Inspired by the GT mountain bikes from the late 1980’s, German inventor Ulrich Bahr and brother Eric have spent the last 20+ years working to bring their concept of the ultimate mountain bike to fruition. Using their own patent, which was granted in around the time they got started on this project, they’ve gone through several manufacturers, attempted crowdfunding, and finally sold Eric’s house to fund a small run of this: The KineticWorks Quintessence enduro bike.

KineticWorks Quintessence enduro mountain bike with adjustable angles for climbing and descending KineticWorks Quintessence enduro mountain bike with adjustable angles for climbing and descending

The design uses a linkage driven rear suspension that starts on a lower rocker arm. The bottom bracket sits at the other end of that rocker arm, which has two effects depending on whether you’re pedaling or coasting. Pedal hard, and the forces you apply downward pull on the suspension for more efficient movement and better traction. Hit a bump, and they move the BB’s center to keep the pedaling position somewhat static. While that’s a big rocker, and there’s up to 200mm of rear wheel travel, they say the BB only moves a few millimeters and has a stabilizing effect on the system.

KineticWorks Quintessence enduro mountain bike with adjustable angles for climbing and descending

Where the real magic comes into the design is the adjustable angles. Back in the day, Ulrich had a more upright bike and crushed his friends on the climb. Then they crushed him on the descents with their slacker bikes. So the idea was born, why not have a bike that could do both equally well? The connector piece between the rocker, chainstays and seat tube lets you more the upper rocker pivot closer or farther from the seat tube. This effectively drops the BB and slackens the angles…by a LOT.

KineticWorks Quintessence enduro mountain bike with adjustable angles for climbing and descending

These models have a mechanical adjustment, meaning you’d have to stop at the top and wrench it into position. But they mentioned a hydraulically actuated switch as the ideal part here, letting you change geo at the flick of a button.

KineticWorks Quintessence enduro mountain bike with adjustable angles for climbing and descending KineticWorks Quintessence enduro mountain bike with adjustable angles for climbing and descending

The beauty of the design also allows non-traditional drivetrains to be used, like the Pinion internal gear box…which would remove a LOT of unsprung weight from the rear of the bike.

They’re offering it in framesets with various drivetrain options, forks and other parts on their website, including complete bikes with Shimano drivetrains (even an Alfine 11 build).

KineticWorks.de

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jasonmiles31
3 years ago

I like how this bike uses a second idler pulley to have more chain wrap on the CR. It seems like this would also reduce chain growth that the RD would have to take up.

Gillis
Gillis
3 years ago

While I wish them both well in their endeavor, I cringe at the thought that he sold his house for this.

Chris
Chris
3 years ago
Reply to  Gillis

Sell your house for what is essentially a mash up of a Canyon Shape Shifter and a GT I Drive, with a chain sitting right next to the CS waiting to slap and eat and rattle it’s way thru it…man that takes courage (insanity!)

Craig
Craig
3 years ago
Reply to  Gillis

My thoughts exactly.

Shane
Shane
3 years ago
Reply to  Gillis

Thoughts and prayers

UncaJohn
3 years ago

GT was NOT the first to patent a floating BB drivetrain / suspension system!

Bokito
Bokito
3 years ago

The thing that I find really exciting, the hydraulic adjust on the fly, is not featured, neither here, nor on the homepage. I don’t understand why adjustable geometry is not much more of a thing, really. Loved my Scott Ransom, eg.
I really hope this works.

Ol' Shel'
Ol' Shel'
3 years ago

That’s the first time I’ve heard Pinion and ‘remove weight’ in the same sentence.

utahbrain
utahbrain
3 years ago

Correct me if I’m wrong, but ins’t this the same idea as the old unified rear triangle concept we all summarily shunned 20 years ago?!