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Diamondback goes direct for bikes over $450

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It’s really no longer a surprise to hear a brand is going consumer direct in one form or another. The way consumers purchase bikes is quickly changing, and most companies seem to think that the time is now to offer online sales. That often comes with positioning those sales so that they don’t over step the brand’s own dealers to varying levels of success.

Following the wave of bikes available on the web, Diamondback is throwing their hat in the ring for anything over $450. The news follows their recent announcement of Diamondback’s Custom Studio tool giving customers even more options to make changes to their new bike before they buy…

According to the release from Diamondback, the one of the biggest changes to implement the program came from the assembly and packaging of the bike itself. To ensure that consumers were able to assemble their new bikes quickly and safely, Diamondback says they overhauled the way their bikes came from the factory to create the ReadyRide program. Bikes over $450 are all packaged in a way that Diamondback claims to result in an assembly time as little as 10 minutes. They also claim no experience necessary, but we’re guessing that if you have zero experience, your assembly times might be a little (lot) more than 10 minutes.

However, there are step by step instructional videos on the Diamondback site to guide you through the process as well as “expert mechanics” that you can contact through a live chat feature if you have any issues.

 

All bikes sold direct have the option of delivery through Beeline Bikes as well which provides another option for assembly if you’re not comfortable with doing it yourself. Like Raleigh bikes delivered through Beeline, the end result is an assembled bike that is dropped off at your door and fit to you.

diamondback.com

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Other Aaron
Other Aaron
5 years ago

My LBS’s owner’s friend, who happens to be intimately familiar with a specific small, yet currently review topping, mountain bike brand, ran into a tech from beeline at the local trails. The tech was riding a bike from said brand and was complaining that it was the worst bike he had ever ridden. Being intimately familiar with the bike, the friend asked to take a look. The drive-train was not properly adjusted, sag on the shock was at 65% and the upper bushings on the shock were missing because the tech claimed that they “were not necessary”.

Just a cautionary tale
Specifics have been altered to protect the subjects

myke2241
myke2241
5 years ago
Reply to  Other Aaron

Minus a couple things I build my bikes up at home. Need my bb bearings pressed. Rolled down to a pretty high end lbs. pressed them in for me in no time. I get home to install the crank. They pressed them in on the wrong side. The fixed the issue but six months down the line the frame was had to be warrantied because the bb shell was out of tolerance and would no longer hold the bb in place.

(deleted)

JNH
JNH
5 years ago
Reply to  myke2241

The first mistake was buying a frame with a press fit bb. No good ever comes of that.

SJC
SJC
5 years ago
Reply to  myke2241

I don’t know of any press-fit systems where the outer diameter of the bearings/cups varies from between drive side and non-drive side – they all have a consistent bore diameter (at least nominally). So while the shop may have screwed up by, say, pressing in your press-fit to GXP BB backwards, that’s not what threw your BB shell out of tolerance. That could have been due to many different things, including improper installation/removal technique by the shop (i.e. the bearings went in crooked), manufacturing defect, or just bad luck.

myke2241
myke2241
5 years ago
Reply to  SJC

it actually was a huge part of the issue. the cups were hammered out. and it was pretty harsh. had some grinding and creaking almost straight away. after a month of wet weather it was done. btw Sram gxp bearing are side specific. its been that way for awhile!

@JNH please point out a modern carbon HT in 2015 that that had threaded bearing and is not custom.

anyway the point is LBS are not immune from Idiotic mistakes no make the type of bike or location.

i tell you the story of how i built up a new rig for my lady. i ran out of bleed kits so to the LBS. bike was returned with the steer cut all the way down….. that was the shop owner who did that.

N Harnois
N Harnois
5 years ago
Reply to  myke2241

How about Santa Cruz Highball for example

David Marvin
David Marvin
5 years ago
Reply to  myke2241

Here’s one that meets your requirements – a Canfield EPO

Travis
Travis
5 years ago
Reply to  Other Aaron

I hope that was a terrible attempt at satire. If not, that was the most worthless post I have wasted my time to read on here. If i can understand, you are trying to caution everyone against Beeline’s techs because you heard it through your LBS’s owner who heard it from a friend that they were bad?

bearcol
bearcol
5 years ago

Good looking vpp frames.

Nick
Nick
5 years ago

I thought Diamondback already went consumer direct a few years back?

myke2241
myke2241
5 years ago
Reply to  Nick

Maybe they wanted to remind people lol.

mtb4me
mtb4me
5 years ago

Who on earth cares about Diamondback regardless of their channel?

lop
lop
5 years ago
Reply to  mtb4me

Not anyone who reads Bike Rumor, but lots of normal bike riders don’t think twice about the brand Diamondback. Those are the people who buy bikes at retail.

King County
King County
5 years ago

The DB bikes are pretty nice. Its someone like ‘us’ designing the bikes, Instead of being on the outside of the industry, making comments, he or she is on the inside, making a living. I would still prefer to buy a bike in person, though.

James Koenig
5 years ago

As much as I would love to support my LBS in a full on frame/bike purchase… I just can’t afford to. It’s an expensive sport, and I’ve never been taken better care of, than by Diamondback customer service.

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