the brakes are working amazingly well. The only concern there is long-term stability and the problem Cole was mentioning – metal contamination. Replacing the mineral oil based brake fluid for Magura and Shimano brakes will be no problem, I hope. Replacing DOT fluid…….that is a tough one. However, silicone oil based systems are not the solution either. Silicone oil is unstable above 150degC and breaks down happily producing a lot of formaldehyde! Brakes run frequently above 150degC, so I do not get silicone oil based brake fluids….do not touch used silicone oil based brake fluid; cannot be good for you.