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Go custom and aero with the Pearson Z1-Eleven alien beam tri bike

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Pearson_Z1-Eleven_alien-beam-triathlon-bike-1_mist-complete

With a tagline like ‘Alien in the Mist‘ we weren’t entirely sure what to expect of the latest creation from Pearson Bikes. Custom built in New Zealand by carbon frame builder Graeme Pearson, the Z1-Eleven is surely a radical approach to getting aero, and as such is not going to show up at any UCI races anytime soon. But if you are looking for a bike to tackle a triathlon, and want to eek out every aerodynamic advantage possible, then maybe there is something to be said for dropping the seattube and seatstays for a beam bike…

Pearson_Z1-Eleven_alien-beam-triathlon-bike-2_mist-aero-frameset

The Z1-Eleven is definitely eye-catching, with its dramatically shaped carbon frame. Omitting the seattube and seatstays is said to drastically reduce drag on the frame and allow the rear wheel to cut through the wind with less turbulence. To make up for taking out a good bit of the structural integrity of the diamond frame, Pearson makes up for it with a design with oversized vertically deep tube shapes. That said, besides dropping tubes, the bike also remains incredibly thin side to side. While the downtube flares to meet the widely set bottom bracket bearings and the chainstays flow straight back to the rear wheel, the toptube goes the other way, transitioning from the 1 1/8″ (28.6mm) top of the headset to the adjustable seat post, which is just 8mm wide!

Pearson_Z1-Eleven_alien-beam-triathlon-bike-3_standard-frameset Pearson_Z1-Eleven_alien-beam-triathlon-bike-4_integrated-bar-nosecone

The Z1-Eleven is fully custom, so there is a lot of room for individuality, and as such can be made in both very large sizes like the XL at left, or down for smaller riders too. The bike comes out of two basic iterations, though: the standard aero frame set at left, and the radically aero version with integrated nosecone, hydration setup, and stem+handlebar. The integrated solution is all about tying the bike together, with the fork, bar, and nosecone smoothly transitioning into the shaped frame.

Pearson_Z1-Eleven_alien-beam-triathlon-bike-5_downtube

In either case Pearson builds the typical Z1-Eleven with a seattube stub that lets the bike run a traditional double chainring setup, either mechanical or electronic. But of course Di2 single ring setups are also possible (see the complete bike below) and now that SRAM 1x road drivetrains are a thing, especially for races against the clock, you can also have them build you a bike without the accommodation for a front derailleur for an even more slippery aero setup.

Pearson_Z1-Eleven_alien-beam-triathlon-bike-6_complete

Pearson crafts the Z1-Eleven one at a time for clients worldwide, having been building beam bikes for over 25 years. That gives them freedom to customize the bikes to suit the needs of riders of any size, fit, or racing style, whether it is a frameset-only or down to dialing in a specific aerobar fit and shape. Pearson also does other custom carbon designs, as well as fabrication for other industries. They are even set up to do carbon frame and component repairs too.

PearsonBikes.com

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boom
boom
8 years ago

I’ve said this before, but an aero/Tri/TT bike that gets launched without actual aero data and just relies on ‘looking fast’ is a bit pointless. Besides being different for the sake of being different, what niche does this possibly fill over a Speed Concept or P5?

JBikes
JBikes
8 years ago
Reply to  boom

I agree, although almost all past aero studies have down the ST to be a drag member compared to the “Y” frame designs. That said, how much this contributes is hard to say and the overall efficiency may or may not be greater depending on other factors.

anonymous
anonymous
8 years ago
Reply to  JBikes

Pretty sure Z-frames are faster despite having a seat tube

JBikes
JBikes
8 years ago
Reply to  anonymous

I think you are right. Got confused between the two, z-frame protects the leading edge of the rear tire while eliminating the down tube. but again, who knows without testing.

Deja Voodoo
Deja Voodoo
8 years ago

Well it only took 20 years for someone to bring back a bike the was already produced in the ’90’s…

Craig
8 years ago

Just a carbon version of the Softride .

kevinfromVA
kevinfromVA
8 years ago

There’s no cables run in half the pics. Their propriety bars don’t even show anything mounted.

Patrick Michael
Patrick Michael
8 years ago

Looks like Vin Diesel should fight with it…

nightfend
8 years ago

No brake or shifter levers. That’s practical.

fib
fib
8 years ago

The seatpost has been photoshoped out of the forst picture… And Pearson, I would try to find a better set for pictures, maybe with some sun?

Mick
Mick
8 years ago
Reply to  fib

D’uh… no it hasn’t

KL
KL
8 years ago

Two different forks?

GlobalTriGuy
GlobalTriGuy
8 years ago

Ridden them years ago and they are fast. Don’t need the overrated scientific data. Never been able to go as quick on standard TT bikes. Although waiting for Battistella’s production one from Taiwan for better quality.

alvis
alvis
8 years ago

Little bird tells me the new Cervelo is a beam bike………………….

Fraser C
Fraser C
8 years ago

Hmmm, aero concerns have been covered, but as an ex Softride user I must mention torsional hysteresis. Unless you pedal perfect circles, with equal power on the back/upstroke, you will lose ALL of the work stored in frame twist each pedal stroke. Even with a carbon frame (my Softride was carbon) you can see the rear wheel flexing in rotation each stroke, that work does nothing for forward propulsion..

John
John
8 years ago

Pearson’s a legend in frame building, how many can say your hand made carbon bikes went to the Olympics, manufacturing and perfecting this design for 25 years. Nothing to bring back from the 90’s

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