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First Look: Let Cars Know Where You Are With The Blaze Laserlight

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Blaze-In-Action

Initally Kickstarted back in 2012, we brought you the idea of Blaze Laserlight, projecting a laser image of a bike in front of the rider. Intended as a safety measure, it lets cars know where you are in a very visible green laser that is visible in an almost 360 degree field of view.

The Blaze sells for $200, which is pretty steep for a 300 lumen bike light, but upon unboxing, it is evident that they have put the thought into the presentation of the product that is in line with other high-end electronic devices such as smartphones. The charging cable is reminiscent of modern Apple devices, and all of the mounting parts are metal.

Take a look inside to see initial reactions from the unboxing and first ride with the Blaze…

Blaze-in-Use

The Blaze Laserlight is interesting to ride with. It can be a bit distracting, as the laser is bright, and out in front of you about 50 feet. It moves around a lot since it is attached to your handlebars, but it is easily visible to cars. Just on the first ride, a car noticed the light, and moved further away. It can cause confusion though, as the laser enters an intersection before the rider, so in the case of a 4-way stop downtown, it entered the middle of the road even as I stopped at the stop sign, and confused a driver as to whether I was going to stop or not. It did help on the greenway as I came up behind a group of pedestrians, and they noticed the light before they saw me, and one even exclaimed “cool bike light!” All of this was just on the first day of use over only a few miles, so it shows that the laserlight performs the basic promised function; it makes you visible.

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The box feels high-quality, with nice glossy sleeve slid around the primary box. It looks attractive, and feels like it contains something worth $200.

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Inside, the products are well packaged and laid out, giving a nice presentation of the product and the included parts as you uncover everything.

 

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Being all metal, and with an integrated battery, the Blaze is not lightweight. However, weight is probably not a concern if you are purchasing a 300 lumen city light. The Blaze includes the mount with rubber shims for different handlebar diameters, a tool, and the special USB cable with magnetic attachment. Since the light is IPX7 waterproof, the cable just uses a magnet to connect to two external tabs for charging, eliminating a port that can allow water entry.

Blaze-Mount Blaze-Mount-in-Use

The quick release may be one of the nicest touches. With the high price of the light, it should be taken inside every time the bike is parked. With a laser though, aiming the light is crucial to put the laser in the right spot. The Blaze has a keyed quick release mounting system that leaves the major part of the mount on the bike, and removes with the simple pull of a trigger. This keyed mounting position is tool adjustable to be able to dial it in, and then keeps the exact same position when you remove and then replace the light through use. The coolest thing about the bracket is that there is a sensor in it that does not allow the laser to work when the light is disconnected from the mount, preventing it from accidentally being pointed at someone.

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Claimed weight is 182 grams, but actual system weight came in at 212 grams, and the lone light at 163 grams.

The Blaze Laserlight comes with a pretty steep price tag for a self-contained 300 lumen light. There are a lot of features and quality packed into it to make it worth that price, but only if those features are important to you. The laser works as advertised, and increases your visibility on the road, so one could call the price a small insurance policy against getting hit by a car, especially if you do your riding at night. It is also rare to find a bike light with this level of quality to the construction. The Blaze is a good buy, if you see the value in the features.

www.blaze.cc

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13 Comments
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joenomad
joenomad
8 years ago

Combine this one with the rear light that shines red lines behind the bike and you got yourself covered as well as can be.

AlanM
AlanM
8 years ago

Why can’t I catch that damn bike in front of me!

WheresWaldo
WheresWaldo
8 years ago

While driving, I generally don’t actually look down at the road, so how would I notice this. Also if you ride on the correct side of traffic, why is the light pointing forward and not backward so drivers coming up have other visual cues that I am there.

Heffe
Heffe
8 years ago

Can you point it down and make the bike appear closer to you?

bongwater
bongwater
8 years ago

Shopmate says, “I’m giving that a firm nope.”

Buy a bright headlight for the same dough.

Mr. P
8 years ago

But can it destroy tie fighters?

P

Adrian
Adrian
8 years ago

What’s the wattage on this thing? Is it an eye safety hazard?

LateSleeper
LateSleeper
8 years ago

Interesting concept, and nice mechanical design. Rather heavy for a 300 lumen light, though. IMHO, 300 lumens is an ok “be seen” intensity but not sufficient to see what you’re riding through/over. I run my TAZ at 750 or 1500 lumens depending on my speed and the ambient light. At those intensities, motorists do see me, and its not clear that a projected green icon will make them see me any better, esp. since it’s being projected someplace where I’m not.

uglyyeti
uglyyeti
8 years ago

First off, US laser regulations are way more stringent than Europe. Can’t imagine this thing has gotten approvals from the FDA-CDRH. If it has, they have a fantastic registration agent.

Secondly, why would you want to distract a driver by projecting an image in front of you? I want drivers looking at me – I don’t care if they run over a laser bike 30ft ahead of me. May as well send every driver a warning text at the very moment they approach your back wheel.

topmounter
topmounter
8 years ago

Does it blind aircraft pilots when you ride a wheelie?

JBikes
JBikes
8 years ago

“Hey a-hole! Use the bike lane/path”
click.
“Hey a-hole! I am! See!”

michael
8 years ago

Lights such as this that project patterns/images on the road are novel at best. It is a small community that would even be aware of a light such as this. As such, it would only prove distracting/confusing to a motorist. Were I to see an image such as this projected on the road (assuming notice would be taken of it at all) I’d not have a clue how to respond.

Cycle wise
Cycle wise
8 years ago

Surely you would think ‘what is that in the road’. Whilst being distracted you then hit the cyclist you didn’t see!

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