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Giro Sector combines Synchwire & BOAs for top level off-road XC & Gravel Shoe

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Now that Giro has honed their composite layered construction for the road, it looks like the off-road crowd is about to get their fix. Most recently highlighted on the Giro Imperial road shoe, Giro’s Synchwire one-piece composite layered uppers make for a super light shoe that offers zero stretch while still being breathable and supportive. And now with a slightly different construction and lugged outsole, the Giro Sector is ready to take to the dirt.

Giro Sector combines Synchwire & BOAs for top level off-road XC & Gravel Shoe

Starting with a three layer construction, the one piece upper includes monofilament mesh, reinforced and thermally welded Teijin TPU, and synthetic fiber mashed up into a sheet so that there is zero stretch. When combined into a single preformed upper with heat and pressure, the construction can be better tuned by zone so the shoe is able to provide support where you need it and massive ventilation where you don’t.

From the looks of it, the Sector has fewer ventilation windows than the Imperial which makes sense. The off road shoe needs to be more durable. To that point there are reinforcement at the toe and heel to prevent the Synchwire material from wearing.

Giro Sector combines Synchwire & BOAs for top level off-road XC & Gravel Shoe

Like the Imperial, you’ll find two BOA dials, this time with L6 dials which offer 1mm adjustment and macro release. The steel laces are routed through soft lace guides for better fit and lighter weight.

Giro Sector combines Synchwire & BOAs for top level off-road XC & Gravel Shoe

Underneath, you’ll find a dual injected rubber outsole on top of a carbon composite 2-bolt cleat plate. You’ll have the option for toe spikes up front, for when things get really greasy.

Inside, there’s a 3D molded footbed with medium arch support and Aegis antimicrobial treatment. The whole shoe is claimed to weigh 342g for a 42.5, or 323g for a 39.5 women’s.

Giro Sector combines Synchwire & BOAs for top level off-road XC & Gravel Shoe

Available in men’s and women’s sizing, men’s will be offered in 39-50 in whole sizes, and 42.5-45.5 in half sizes. Women’s will be available in 36-43 whole sizes, and 37.5-42.5 half sizes. Each will sell for $225.

giro.com

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22 Comments
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Sean
Sean
2 years ago

Rad! This is the shoe from Giro I have been waiting for

Joenomad
Joenomad
2 years ago

Will they be offered in a wide fit version?

E Richter
2 years ago
Reply to  Joenomad

Not at this time. But worth a try-on unless you’re a true E or greater width. The upper design, and the material, create a little more volume than some of our more recent shoes. (*Eric, from Giro)

steve
steve
2 years ago
Reply to  E Richter

What is stopping Giro from wholesale addressing the historically non-anatomical fit of their shoes? Every. Single. Post. about Giro footwear has customer/reviewer complaints about how narrow they are. This recent rollout of models with more pliable upper materials is a talking point on how Giro seems to be on the right track, but it clearly doesn’t fundamentally address the issue. “Giro makes excellent looking shoes that don’t fit the humans they were designed for” seems to be the overarching theme for years now. Why release new models that only take half measures and send employees out to post comments instead of saying “we heard you, finally. we are now making human-shaped shoes. we still make our narrow shoes(now labeled as such) for customers who’s feet are too far gone to save, but we now recognize they are outliers.”

Are newly designed soles really THAT expensive? is that what it all comes down to?

Chris
Chris
2 years ago

As with many high end shoes, so near yet so far. Honestly am I the only one who wants his off road cycling shoes to be just a little resistant to water spraying on them?

I mean seriously, my feet don’t sweat that much but they sure get cold on wet winter rides. You know, maybe a Gore Tex liner or just less mesh?

Gillis
Gillis
2 years ago
Reply to  Chris

I’m right there with you. I live in the pnw, and days you would consider actually hot are rare. I’d much prefer a shoe with a little water/wind resistance.

E Richter
2 years ago
Reply to  Chris

These feature a DWR coating, and the Synchwire uppers do dry out quickly. But obviously they’re not intended to be “a winter shoe or a rain shoe”. If you’re looking for something that isn’t a fully-dedicated rain or winter shoe, the Empire and the Code are both built with one-piece microfiber uppers, and might be a better option for your general conditions.

C
C
2 years ago
Reply to  Chris

Really good point and funny how its always about crazy ventilation. Something more in between a dedicated winter shoe and this would be great that has much better wind and water resistance. Like my current shoe even if I put wool socks in them and two booties I can still feel the damn perfect summer ventilation pumping air 🙂

jcharles00
2 years ago
Reply to  Chris

I’m with you on not wanting so much ventilation. I’ve been wearing the PI X Prroject 1.0 shoes since ’14, and I think the thing that’s finally going to get me to switch is the excessive ventilation, which can be problematic in the cold, and also is the first thing on the shoe to bust out. I have dedicated “winter” boots, (bontrager OMW) but I find that they’re too much a lot of the time when the PIs are too little..

