2016_Yeti_SB5c_Beti_Side

For Yeti, 2016 is the year of the Beti – the Beti bike that is. Launching a new line of women’s specific mountain bikes, the two models are the feminine counterparts to the beloved SB5c trail machine and swift ASRc 29er. Let it be known that nothing about the Yeti Beti line is girlie, compromised, overlooked, shrinked or pinked (coral yes, but no pink – which matches their women’s apparel, of course). While it may seem that Yeti is late to the female shred program, the company has in fact been committed to the women’s mountain bike scene for over a decade supporting many riders over the years like Julie Furtado, Marla Streb, Tara Llanes, Jill Kintner, and Rosara Joseph. They’ve also been behind the Beti Bike Bash, the first all-women’s xc race by supporting the Yeti Beti race team.

Yeti still hosts this event and drew a 400 person turnout in June which coincided with the release of the Beti bikes. In fact, the Beti line is not much of a departure from what Yeti has already been offering: XS frame options in the complete line. What distinguishes the new Beti bikes is an approach to complete bikes designed for hard-riding, discerning bad ass ladies including a lighter shock tune, lighter wheels, narrower bars, shorter cranks, and shorter travel dropper posts….

2016_Yeti_SB5c_Beti_Profile

First Ride: Yeti Beti SB5c, sixe XS, SRAM XO

Within moments of arriving at the Yeti Cycles headquarters in Golden, CO I was sized up and set up for a ride on the Beti SB5c. I’m 5’2”, 100 lbs with a sadly short inseam of 29”. Yeti’s approach to mountain bike geometry is long and low. The XS was a great fit and I was pleasantly surprised to find the reach I like while also being able to standover the frame, even if by a hair.

BetiSB5c_Cockpit BetiSB5c_Front

I appreciated the room of the cockpit of the Beti SB5c. Yes, I’m a small rider, but that doesn’t mean I want a trail bike that is tiny overall. The “long and low” frame geo offers up a bit more reach, giving my body freedom to move and shift according to where I want the bike to go. When you’re small, you gotta use everything you have!

Yeti is “conveniently” located at the bottom of the Apex Park single track trails. My first acquaintance with the Beti SB5c was a heart pumping, oxygen sucking, technical climb with water bars, switchbacks and rocks to break any momentum. Given the 140mm fork and trail nature of this Beti, I was very impressed with its agility in both the technical and dirt climbs. The rear remained engaged and the front was easy to maneuver through the granite and tight turns. When the ascent was finally more rideable, I found the Beti to move swiftly with XC ground covering feel.

Just when I thought my sea level lungs would explode, I turned my wheels downhill. Grubstake Loop, to Pick & Sledge to Lower Apex offered up a fast descent with switchbacks, waterbars, large technical rocks and drops. Here is where the Beti SB5c shined. While picking through technical sections, the Beti grabbed the trail like a rock crawler even when hard braking. In the open descents, I found her to float with speed while still maintaining confident contact with the trail. My personal Santa Cruz 5010 has a wheel base 1” shorter than this bike (mostly in the reach where I feel too cramped on this bike). This might be why my one and only challenge on the Beti SB5c: it marginally more difficult to slide the rear wheel around while descending switchbacks.

Trail_2 BetiSB5c_Beauty1

Trails like these are bred into the Beti SB5c’s DNA and it shows: nimble and efficient while pedaling, confident and trail-grabbing at all speeds while descending.

Both the Beti SB5c and the ASRc are built with tubeless ready DT Swiss XR 331 rims laced to DT Swiss hubs. These rims weight-saving XC “race” rims and provide plenty of durability for female riders. I only wish Yeti has opted for wider rims which allow you to more reliably lower psi aka find more traction as a smaller rider.

The two bikes also come complete with carbon Easton EC90 bars with a width of 720mm and weighing in at just 130g. Yeti’s “regular” line is built with mostly 740mm wide bars. 720mm is my personal choice for bars on a trail bike. While I’m short, my shoulders are average width for a woman.

Do note that, like the regular SB5c, the Beti SB5c does not have internal cable routing. Yeti says the routing flows well as is but they do plan to accommodate the demand for internal routing in the future.

Both bikes in the Beti line come with a Raceface Turbine cranks with a 170mm arm in the XS, S and M frame options. This is the shortest crank you can get stock for an MTB unless you opt for a DH or Rotor crank.

BetiSB5c_Crank BetiSB5c_bb

The Beti SB5c comes complete with a Thomson dropper post with 100mm of travel. Many droppers have a 120mm of travel. The shorter travel is necessary for smaller riders that ride with less seat post exposed- that way the seat doesn’t go past your ideal saddle height when the dropper is extended and you already have the post slammed.

BetiSB5c_DropperPost Beti_Seat

The saddle on both bikes is a Yeti branded WTB saddle. It was surprisingly…just fine. Do note that my ride lasted under two hours. It’s not as wide as my sits bones measure but that’s OK for two reasons: A. this is a trail bike get out of the saddle and work it! B. you may not want your MTB saddle to be as wide as your optimum fitting road saddle. It’s important that the saddle is not so wide that it prevents you from shifting your hips back.

