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Flying Machine Finalizes 3D Printed Titanium Models, Launches UCX-Ti, F-One-S & F-One-C5

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F-One-S-3D-printed,-titanium,-04Flying Machine has been teasing us with the progression of their 3D printed titanium-lugged bikes by showing us the early idea, and more recently showing us a closer glimpse to production. Now they are ready to start ramping up and taking orders for multiple models.

It is not common to see titanium under paint, and the bold mutli-tone schemes lend to the seamless appearance of the invisible joint possible through the 3D printing process. Have a look in to see the 3 new models…

F-One-S-3D-printed,-titanium,-01F-One-S is a smooth, silent single speed featuring Gates Belt Drive. Every Flying Machine has fully custom, made to order geometry which is the primary benefit to 3D printing the lugs, they can be changed to every customer. F-One-S-3D-printed,-titanium,-06

Including White Industries M15 hubs and Fizik saddle and bar tape, the F-One-S has a base price of $4,080 AUD.

F-One-C5-3D-printed,-titanium,-01 F-One-C5-3D-printed,-titanium,-03

The F-One-C5 uses the same frame with made to order lugs and geometry, and moves to FM Carbon 5 Spoke wheels for $5,435 AUD.

 3DP-UCX---custom-titanium-bike01

For those seeking a comfortable riding position, the UCX-Ti changes the design slightly to also give better vibration damping. Also adding disc brakes and a Shimano Alfine 11 speed Di2 hub, the UCX creeps up to $6,000 AUD.

3DP-UCX---custom-titanium-bike18 3DP-UCX---custom-titanium-bike06

Flying Machine seems to be all about presentation, taking the visual impact to a place that brings the whole bike together. On their website, each model has a long list of options for custom configuration, so the models we see are most likely considerably higher in price than the quoted starting prices.

F-One-HD-3D-printed,-titanium,-04 F-One-HD-3D-printed,-titanium,-11

These great display models really show their capability, and its still impressive how they are able to use 3D printing to create a custom bike that looks seamless. No doubt, their partnership with CSIRO (the Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organization) is what can make this possible, since the economics of a small bicycle company owning a 3D Titanium printer are still not achievable for most.

F-One-HD-3D-printed,-titanium,-01Covered earlier in the year, the F-One-HD is also finalized and ready for delivery to customers like the rest of the line, and the disc brake single speed will start at $4,380 AUD.

www.flyingmachine.com.au

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14 Comments
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-Rizza
-Rizza
8 years ago

$AUD x 0.87 = $USD at today’s exchange rate

Pedals
Pedals
8 years ago

Do people still buy single speeds that cost this much?

Antipodean_G
8 years ago

These are a great example of local design (in a country where this sort of thing is the exception, not the norm) and going outside ‘the box’, a place where an awful lot of the bike industry resides. I think they look great, I am sure ride a treat but I do have to ask… that much cash for what are pretty basic spec bikes? It’s sorta missing the mark in my book.

Joshua Murdock
8 years ago

Wow… all of them look good. Really good.

john
john
8 years ago

i’m not an expert in 3D printing and perhaps its all just a cost issue (and this are already a bit on the pricey side, which is to be expected) but why can’t you 3D print the frame as a single piece?

wheelz
wheelz
8 years ago

This shows a lot of promise and seems like a perfect application for 3d metal printing. I’m guessing that it’s a lot cheaper to only print the lugs rather than the whole thing. I wonder how much sanding they need to do to prep the printed parts for paint? Is it difficult to sand titanium?

Antipodean_G
8 years ago

@john @wheelz, the biggest single issue is the printing bed size for most metal printing, they are fairly small, in the 300mmx300mm size.

The second thing is a tube it super strong due to the process used to make it (as well as the inherent strength of the shape itself). 3D printing is a lot closer to investment casting or similar – the parts are strong but not in the way that you’d want a tube to be; at least not in the weight to strength ratios you want for a bicycle tube. If you wanted to 3D print a whole bike, it would have to be done in sections and the design would have to be totally different – ie. no tubes.

greg
greg
8 years ago

while nice, i feel that by 3d printing the lugs, it could be so much more. gradual transitions, internal and/or external webbing, etc.

anonymous
anonymous
8 years ago

Combine 80’s frame building technology with a 3d printer and updated paint and you get this.

dean
dean
8 years ago

Are those square taper cranks? Why?

Pascii
Pascii
8 years ago

why only single speeds? why? why?

Poncho
Poncho
8 years ago

A cursory glance at their webpage & GUESS WHAT!!!??? You can option for geared hubs…

At the Derek Zoolander Center For Children Who Can’t Read Good And Wanna Learn To Do Other Stuff Good Too, we teach you that there’s more to life than being really, really ridiculously good-looking.

Hotep
Hotep
8 years ago

Bravo Poncho..Bravo.

Ricardo Marquez
Ricardo Marquez
4 years ago

Flying Machine..pretty creative. Ever hear of FMF from Motocross aka Flying Machine Factory from the 70’s to today

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