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Five Ten gets a grip on leather commuter cycling shoes, plus killer new approach shoes

Five Ten District leather commuter bike shoes
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Five Ten District leather commuter bike shoes

The Five Ten District is a new urban casual commuter shoe that comes in flat pedal and SPD versions. The Upper is a PU-coated leather, so water will roll right off and it’s super durable. Bottom has a siped Stealth Marathon non-marking rubber outsole. It’s not quite as sticky as their climbing rubber, but it’ll last longer. It has a high rubber content, too, so it damps vibration really well (they say better than Vibram and other similar materials), so it’ll be more comfortable on long rides.

Five Ten District leather commuter bike shoes

Five Ten District leather commuter bike shoes

Prices are $90 for flats, $100 for clipless. Available by August in Ivy and Black.

Not shown, there’s a new Freerider Kids Velcro shoe that takes the lace up version and converts to three Velcro straps. It’s the same as the adult version with the Marathon non-marking rubber outsole. Retail is $70, available in July. Sizes from 10.5 kids to 3 youth.

The Guide Tennie model was introduced in the late ‘80s as a hybrid between a climbing shoe and approach shoe, able to be used for light hiking and recreational climbing. It was designed by their guides, and it’s evolved over the years into more and more of a tennis shoe similar to the Access.

Now, they’ve taken it back to its roots and made it a proper approach shoe that works as a climbing shoe on cabled routes and bouldering. There’s more padding around the ankle and heel, laces run far down to the toe, and the toe box is more naturally shaped to accommodate your foot’s natural shape. It uses their C4 Stealth Rubber, which is their top climbing rubber. $120, available in July, men’s and women’s. It would make a good riding shoe, too.

Access has a new women’s model that’ll come in leather and mesh versions that’ll be available this fall. It has a lower volume, women’s specific last with a snugger heel and a bit shorter achilles heel cup. Retail is $130-$140, with Stealth S1 rubber, same as what’s on a lot of their flat pedal bike shoes.

Coming next year, they’re adding a knit construction that’ll be the first time they’ve used that type of upper. It’ll be available on the Access and this new Sleuth Slip On that’s coming in January.

FiveTen.com

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Garrett
Garrett
5 years ago

The district looks the business, and may be a good gravel shoe when I don’t want my full on free riders.

Mike A
Mike A
5 years ago

Cautiously optimistic about the District. I’d love a commuter shoe that doesn’t suck.

mike
mike
5 years ago

And there is my new work shoes!

Poul Hansen
Poul Hansen
5 years ago

It would be nice if you for the new models like the Tennie, would point out how to spot the new model, as there are a lot of the old ones and the sellers never put manufacturing date on the shoes and the manufacturer never puts a version number on the shoe.

It looks like the new Tennie has 8(9) lace holes each side, and the old only 6(7)

Dockboy
Dockboy
5 years ago

Those District shoes are great in blue!

Nick
Nick
5 years ago

If the districts grab on the heel better than the Chrome Truk Pro, they can take my money!

Bert
Bert
5 years ago

Was about to buy my kid some new Freerider Kids, but I’ll wait for the Velcros….great call on velcro

Nat
Nat
5 years ago

Can you walk in the SPD Districts without your cleat grinding against the ground? That’s what I want in an SPD commuter shoe.

mudrock
mudrock
5 years ago
Reply to  Nat

That’s what I wonder also, the cleat recess doesn’t look very deep.

s
s
5 years ago
Reply to  Nat

That’s always the question.
Most of the DZR shoes don’t grind, they just fall apart. The Giro Rumble VR doesn’t grind. The Chrome shoes seem to be made to grind against the ground. That’s all with Time cleats.

I’d agree with mudrock that the District recess doesn’t look that deep, though it does look like solid shoe. The other Five Ten SPD I tried, the cleat didn’t grind, but wearing the shoes felt like I was wearing a wooden clog.

Josh
Josh
5 years ago

Could someone explain to me why you “need” clippless for commuting? Freeriders in the summer, freerider eps in the winter. Chesters 24/365.

Greg
Greg
5 years ago
Reply to  Josh

Josh, after years of using the Turk’s I could never go back, but there are several reasons.

1) I have long hill segments on my ride, and sometimes I am late and need to skip breakfast, being able to switch muscle groups is a like heaven on those days.

2) I deal with train tracks, and need to hop up onto sidewalks that lack curb cuts due to poorly planned bike routes, particularly relating to draw bridges. I can reliably bunny hop with clipless even when I am tired so it has a much wider safety margin.

3) My monkey brain is hard wired to use clip-less after decades of doing so, and I like my shins.

4) It makes my commute faster.

While it is unscientific and just anecdote I have yet to meet someone who didn’t do BMX for a decade or more that will go back to flats after 6 months of commuting/utility biking with clip-less.

typevertigo
typevertigo
5 years ago
Reply to  Josh

Not a particular “need,” but it’s always nice to have options.

I commute in Shimano RT33s.

tim
tim
4 years ago

would the districts
work for xc

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