BetiSB5c_InfinityLink BetiSB5c_Suspension

At the soul of the Beti SB5c’s confident ride is Yeti’s proprietary rear suspension design, Switch Infinity. While the tech can easily go over one’s head, in my experience I’ve come to a few conclusions: full suspension is worth every penny, single pivot can be like a bucking bronco, DW Link has great cornering and VPP climbs well. Yeti’s Switch Infinity seems to marry the best of DW Link and VPP: stiff for pedaling and climbing which still managing to offer a responsive ride and great small bump compliance for trail contact. I gotta give it to Yeti for the R&D (with love from Fox) and investment they commit to this suspension design which has evolved over the years. Not pictured on the SB5c are the Maxis Ardent 2.4 upfront and Maxxis Ikon 2.2 on the back.

2016_Yeti_ASRc_Beti_Profile

First Look: Yeti Beti ASRc

Given my meager size, preference for trail descents and very poor attempts at racing xc, I opted to ride the SB5c 27.5 but did not overlook the Beti ASRc. The aesthetics of this 29er are badass. The internal routing, low weight (for a full-suspension) and 29″ wheels make the Beti ASRc look like it would eat XC trail fast. While I don’t enjoy the ride of most single-pivot rear suspensions, I do understand Yeti’s motivation in opting for this design in the ASRc: it’s lighter.

The Beti ASRc rocks mostly the same female-minded components as the Beti SB5c but with a few XC-centric finishes including a Thomson Elite post, and Maxxis Ikon 2.2 front & rear tires.

2016_Yeti_SB5c_Beti_Frame_2 2016_Yeti_SB5c_Beti_Frame_1

2016_Yeti_ASRc_Beti_Frame_2 2016_Yeti_ASRc_Beti_Frame_1

The Takeaway: Yeti Beti

Here’s the deal: the female market in cycling, especially on trails where there are less ladies than on the road, is challenging. In an effort to encourage more ladies to pick up mountain biking, many bikes are designed to be beginner and wallet friendly. High-end women’s mountain bikes don’t move very fast out of shops and the investment to a dedicated category from leading manufacturers isn’t justified. I get it, but what this adds up to is a limited selection of highly capable and thoughtfully-spec’d complete bikes for smaller and/or lighter riders. I personally struggle to find any complete bike with less than four parts that don’t need swapping to accommodate my fit. The Yeti Beti answers this call. While my preference is for the SB5c, both bikes are built ready-to-shred.

Yeti Beti bikes will be available starting June 25, with the Beti ASRc X01 build going for $5,799 and the Beti SB5c X01 build selling for $6,899.

– Brooke Summers

Yeti Beti SB5c Geometry:

Yeti Beti sb5c geometry

 

Yeti Beti ASRc Geometry:

Yeti Beti asrc geometry

yeticycles.com

Yeti2016

 

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JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

Hey (wo)man, no sliding on the trails! Really though, on non-actively managed/non-dedicated mtb trails such Apex Park or the like, it really causes a lot of erosion/wear. With the amount of users the CO Frontrange gets, its bad practice. And it not like you are getting timed and paid for said time so no real need to do it if it can be avoided.

blantonator
blantonator
6 years ago

In what world is a 68* head tube a XC geometry? Anyone else tired of manufactures putting out slack angle XC bikes? Am I the only one riding the east coast still?

Doug B
Doug B
6 years ago

+1 @JBikes, “slide the rear” comment made me cringe. Roll the corners no ruin them.

internet stoke
internet stoke
6 years ago

Shut up about Apex. They already jackhammered the only hard parts of PnS.

Also, It’s actively managed and maintained by JeffCo, riders like myself, and the Friends of Apex group. Thanks again to FOA for fixing the shite waterbar mess up PnS, and some other small bits I’ve seen getting fixed.

More people need to do trail work, not less riding.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

internet stoke – Apex Park is a county park and is a heavily used multi-use trail that is used and (thankfully) maintained to some degree by the mtb community.

I agree that more people need to ride and do trail work. But, trails like Apex Park are decidedly different than something like Winter Park or Keystone – in which they are purposely designed and maintained for heavy mtb use. Apex is “actively maintained” like any other county park – and that is not in a manner that’s done on the frequency needed if everyone that went there slid through all the corners.

Want to slide, head to something like Winter Park and pay. When on a county park, even one well maintained, don’t slide around unless you are stopping immediately to fix damage done by said slide. Not only is it rude to non-mtb users, but to other bikers that just a see scraped/rutted trail

badbikemechanic
badbikemechanic
6 years ago

I would like a boy’s geo version in that pink please YETI.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

I will add that FOA (Friends of Apex) and like-minded riders (like internet stoke above) is a model to which all other mtb communities should strive. They literally saved PnS trail at Apex, which is rare where decreased access is often pushed.
I haven’t been up Apex this year…just too busy 🙁

internet stoke
internet stoke
6 years ago

Either way I hope that red color comes in the regular SB’s.

von.kruiser
von.kruiser
6 years ago

blantonator is totally right.

