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EB15: The Alutech ICB 2.0 crowdsourced full suspension mountain bike becomes a reality

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Alutech ICB 2 crowdsourced full suspension trail mountain bike from MTB-news germany

If someone told you they took to a mountain bike website’s forum dwellers to design a mountain bike, our guess is eyes would roll hard and jokes would pour forth faster than the trolls could attack the very notion itself.

But that’s just what MTB-News.de, one of the top German mountain bike websites, did in partnership with Alutech, a German frame builder, and designer Stefan Stark. The result it the ICB 2.0, a 130mm trail bike with all the features you’re likely to want and nothing you don’t.

The reality of the project’s contributors was less the passive aggressive smart asses and naysayers and more of an enthusiastic and supportive community that included industry folks, mechanical and other engineers, 3D designers and avid riders. With thousands of eyeballs on the project, good ideas surfaced quickly and the best ones were voted up and up until they became mandatory design considerations. Chief among them was keeping it simple and user friendly, focused more on being ridable day in and day out than having all the latest whiz-bang standards and features. That said, it’s got a few treats some of the big brands should pay attention to…

Alutech ICB 2 crowdsourced full suspension trail mountain bike from MTB-news germany

A tapered head tube with internal bearing races is fairly standard these days, but the svelte oversized hydroformed downtube gusset is rare on small batch frames. The bike is as much a showpiece for Alutech’s capabilities as anything. Readers wanted internal cable routing to keep everything clean and protected. The ports bolt on and hold the cable housing and hoses snug to prevent rattling.

Alutech ICB 2 crowdsourced full suspension trail mountain bike from MTB-news germany

While most readers wanted 1x, enough folks still liked the idea of having a front derailleur that they built in threaded tabs for a low-mount mech. ISCG tabs allow for a chain guide and/or bash guard, too.

Alutech ICB 2 crowdsourced full suspension trail mountain bike from MTB-news germany

The shock extension yoke gave them some control over the leverage ratio (they made it slightly progressive with 110% anti-squat) without complicating the single pivot design. Putting aside patent concerns, the crowd really just wanted it to be simple and serviceable. Thus, minimal pivot points for low friction, with the main pivot having preload-adjustable angular contact bearings.

Alutech ICB 2 crowdsourced full suspension trail mountain bike from MTB-news germany

A standard threaded bottom bracket was also tops on the list. Note the clever brake hose tunnel just above the main pivot, keeping it from flailing around and out of the way of heel rub.

Alutech ICB 2 crowdsourced full suspension trail mountain bike from MTB-news germany

Ample tire clearance for a 27.5 x 2.35 gives you plenty of meat for ripping through the trails.

Alutech ICB 2 crowdsourced full suspension trail mountain bike from MTB-news germany

They stuck with 12×142 rear thru axle spacing because there’s just not enough out there for Boost…and because the project was underway before Boost really became a thing. But mainly, people just wanted to be able to use use their existing parts and wheels but upgrade their frame.

Alutech ICB 2 crowdsourced full suspension trail mountain bike from MTB-news germany

As for the name, ICB means Internet Community Bike, and it’s available for order now. Put your name on the list with no deposit for just the frame. Put down a 50% deposit and you’ll get your choice of a Rockshox Monarch+ Debonair. Put down 75% of the €1,399 price and it’ll ship with a Fox Float X rear shock. Orders are being taken now with delivery expected in February 2016.

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26 Comments
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riley martin
riley martin
7 years ago

immediate first thought…..it looks like a new GT I-drive

Reuben
Reuben
7 years ago

I like this bike but no water bottle = no go for me… Do riders in Germany just not care about water bottles? (deleted)

Flint
Flint
7 years ago

Given the huge number of bikes on the market these days I think it would be pretty hard to come up with a unique looking frame. I like it but as mentioned above I also like having a water bottle. My Santacruz Bronson (alu) frame costs me $2309, this frame would cost me $2021 before postage, GST, import duties custom fees etc… So closer to $2700 by the time it reached me. It would be a great option if you live in the EU. I wish them the best of luck in this tough market.