I’d love to see a shoe manufacturer address this. maybe the solution is just having some kind of purpose designed toe cover or something. (I have yet to find any that fit mtb shoes well)

luddite
luddite
2 years ago

Finally, big sizes!

Kayce
Kayce
2 years ago

That is way too much pay for the L4 dial. Macro release only should not be anywhere near a $200+ shoe

Speedneedle
Speedneedle
2 years ago

Dammit. Looks good, but for 2020 Giro abandoned size 41.5, so no luck for any more Giro shoes for me 🙁

Morgan
Morgan
2 years ago

When are companies making cycling shoes going to figure out that their women’s size range doesn’t match reality? The average US women’s shoe size has grown from 39 to 41 over the past 50 years, yet companies like Giro continue to offer a size range of -5/+2 from that average. At 5’10” I wear a size 45 shoe and I’m tired of being limited to “men’s” options. And don’t even get me started on bike frames that only go up to 54cm / M.

E Richter
2 years ago
Reply to  Morgan

Hi, Morgan – Thank you for your feedback. As a global brand, we’re looking at customers within and beyond the US, and we monitor sales data on a constant basis. To-date, the volume of sales in our size 43 (largest W’s size we currently offer) is quite small relative to other sizes, but we are open to expanding the range in the future if we see a need we can successfully meet.

E Richter
2 years ago

Hi, Steve – We take your feedback to heart. To share some insights with you… Fit is the most subjective aspect of any shoe (and really, anything we wear) and we take fit seriously, understanding that every single rider has unique feet and fit preferences, and that we won’t be the ideal choice for every rider around the world. With that in mind, we have made some adjustments to the fit of our shoes over time and our newer shoes do have a slightly roomier “fit” than many previous models. Ultimately, we ALWAYS recommend trying shoes on before buying. Part of that is because the fit of a shoe is dictated by many variables, from the fit last (the 3D shape that shoes are built on) to material thickness and pliability, to patterning, to closure type, to how the shoes are assembled and even how the upper is connected to the outsole/outsole shape. When feedback and sales data show a need, we offer options like our HV fit in certain models to meet the demand. As far as the cost involved – yes, it can be quite substantial to develop upper patterns, outsole tooling, etc. and the list of costs for any product goes well beyond just making the product. And finally, I promise that nobody “sent” me here. I’m here because I’m a rider like you, I care about what people think and I want to help provide useful info when I can to address good questions. Thanks for taking time to check this out, and be well!

SJC
SJC
2 years ago

Or you can just accept that Giro shoes don’t fit you and move on to a different brand. They work perfectly for my feet – and obviously for enough others that they continue to sell in sufficient quantities to keep the current fit alive.

Stevie M
Stevie M
2 years ago

They look really nice in Black, but, I’ve had a pair of Empire SLX and had to size up cos they were very slender, they were really good as well but my feet were stretching the upper to near break point. As SJC basically said you can’t please everyone and that’s a shame cos these look real nice.Maybe when a larger ‘last’ is used I can get back on the Giro wagon?

Burke Culligan
Burke Culligan
2 years ago

Agree with the narrow shoe issues with giro. Have always loved giro gear, but the regular shoes seem to be made for elves. I have a pair of Empire VR90 HV shoes, and even with those i don’t lace the first eyelets. (love them, but come on) Even when Giro does offer the HV, it’s always the most boring color pattern.

Some company someday will make a fortune when they design cycling gear for active, but working people with beer and burrito influenced dad bods. (avg) we love to ride a lot, but also love our burritos – make us some awesome shoes that fit!

mike w
mike w
2 years ago

Giro’s fit perfectly for me. Don’t change anything with the sizing. Only thing I was really asking for was double BOA enclosures instead of the tech-laces (Which I never really liked). Now you have addressed that in both your road and MTB shoes and I’m buying a new pair of both.

marciero
marciero
2 years ago

I ordered these as soon as I saw them. These things are the bomb. I love my Terraduras for bike packing and camping on the one hand, and have other lighter, stiffer, more efficient Lake MX 237 for regular use. I imagined these would fit right in the middle or replace the Terraduras with something less clunky. But in fact they are lighter than the Lakes, fit better, and are likely as efficient for someone with moderate power; that is, plenty stiff. Plus they are very comfortable walking. Regarding fit, I have somewhat wider feet. Lake’s sizing suggests wide, and my old Sidis were the mega version. It may just be that I like a narrower fit but the Sector fit perfectly-not too narrow at all. They are light and supremely comfortable. Why would you want LESS ventillation? I have winter and shoulder season shoes for cold and rainy weather. I suppose I can see wanting slightly more water resistant but I would not change the choice they made here.

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