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Evelo’s Omni Wheel Wants You to Have E-Bike Power On Your Existing Bike

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Evelo-Omni-Wheel

Evelo is an electric bike company that already produces a range of complete e-bikes. To help those that wanted to keep their own bike, or had specific challenges such as cargo bikes, recumbents, or other special rides, they have created the Omni Wheel, which is a simple replacement front wheel incorporating the full battery and motor into one easily installable unit. Because of this, the company claims that almost any bike with a 26″ or 700c wheel can become an e-bike in as little as 30 minutes.

Another benefit they tout is that the Omni Wheel costs significantly less than a complete e-bike, starting at about half of the typical e-bike starting price. The unit also comes with a handlebar-mounted remote to adjust the boost needed, but it is not a throttle, it is only pedal assist, so it complies with e-bike rules and is not considered a motorcycle. It also has a sensor that must be applied around the bottom bracket to work with the pedal-assist function, and then a wire that runs up to the handlebar remote.

The company is ready to deliver the wheel in March of this year, so they are starting to take pre-orders now. Check out the details after the break…

evelo-omni-wheel

Evelo acknowledges that they are not the first to think of this idea, yet they say as a profitable, self-funded e-bike company, they are the first to actually get it done and bring it to market this March. Installation as a front wheel eliminates a lot of the technical hurdles and compatibility issues of a rear wheel, as this product is aimed at commuters or casual cyclists who may not be very technically adept about bicycles.

“For many people, barriers like hills, age, fitness levels, or even the simple inconvenience of getting to work sweaty, prevent them from using a bike for commuting or recreation,” says EVELO CEO Boris Mordkovich. “The Omni Wheel helps riders overcome those, and brings the price point down to $1K level, making use of the bikes that people may already have. And perhaps even more importantly, we are able to tap into our existing experience and infrastructure to streamline production, provide a service network around the country, and deliver our renowned, high level of customer service before and after the sale.”

FEATURES:

• Available in both 26” and 700c sizes
• Lightweight at 19 pounds
• Compatible with caliper, disc and V-brakes
• 350W motor offering max speeds up to 20 mph
• 15-40 mile range: Charge time from 4 hours
• Front-wheel means easier install with no effect on current gearing
• Handlebar-mounted remote included (no smartphone app needed)

The unit sells for $999-$1049 (depending on wheel size) with a 15-25 mile range battery and $1249-$1299 for a 25-40 mile range. All the motors are 350w, which is actually a pretty big motor for e-bikes. The installation video below gives a good idea of how easy it is to set up the Omni Wheel

www.omni.evelo.com

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Ben
Ben
8 years ago

I am not usually one to post negative comments, but I have to wonder how a 19lb front wheel will alter the handling of a bike. Talk about rotational momentum! If you were cooking, it would take a heck of a lot of muscle to turn the handlebars. More than that, it looks downright SCARY in a crosswind.

Frank
Frank
8 years ago

If its 19 lbs, wind will have no effect on it.

I would consider this a good thing overall. Best riding electric bike I’ve used was a front-wheel drive, really pulled through the snow. Batteries were on the back though, so the wheel wasn’t quite so massive.

Rich W.
Rich W.
8 years ago

Never a good idea to steal design cues from Huffy:
http://ratrodbikes.com/forum/index.php?threads/1986-huffy-sigma.68714/

Moove
Moove
8 years ago

It is seriously dangerous to install a hub motor in a fork not made for it. A normal front fork will not stand up to the forces of a pulling motor attached to it. I don’t know about USA but in Europe it is not legal to convert a bike like this unless it is tested according to the EN standard.

Alan
Alan
8 years ago

Looks great for polo!

Michael
Michael
8 years ago

I’m pretty sure there’s a reason people don’t run full discs on the front…something to do with crosswinds on a gusty day. Use your imagination. 😉

David
8 years ago

This seems like an easy install for bikes with the correct associated parts. Square taper BB, round shell style BB area for mounting the sensor, rim brake. Overall though, looks like a nice design. With the fact it is pedal assist with relatively low max speeds (20mph), I don’t see much effect on a fork in good shape. As the product is refined, hopefully we’ll see some multi-bike kits to adapt to different shaped frames and cranks.

topmounter
topmounter
8 years ago

“Lightweight at 19 pounds” is an oxymoron when you are talking about a front bicycle wheel.

And why don’t they design this to be installed into an existing REAR wheel? Sure, the hub and cassette take up a bit more room so you may lose a bit of range, but you gain a ton more stability and don’t lose the ability to wheelie.

Devin
Devin
8 years ago

Just the thing for a idiot a 19 lb Sail attached to your steering. I agree with Moove -Supple road forks would not work well. Might not break the fork but it would flex badly.

a
a
8 years ago

Forks wont flex the force is not applied on it unless you do wheelies then slam it on the ground and you were already at the fork weight limit (ie you’re obese)

The idea doesnt look so bad. Its neither light or cheap tho.

Durianrider
Durianrider
8 years ago

Will this work with my 290 gram carbon fork? Should be right eh?

Doug B
Doug B
8 years ago

would be a great addition to my Surly Big Dummy.

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