Raven
Raven
7 years ago

If it’s worth anything. I’m from Germany, and I don’t use Water Bottles. Have to carry a backpack anyway to have all necessary tools in reach, so I can use a hydration pack… 😉

TheFunkyMonkey
TheFunkyMonkey
7 years ago

Very cool concept – wishing them luck with it. The cable routing is really clean and that cable tunnel on the swingarm is trick.

parkcyc
parkcyc
7 years ago

Very nice looking.
Super clean welds!!!

haromania
haromania
7 years ago

I find it odd this was designed by so many people who don’t drink water. Looks cool though and I wish them luck and lots of good fortune.

badIuck
badIuck
7 years ago

One of the longest drawn out discussion was about the possibilty of mounting a bottlecage. With most of the people taking part in the design being more gravity oriented they tend to all wear hydrationpacks while riding compared to the XC kind of guy.
For the majority of members the ideal linkage in conjunction with the low and sleek look was more important though in every discussion there would be people bringing up that they’d never buy a bike they couldn’t mount a cage onto.

Tom
Tom
7 years ago

I guess you can count me in the passive/aggressive snarky water bottle camp.

Otherwise, it looks great, and I wish them the best of luck!

And let’s have a HUGE round of applause for the threaded BB.

JBikes
JBikes
7 years ago

Like a Santa Cruz Bantam (discontinued???) – a good thing.

Anyway, who takes care of warranty issues and stuff like replacement frames? The magazine or Alutech or someone else?

out for a ride
out for a ride
7 years ago

I’d like to see the community discussion about no water bottle. It might lead to some insight as to why *many* companies don’t provide them. I suspect armchair engineers abound don’t realize the restrictions that a huge bottle puts on things like standover, aesthetics, and shock placement (thus suspension curve adjustability).

badluck
badluck
7 years ago

http://www.mtb-news.de/forum/t/icb2-0-alutech-design-buckelwal-haengebauchschwein-und-bananenschwinge.719528/page-20#post-12257851

This was basically the reasoning. When the suspension design was figured out and set in stone, there was no place for a bottle to fit and we didn’t want to sacrfice performance for it.

Also here are all the discussions in case anyone is interested. Google translator might help.

http://www.mtb-news.de/forum/f/internet-community-bike-2-0-powered-by-alutech.264/

Trail Dog
Trail Dog
7 years ago

+1 badluck.
If you put the shock on the top tube it kills the leverage ratio progression. This is a really well designed bike.

Mountain Dew Drinking Flatbiller
Mountain Dew Drinking Flatbiller
7 years ago

I’ve have never heard the phrase “Designed by committee” used in a positive light.

DM
DM
7 years ago

Very cool project. The travel and geometry looks spot-on for aggressive trail riding.

I agree that a bottle cage is a must. Although not ideal, they could add a mount on the underside of the downtube. Better than nothing.

TylerB
TylerB
7 years ago

No bottle stays in a bottle cage on rough terrain unless it is physically strapped down. Quite a few of my local trails are littered with water bottles for this reason. Alutech is just looking out for the environment.

xcracer
xcracer
7 years ago

Why is the XL only 20″?

J N H
J N H
7 years ago

@xcracer, in the era of 150mm (and soon 175mm) travel dropper posts why would you realistically want a longer than 20in seat post on a mountain bike? I’m 6ft 5 and ride around on a hardtail with an 18in seat tube and a long dropper, it’s the kind of layout I used to dream of in the days of XL frames having 22in seat tubes and handling like old farm gates.

RickyBob
RickyBob
7 years ago

Rear brake cable routing is sweet.

Mayonayze
Mayonayze
7 years ago

Why is a saddle-rail bottleholder not an option for those that insist on bottles?

greg
greg
7 years ago

very clean. i like that they still left the option for an e-mount front derailleur, either for an actual derailleur or for a little extra single ring insurance with a minimal guide. cant complain about the threaded bb either, although i dont mind well manufactured bb30…

Aaron
Aaron
7 years ago

Manufacturers! Look! Look what the people want! Just make this at a killer price and you will make millions….

I’d personally be interested in a 29″ version but with Boost spacing. Dat bracing angle.

Steve
Steve
7 years ago

The forum group over at Ridemonkey.com did something similar a few years ago. They got New England frame builder Ted Wojcik to build a 29’er with forum feedback.

Brad
Brad
7 years ago

Very clean and sleek looking, would love to try one. But no water bottle kills it for me. Maybe if it was a 160mm+ enduro monster I might be able to deal with it but no way for a 130mm bike.

Adam
Adam
7 years ago

Why are you roadies all whining over a water bottle cage? I haven’t seen a water bottle on a mtn bike in years. Most riders I see and know all use packs, extra storage, water access while riding and crash protection all trump a bottle that would likely fall out when the trail gets going.

Plus if this is designed by mass input then they likely asked for it without.

Darryl
Darryl
7 years ago

Please note other manufacturers; Longer wheelbases are what we are after, not shorty ones.
Just check the geometry specs above.

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