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Fyxation pedals through the cold w/ new Mesa MP Subzero winter flat pedal

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Are you the type not to let a little snow from getting out for a ride? To you, below freezing temperatures are no big deal? Well if those criteria apply and you’re a fan of flat pedals, Fyxation has a new option. Called the Mesa MP Subzero, these flat pedals are specially built to withstand the winter elements so you can ride all year.

Fyxation pedals through the cold w/ new Mesa MP Subzero winter flat pedal

How do these differ from their popular Mesa MP flats? Well, the start with the same thin nylon body with a maximum height of 14mm. Other than being quite durable and light, here the nylon has another benefit – heat retention. Not in the pedals, but in your feet. Often, a cold metal pedal can actually draw the heat right out of your shoe or boot in the winter leading to colder feet. Fyxation claims that the nylon body is better for retaining heat in your shoes for more comfortable riding.

To prevent the harsh, salty winter environment from rusting away your pedals, the Subzero pedals also have a few additions. Starting with the spindle, the chromoly spindle has been electroplated to prevent rust and the pedal runs on sealed bearings and DU bushings for longevity. The replaceable stainless steel traction pins have also been electroplated for increased durability.

Fyxation pedals through the cold w/ new Mesa MP Subzero winter flat pedal Fyxation pedals through the cold w/ new Mesa MP Subzero winter flat pedal Fyxation pedals through the cold w/ new Mesa MP Subzero winter flat pedal Fyxation pedals through the cold w/ new Mesa MP Subzero winter flat pedal

Together with a 105mm wide platform that should play nice with bulky winter footwear, the Mesa MP Subzero looks pretty enticing for winter riding. Available in four colors, the pedals sell for $69.95 a set and are available now.

Specs:

  • High impact nylon body built to take abuse
  • Smooth running sealed bearing and DU bushing
  • Electroplated cro-moly spindle
  • Electroplated stainless steel replaceable pins for added grip with shoes or boots
  • Nylon body doesn’t suck heat out of your feet like alloy pedals do
  • Installs with 15mm open end wrench or 8mm hex wrench
  • Pin Spec – M3x0.5 x 7.5mm
  • Spindle Thread: 9/16
  • Height: 14mm
  • Width: 105mm
  • Weight: 351g/pair
  • Color: Black/Black, Gray/Black, Black/Blue, Black/Orange
  • Pin Kits: Stainless steel pin kits available soon for use with existing Mesa MP pedals or other replaceable pin pedals on the market

fyxation.com

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Mike Williams
Mike Williams
6 years ago

I really, really, like this price for a large pedal (full disclosure:I own a set of Crank Brothers Stamp pedals which are grossly overpriced and, given they didn’t last 12 months before needing replacing under warranty, poor quality).

But I am going to throw the challenge (aka BS) flag on the heat retention. Yes your alloy pedals>>crank>>BB>>frame could make for a near infinite heat sync but that heat energy is going to have to transfer (principally via conduction) from your foot thru a liner sock, thermal sock, foot bed, thermal boot liner, and the (e.g. Vibram) sole of your boot to the contact point with the nylon pedal the 8 or so metal pins first. And the nylon pedal is still going to be at ambient temperature anyway (unless there is some sort of nano-furnace built in to it).

freddy the finger
freddy the finger
6 years ago
Reply to  Mike Williams

Yeah, but, team sky is about marginal gains.

Fred Gravelly
Fred Gravelly
6 years ago
Reply to  Mike Williams

I’ll second that BS alarm. How much of a difference is it going to make in sub zero weather?

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
6 years ago
Reply to  Mike Williams

I’ve wondered that same thing, however I can tell you that these guys didn’t just invent the idea to come up with a marketing bullet point. I’ve been hearing the same “composite pedals are warmer” idea from fat bike riders for years. It really does seem that there would be so much insulation around the foot as to make it irrelevant.

There are a couple of similar phenomena, which I think are legit from personal experience though. There is the “cleat area of the shoe is colder” in clipless shoes/boots, due to the metal, but in that case the level of insulation between metal and foot is generally hugely less, unless you’re running some wolvehammers or something like that. Then there is the “metal brake levers are colder than carbon”. Again, most gloves are a lot thinner in the palm than boots are in the sole, but at this level there seems to be merit to the concern. You often see cold weather expedition riders who use aluminum levers or bar ends wrapping them with friction or cork tape for this reason.

Mike M.
Mike M.
6 years ago
Reply to  Mike Williams

The ‘plastic’ pedal will draw a lot less heat out of the contacting shoe because of it’s bad thermal conduction.
It’s actually a thermal insulator, where Aluminium is a thermal conductor.
And you don’t need the conduction into cranks and bottom bracket when there is so much cold air around and so much surface of the Ali pedal making it a pretty good heatsink.

Antney
Antney
6 years ago

They are pretty with the ano & all, but I’ll stick with my wider, One Up composites, for $20 less.

networkman
networkman
6 years ago

I just increase the preload on the bearings to generate heat from friction, it warms the axle and then the pedal. (how’s that for BS)

Izzy M
Izzy M
6 years ago

They should bring down the price to $50 if they want to be competitive (e.g., with the OneUp composite and the Kona Wah Wah II).
Does anybody have the length of these? I’ve only seen the width mentioned in all the articles I’ve read.

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