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EB14: Konstructive Weaves A Brand from High End Carbon

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konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (34)

While the big brands have mass produced carbon bikes on lock down, there is one area where the smaller brands will always have an edge – custom frames. If you’re spending big bucks on a carbon frame it should be to your liking, right? That’s where companies like Konstructive come in with the ability to offer extremely light carbon frames tailored to an individual rider.

Based out of Berlin, all of the Konstructive frames are designed in Germany and then produced inside of Europe. Utilizing a tube to tube construction method, the company is able to offer truly custom geometry with the expense of producing individual molds. Add to that a custom paint program on some extremely light frames and Konstructive’s edge begins to take shape.

Check out their impressive carbon construction plus a number of new frames next…

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (31)

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (36) konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (35)

Right off the bat you notice the carbon tubes used by Konstructive feel different than many. We’re told this is because the carbon is wound very tightly over aluminum mandrels. Then when the tubes are cured, the aluminum expands making the carbon that is already under some tension become taut adding to the strength and stiffness of the tubes. This process also results in one of the cleanest inner tube walls we’ve seen which cuts down on weight.

The end result is road frames in the 800-820g range and mountain bike frames as low as 1030g. All of the Konstructive frames are available with stock geometry, but they are also available in custom geometry for an additional charge.

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (32)

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (33) konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (27)

If you’re going to make custom, light weight carbon frames a 29er race bike is a good place to start for a mountain bike. Called the Iolite, the frame uses all of the modern standards including a tapered head tube, 73mm PF30 BB, 142×12 rear axle and the option for a rigid fork or suspension. Fully Di2 compatible, Iolite frames range from 1030g for the S to 1180g for the XL.

The bare carbon with clear coat above is the standard finish, but like all Konstructive frames they can be ordered with naked, half painted (maroon Iolite above), or fully painted like the bike below.

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (44)

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (46) konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (45)

Along the same lines as the Iolite, the Zeolite takes Konstructive design to the cyclocross course. Designed with vibration damping in mind for comfort through washboard ruts, the frame is disc brake only with the ability to run 140mm or 160mm rotors. Internal shift cabling is routed through the downtube with easy access. Again a PF30 BB is used (68mm) while the frame sticks with quick releases front and rear. The frame comes in around 1,150g for a 56cm.

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (38)

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (41) konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (43)

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (40)

As their true light weight masterpiece, the Rhodolite comes in at 800-900g  depending on the size. Note that this is a road disc frame we’re talking about. Equipped with post mount disc brakes, internal brake hose and shift cable routing, and a 27.2 seat post for compliance (standard on Konstructive frames), the bike is meant as a race ready road disc bike that is still super comfortable.

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (28)

konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (30) konstructive  bikes carbon berlin (29)

No, Konstructive isn’t building fat bikes just yet. Instead this was simply to show what they are capable of and to practice new techniques. Though who knows – it seemed to be attracting a lot of attention.

Each Konstructive frame includes a 5 year warranty through Revolution Sports, but the frames can also be repaired in the event of a non-warranty failure through the Konstructive Carbon Lab. This service is also offered for frames and components from companies other than Konstructive.

konstructive.de

 

 

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abc
abc
8 years ago

That fatbike looks solid. Cool to offer a repair service also, despite the pricing for this kind of stuff is probably sky high…

MM
MM
8 years ago

Interesting, looks like the chromag bear on that h/t

Eric E. Strava
Eric E. Strava
8 years ago

@MM was just gonna mention the logo looks like half of the Chromag logo.

onion
onion
8 years ago

I assume the logo is based on the flag / coat of arms of Berlin, where the bikes are designed: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Berlin

M. C. Slammer
M. C. Slammer
8 years ago

The bear is from the Berlin coat of arms/flag.

Deutschish
Deutschish
8 years ago

The bear was likely chosen for Konstructive’s logo due to the company’s headquarters in Berlin where the bear has been a part of the Berlin coat of arms for hundreds of years.

jr
jr
8 years ago

YAWYD top cap on the fatbike, nice touch.

hair
hair
8 years ago

Nice twin lateral tt on the fatty.

Out for a Ride
Out for a Ride
8 years ago

Ok but someone explain the dancing bear on the HT

greg
greg
8 years ago

IS rear disc mount on the cross bike is odd. so is the front disc hose run on the outside of the fork. if the fork is designed around having the hose routed like that, id consider a different fork, from a manufacturer that sweats the details.

CJ
CJ
8 years ago

That maroon 29er is gorgeous…

ethanM
ethanM
8 years ago

custom eh? then why the 600mm seatposts?

Troy Junge
Troy Junge
8 years ago

@ethanM, the germans are tall people, they wonder why those US bike company bikes come with such short seatposts

buriedundersnow
buriedundersnow
8 years ago

zee germans…..

Charlie Best
Charlie Best
8 years ago

Tall or not, that much post out on a road bike looks ugly.

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