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Fizik One-To-One Custom 3D-Printed Saddles Use Quick GebioMized Pressure Fit: Review

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante padding straight out of the 3d-printed
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After hinting at the potential for individual rider customization with their first 3D-printed Adaptive saddles, Fizik One-to-One finally delivers that full custom saddle fit. Powered by proven GebioMized saddle pressure mapping, the true innovation is just how easy Fizik has made the custom fitting process. Developed to be simple and fast, Fizik will measure you on your bike, then custom print a saddle to meet your specific support needs. It’s not cheap, but it’s also not that expensive – as little as 15% more than the cost of their previous top-tier Adaptive saddle.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's getting a custom saddle fitting
(All photos/Cory Benson)

We were intrigued. So I got fitted. I got a custom saddle made. And I’ve been riding it for the past 2 months. And the custom fit really does deliver on comfort.

Fizik One-To-One custom 3D-printed bicycle saddle

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante R1 complete

3D-printed saddle padding basically made 2 main claims from the start. 1, it meant that every separate zone of a saddle could offer a unique level of support, depending on how much was needed in each area. And 2, since the padding was printed one at a time, the only thing stopping each saddle from being custom printed for each rider was a need to collect individual rider data and design a padding structure tailored to that rider.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante R1 vs. a standard Aliante Adaptive
Cory’s new custom 1-to-1 Aliante Adaptive (l) vs. a standard Aliante Adaptive (r)

So first, Fizik developed their stock 3D-printed saddle line with the entire (and recently growing) Adaptive range. Its zonal cushioning offers stiffer support under the sit bones where you need it, but less resistance against soft tissue. It’s a pretty big deal, and the driver behind Specialized’s similar Mirror saddles. Both based on piles of averaged rider position data, matching rider physiology with targeted support structures in the padding.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante 155mm selection

Then, Fizik worked on individual customization.

GebioMized pressure mapping made simple

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's asymmetric pressure map

The main obstacle to making a custom fit saddle available to the masses was collecting individual rider fit data.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, original GebioMized pressure sensor setup

So, Fizik when to the company that was already doing it on a smaller scale. German company GebioMized has been using their unique patented pressure mapping system for 20+ years to measure real live pressures between the cyclist & saddle. A big part of that is used for refining rider position on the bike and matching the best existing saddle to the rider. I did a GebioMized pressure map fit 4 years ago, and lowered peak pressure by 20% – a real game changer. But I stuck with one of their stock saddle shapes and padding.

The trouble is/was, it was a long fit process, and required about 90 minutes with a skilled bike fitter. Not a low-cost process, and easy to add at least $200+€ to the cost of a saddle. Still totally worth it in my mind for a committed cyclist, though.

An interesting aside, Czech custom saddle maker Posedla got around the complex data collection process with a much lower-tech solution to bring custom fit 3D-printed saddles to market two years ago, at a slightly lower price.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, new Fizik+GebioMized pressure sensor mat

But, Fizik worked with GebioMized and their pressure sensor tech to make the process faster and easier.

One-on-One, step-by-step

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, fit at multiple riding positions on the hoods

So, Fizik worked with GebioMized to create a simple smartphone app-based setup that can collect rider pressure data quickly and get you on the right saddle for customization. All you have to do is pop into one of the select Fizik fit studios with your own bike, get a fast pressure fit test in about 15 minutes or less to create a custom 3D-padding profile unique to the individual support needs of your body on your bike.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's getting custom fit

To do that, you roll your bike on to a Wahoo roller trainer that grabs your front wheel. Fizik puts their new 64-point Bluetooth pressure sensor mat on top of your current saddle. You ride for a minute in a few positions to get a general pressure map profile.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's in-app fit process

The app suggests what saddle shape and width seems most appropriate.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, other rider selected Argo saddle shape

So then, the bike shop will swap in the standard Fizik saddle in that shape. And they rerun the pressure map test. The resulting pressure readout is then sent to Fizik, where their parametric design system adjusts their honeycomb padding structure to offer support where you need it, and soft structure where you don’t.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante in the Carbon Inc printer

You pick which saddle rails you want, and then, Fizik adds it to the 3D-printer queue.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, padding straight out of the printer

The saddle padding gets printed (which takes about half a day), and then ultimately attached to a stock shell.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante R1 saddle complete

And then delivered back to you to ride a full custom saddle.

So how does it feel & how does it ride?

