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Easton Embraces Tubeless Ready Road with Wider, Lighter EA90SL

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EA90SL_Closeup_720x480_72_RGB

Easton is no stranger to tubeless, but up to this point their tubeless wheels have required proprietary parts to allow for a solid rim bed. While solid rim beds are more airtight for better tubeless performance, they required proprietary dual threaded nipples which resulted in a wheel that was not consumer serviceable in most cases. Of course, the design also required specific parts which could be harder to come by in case of a failure.

Deciding to ditch the previous tubeless design, Easton is introducing their first tubeless ready wheel set with the EA90SL. Available in rim or disc brake models, the tubeless ready nature of the rim allows for Easton to also offer the rims separately. If that wasn’t enough to catch your attention, the EA90SLs are also wider and lighter to check as many boxes as possible…

easton ea 90 wheels

No longer relying on the solid rim channel for the tubeless option, the new 19.5 mm internal width rim relies on a more conventional tubeless tape to seal off the spoke holes. Outside the aluminum rims are 24mm wide with a 27 mm deep, rounded, Fantom inspired profile made to be as stiff and impact resistant as possible.

The standard straight pull, double butted, Sapim spokes and nipples are laced in 20/f and 24/r with the rim brake wheelset built with a radial/1x-2x pattern while the disc brake version sees 3x lacing front and rear. The disc brake wheelset runs the M1 hubset which ships with 9×100 and 10x135mm QR axle configurations but is upgradable to 15×100 and 12×135/142 with parts that are sold separately. Claimed weight for the disc set is listed at 1570 g.

EA90SL_Shi-Sram_Front_628x720_72_RGB EA90SL_Shi-Sram_Rear_596x720_72_RGB

The dedicated rim brake set uses all of the same tubeless tech, rim shape, and spokes but adds a rim brake specific rim and the Easton Echo hubset. Weight for the EA90SL wheelset is claimed at 1490g.

R90SL_RimBrake_720x720_72_RGB R90SL_Disc_720x720_72_RGB

Called the R90 SL and R90 SL Disc, the rim only options provide a tubeless ready solution in 24 (rim only), 28, and 32 holes. Otherwise, the 24 mm external width, 24mm internal width, and 27 mm height remains the same and both rims are manufactured from EA90 aluminum with a welded construction. Coming in at 445 g for the disc option and 455 g for the rim brake version, both rims are anodized black with vinyl decals. Pricing and availability TBA.

 

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fluxus
fluxus
7 years ago

Nice wheels and the decision for rim tape instead of solid alloy rim wall is a good one – thanks to more conventional nipples. You cant get the exotic parts/nipples from easton here in germany and nobody needs a solid rim channel – tape can do the job.

In the end, I’m completely disapointed about eastons wheels. Two times I rode a higher quality wheelset from them – EA90 SLX on RR and EA 70 XCT on MTB. In both cases, the spokes started to break after one or two years. After the first failure and repair, other spokes followed few weeks later, like a bad joke. On the road wheels – i replaced the complete set of spokes with sapim cxray – now its fine. On MTB – the whells go to trash, thanks to the exotic nipples.

Easton – dont build such cheap spokes into your wheels and test for longtime use, please!!!

fluxus
fluxus
7 years ago

And no – I’m not heavy – 70kg.

pfs
pfs
7 years ago

19.5mm internal? Are these for road use only? Even my road wheels are wider than that!

Gruntled Hintrap
Gruntled Hintrap
7 years ago

Those are some magical rims, having both 24mm external AND internal widths. I wonder how Easton managed that? Just incredible. I want them!

Gorilla Biscuit
Gorilla Biscuit
7 years ago

@fluxus Sapim made those “bad spokes” you got in those two Easton wheels also, it is a spoke manufacturer QC issue, many companies catch this and try to get them out of circulation ASAP, however, some make it to market.

Steve
7 years ago

Easton uses Sapim spoke in there wheels, The same brand you used to replace.

ifbikes
ifbikes
7 years ago

There’s nothing really hard about replacing their previous spokes. The nipple was special, but if the spoke broke you got a new straight pull spoke and used the old nipple. While some people don’t like old nipples, I don’t judge.

PTymn Wolfe
PTymn Wolfe
7 years ago

One to two years is a completely normal product life cycle, especially with high end light weight components. You’re paying for performance not longevity. Until consumers realize and accept this they will always be “disappointed”

rodegeek
rodegeek
7 years ago

@PTymn Wolfe, I used to ride aluminum tubular rims weighing between 280 and 350 grams. I laced them to conventional hubs (usually Campy Nuovo Record) with DT stainless spokes. They lasted for the better part of a decade if I didn’t crash. Two years is a ridiculously short lifespan for any wheelset that weighs 1400 grams or more. It’s still possible to build light and durable wheels using hubs, spokes and rims that are available separately. As a bonus, you or your favorite LBS can select the parts specifically for your weight, riding style and intended use. They will typically cost less than any of the wheel “systems” of comparable weight, even if you need to pay the shop to build them.

wheelz
wheelz
7 years ago

@PTymn: I have put a bit over 20,000 miles on my Dura Ace wheels in the last two years and have yet to need to true them. Some manufacturers make light-weight, high performance stuff that actually lasts.

Simenf
Simenf
7 years ago

19.5 mm ID. That pretty much sums it up. Just incredibly backwards, even for XC racing.

Steve
7 years ago

@Simenf these are road wheels. What are you talking about?

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