Dream bike(s) not available today:
1. Super light weight hardtail w/ relaxed geometry. 27+/29 frame. Room for 3.0 tires, 45mm asymmetrical OD rims, 120mm fork travel. Single front but double compatible (bikepacking). 31.6 so a dropper can be installed (27.2mm is a deal breaker).
2. Same as above but full suspension (120mm FT/R).

NOTE: XC is for racing w/ 70º HT angle… The majority of us want a trail (not enduro) super light bike w/ relax geometry and more then 100mm travel (120mm is perfect). All brands are missing the boat. We have plenty 140mm travel bikes. Looks like brands forgot about trail bikes. It’s either XC Racing or Enduro or 140mm bikes which are not needed… or stuck w/ 29er specific. However I could easily live w/ 100mm as long at the frame is relaxed geometry w/ a dropper and lightweight frame/build.

von.kruiser
von.kruiser
6 years ago

Sorry did not mean that 140mm bikes are not needed since it’s a great all-round bike. Just saying we already have XC, 140, Enduro which are all great… A lot of riders live where it’s steep up and down but do not need all the travel… but XC is to steep angles or stuck on 29er only. Want something fun and light. Does not have to be 27+ but it’s nice since you can run 3.0 down to 2.35 on a 45mm rim… or just put in a 29er wheelset for trucking. Do it all bike w/ out all the travel and weight w/ dropper post. This bike does not exist but I know it’s coming and hopefully this year… but guessing not till two seasons from now. Sorry for rattling on, on a side subject.

JBikes
JBikes
6 years ago

von.kruiser – not sure how light a frame you are looking for, but it seems you want a new Jamis Dragonslayer. I know I do. I’m sure you could get one to 25 lbs, maybe less in thinner tire form.

Chader
Chader
6 years ago

@von.kruiser
Seems like the Trek Fuel EX might fit your list?
Or maybe a Specialized Camber Evo, but it leans a bit more trail with the Pike?

an_687
an_687
6 years ago

@von.kruiser – The Specialized Fuse seems to be worth checking out, too. The pro level seems to have good spec.

Unravelled
Unravelled
6 years ago

This is so dumb. This is just a pink men’s bike. There’s nothing that makes this a woman’s bike besides the paint job.

What’s the point?

von.kruiser
von.kruiser
6 years ago

Chader – Problem w/ a lot of the new Boost bikes nobody is talking about is you can only run a single front. Specialized can only run single, not sure about Trek but it might be the same. In the easiest gear, chain rubs on the tire. The dragon slayer was designed right w/ Boost which runs a double, but I think it’s the exception. I’m afraid most bike brands coming out w/ Boost got it wrong w/ single only frame designs. Boost might not be the answer we were all looking for but hopefully I’m wrong.

JBikes is right w/ the dragonslayer being best of all worlds for the price. Not the lightest but does it all… they just need a carbon or alloy frame, double, 31.8 post and light parts option… but again that will be next season it seems.

kt
kt
6 years ago

So, according to the chart, the standover height for an XS bike (fitting a 4’11” woman) is 29.5″? Really? So a 4’11” woman with a 30.5″ inseam (yeah, like THAT’s happening!) would fit this bike? I am a 5’2″ XC rider of 20 years with many bikes under my belt. When I look for a new on I simply scan the Standover stats. Anything under 28″ is my huckleberry. The rest are themselves.

Rideforlife
Rideforlife
6 years ago

Great review, one of the best written I have ever read.
Girls rule!

elvis
elvis
6 years ago

regarding ht angle, maybe just maybe since Yeti is HQ’d in Colorado, the bikes just might be designed for the terrain in the general area? I prefer the slack angles for my regional riding/racing, you don’t. neither of us is “right”.

Also, regarding standover… why on earth would you focus on that? Are you using it as a strider? (half serious question)

disenchantedbytheindustry
disenchantedbytheindustry
6 years ago

Is this the stupidest name for a bike? Maybe not, but it makes me want to puke almost as much as the paint on this otherwise awesome looking bike. It’s enough for me to pass it up for something else. Marketing departments are still missing the mark. Le sigh…

Tia
Tia
6 years ago

These are just painted “coral” color standard bikes. You pinked it but forgot to shrink it. I’m 5’1″ and the XS is way too big since my standover height is 28″. I understand you have molds already made, but come on you might as well make some aluminum bikes for women that actually fit small women.

The only difference is paint color, grips, narrow bars and saddle. Otherwise it is the same product line. Most women already like the Yeti teal color, and the “Beti” script is too 1985-Footloose-ish-cheeseball IMHO.

Custard
Custard
6 years ago

Yeti Beti – Classic case of pink it and shrink it. Really patronising.