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Bikerumor in Fizik HQ getting custom fit

I went to Italy a little over two months ago and got my own custom fit, 3D-printed Fizik One-to-One Adaptive saddle. The process put me on a wide 155mm Aliante saddle shape, which I would not have thought of. And it identified an imbalance that me saw putting more pressure on the right side.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's asymmetric pressure data detail

And the saddle it created is distinctly asymmetrical in its padding stiffness. There is even a super soft area on the middle of the left side where it feels like there is almost no support, but which corresponds to my pressure readings.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's symmetric custom 1-to-1 Aliante padding
(look close at Cory’s asymmetric hex density)

The Fizik One-to-One Adaptive saddle does not correct any fit issue or correct imbalance that you currently have, it simply responds to the pressure from your sitting positions, and accommodates that with matching support.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante R1 on Equator gravel bike

So, I have been riding most of my road and gravel rides for the past several weeks on this saddle and I can say the fit is great. I don’t feel like I have the flexibility to move around as much on the saddle as I normally would on a flatter saddle. But I am perfectly content to just sit in place and spin, in total comfort.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's test riding

I know it’s not cheap. And I know for cyclists with multiple bikes, the thought of spending five hundred bucks on every saddle is a bit wild. But we spend so much time sitting on a saddle. I think it is really worth putting in the extra effort to optimize comfort under your butt.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante R1 189g actual weight

Fizik One-to-One Adaptive saddle – Pricing, options & availability

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, GebioMized pressure mat

The new Fizik One-to-One 3D-printed Adaptive saddles are available now when you get a custom fit in one of their select 25 worldwide dealers already equipped with the special trainer and pressure-mapping tech. Get fit, and get a custom saddle.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, sizes shapes and pricing options

The saddles themselves are available in six shapes on carbon-reinforced shells, and 2 widths each, from road to gravel to XC to triathlon.

And pricing is $499 / 459€ for the R3 series with ti Kium rails, or $599 / 499€ for R1 with full carbon rails to save a few grams. Fizik chose not to offer a custom One-to-One Adaptive saddle at the full carbon 00 level, as the additional stiffness does not ensure the same rider comfort afforded by the custom fitting.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante R1, order now

All saddles are made-to-order (obviously) in the northern Italy factory headquarters of Fizik. And once ordered and paid for through your local shop, Fizik will either ship it directly to you. Or you can have it sent to the Fizik dealer shop where they will do a follow-up pressure mapping test to show how your saddle pressure has improved.

Fizik One-To-One Adaptive custom 3D-printed carbon bicycle saddle, Cory's custom 1-to-1 Aliante R1 in profile

You’ll be riding on a custom 3D-printed saddle about 2 weeks after you get your custom fit.

Fizik.com/one-to-one

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Larry Falk
Larry Falk
1 month ago

Could really be useful for people who have genetic or injury asymmetries that can’t be ‘fixed’ with traditional bike fitting techniques.

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
1 month ago

Hey Corey, thanks for the in-depth review. One thing I was hoping that you would address is how, for a given saddle model and width, the 1 to 1 custom version compares to the non-custom version. In your 3rd pic down, you show the custom Aliante Adaptive, next to the regular one, but I am curious if you have actually put any miles in on the regular one and how it feels to you in terms of comfort. Any further insight you can offer in that department?

I ask because you mentioned usually riding flatter and narrower saddles, and so I would like to separate your comfort level changes simply from switching to a new model (the Aliante Adaptive), vs the additional step of the 1 to 1 custom adjustments to the padding.

Mike K.
Mike K.
1 month ago
Reply to  TheKaiser

This is a great question.

Gerald
Gerald
1 month ago

I’m curious on how long these and other 3Dsaddles will last. Being plastic it looks like over time there is the potential to crack in the web design due to due to ultraviolet rays, fatigue,and just drying out over time.
Everybody has their own taste but I am not a fan of the design as if reminds me of BMX saddles back in the 80″s. My l brother had a red one and it wasn’t long until is busted up everywhere.

wakoboom
wakoboom
29 days ago
Reply to  Gerald

a cursory search doesn’t show a different warranty period for these vs their other saddles (24 months) but I am also very curious about this. Seems like it would have to be at least the same 24 mo period that it’ll be guaranteed for.

Ced
Ced
6 days ago
Reply to  Gerald

I have 3 years daily use with the Specialized Saddle – other than it being annoying to clean all those nooks and crannies ( I use a pressure washer with a fan tip and bottle brush), it’s actually held up incredibly well. Even better than one with a leather/fabric cover by this point. No fading or cracks in the 3D printed material. If you crash and compromise the shell, I imagine it would do really poorly though. I’m a big rider and live in a sunny climate too.

Oliver
Oliver
1 month ago

The title and general advertising for this are a bit misleading. It’s not a custom 3d printed saddle. It’s a custom 3D printed saddle cover on completely standard stock shells. So you’re not actually getting a saddle size and shape to suit you specifically at all. Just padding that will – maybe.

Peter Pedal
Peter Pedal
29 days ago

Pretty cool. This is one step closer to the natural next step of being able to print a custom saddle from a picture of a rider’s gooch/hole area. Get the ball rolling and email training data to Cory.

Dude
Dude
29 days ago

I have ischiatic bones wild asymmetry due to a previous fracture, surely going to put my bucks into one of this to see if it helps… looks really promising

Ed LLorca
Ed LLorca
28 days ago

Great idea but the price is uobtanium…

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