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Heritage Division brings handmade Italian city riding classics to the USA

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New San Fransisco based Heritage Division has developed a new line of premium, classic urban bikes with one of Italy’s longest running bike builders. The limited release four bike line is handcrafted outside of Milan by Taurus, a family owned company who has been building bikes since 1908. By working directly with these craftsman, Heritage is able to bring these timeless, traditional bikes to the states, with some key modern updates. Roll past the fold for a closer look at the Corsa, Lusso, Strada, and Viaggio…

The Heritage partnership sees the debut of Taurus’ bikes in the US. For over a century Taurus has built a reputation in Italy for building original, stylish utility bikes, while preserving classic bicycle construction techniques. Now together with Heritage Division, their bikes are getting some modern accents. Taurus remains one of the few bike companies in the world striving to manufacture all parts of the bike in-house. Starting with frame building, through to paint and assembly, much of the work is done in their Vanzaghello, Italy factory. In the end, a few components only get outsourced to locally producers.

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While a handmade, artisanal production is key yo the new brand, so is integrating technology into the process. Heritage has even developed an app for iOS that lets buyers follow their new bike as it goes through production until they pick it up for the first ride. Added to that, each classic bike includes a GPS locater inside the frame that can be used to track the bike if it were to be stolen. The app includes a host of other functions, from mapping, to weather management, and even a calendar function that will help plan your ride to get to appointments on time.

Heritage-Division_Corsa_classic-Italian-road-city-bike_complete

The first bike in the Heritage Division lineup is the classic road Corsa. Like all of the other bikes, it is hand-built in Italy with a classic lugged construction, and a threaded headset/fork/stem. Built for tradition as well as style, all of the bikes include classic polished aluminum components, unique handlebars according to contemporary standards, and leather details like Brooks saddles and leather bar tape.

Heritage-Division_Corsa_classic-Italian-road-city-bike_bar Heritage-Division_Corsa_classic-Italian-road-city-bike_number-plate

The bikes all get spec’d with white tires for an old world feel, as they color with use to look like natural rubber. The $1350 Lusso 7-speed Sunrace drivetrain, MKS pedals with toe clips and leather straps, and a B17 saddle.

Heritage-Division_Lusso_classic-Italian-cruiser-city-bike_complete

The Lusso is more of an upright cruiser and starts to add in some everyday features, like moderate-coverage, color-matched fenders and integrated battery-powered LED lights. With a 3-speed internal drivetrain, it also includes a color-matched chain guard to keep you cuff clean.

Heritage-Division_Lusso_classic-Italian-cruiser-city-bike_rod-brake Heritage-Division_Lusso_classic-Italian-cruiser-city-bike_grips Heritage-Division_Lusso_classic-Italian-cruiser-city-bike_front-end

Like the Corsa, the $1500 Lusso gets a Brooks Flyer saddle, but opts instead for shaped wooden grips. Braking-wise the Lusso gets a unique and very traditional setup, with rod-actuated braking front and rear.

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The Strada is the classic take on the flat(ish) bar city bike, and gets the same 3-speed hub as the Lusso. The $1450 bike has a unique 3-piece welded stainless Condorino-style handle bar that end up with a nice little bit of backsweep.

Heritage-Division_Strada_classic-Italian-flat-bar-city-bike_light Heritage-Division_Strada_classic-Italian-flat-bar-city-bike_bar

It gets a Brooks Professional, flat MKS pedals, and a minimal set of color-matched fenders with small LED lights powered by the front dynamo hub.

Heritage-Division_Viaggio_classic-Italian-utility-city-bike_complete

Lastly the Viaggio is the traditional city utility bike. It features a set of solid front and rear racks that include matching leather straps to secure your load.

Heritage-Division_Viaggio_classic-Italian-utility-city-bike_front-rack Heritage-Division_Viaggio_classic-Italian-utility-city-bike_rear-rack

The $1500 bike has a 5-speed Sturmey Archer internally geared rear hub, paired with a dynamo up front to power the integrated LED lighting. It also gets a Brooks Flyer saddle and matching leather bar tape on its Torino-style swept handlebar.

Each of the bikes is painted by Taurus and available in four matte colors. Fit-wise they then come in three standard sizes – 54, 56 & 60cm with the idea to fit a range of riders, leaning a bit on taller cyclists it seems.

Update: Heritage has sent us some updated, and slightly reduced MSRPs. The figures above are still listed on their website, but they claim new pricing of Corsa – $1250, Lusso  – $1400, Strada $1350, and Viaggio – $1450.  

HeritageDivision.com

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mudrock
mudrock
8 years ago

Rod brakes? Are you kidding me? They have no leverage whatsoever. They’re terrible. On a $1500 bike?

anonymous
anonymous
8 years ago

I always wanted a hand-made rod brake bikes that cost 10 times as much as a Flying Pigeon or an Original Raleigh Roadster

Also, interrupter levers used as reverse bar end levers with exposed cables on a flipped riser bar. Brilliant, someone deserves a raise.

Craig
Craig
8 years ago

The Viaggio utility bike could do with some practical length fenders. I love bikes like this but only when designed properly. These bikes are somewhat disappointing in that regard. I won’t be a customer.

Zac
Zac
8 years ago

I could use that weather management function…give me sunshine!

Tomi
Tomi
8 years ago

I don’t understand those fenders.

Scrambler
Scrambler
8 years ago

I bet that Heritage Bicycle of Chicago is excited about these.

Jarrcon
Jarrcon
8 years ago
Reply to  Scrambler

@scrambler Was thinking the same thing. Looks like someone didn’t do a copyright search.

William
William
8 years ago

I work in a shop that sells Tarus city bikes and the quality control is horrible. Alignment is sometimes out as much as a centimeter in either direction, the finish is mediocre, chain lengths on the same model are randomly too long or too short, and chainstay and seatstay clearance are not consistent between 2 bikes of the same model in the same size. The seat lugs collapse around the binder bolt when clients tighten it enough to stop the post from slipping. The stupid classic look lights all fail fairly quickly when the two rivets that hold the light to the bracket (and provide the earth) become loose. The dropouts are made of the softest steel I have ever seen. One time a complete bike was sent to us with an extended steer tube; someone had actually chopped a steerer above the crown race, tapped in a plug, welded on a longer steer tube and ground down the weld bead so the crown race would pass (It was for a 64cm frame size.. I can only guess that they had no stock of longer than normal steer tubes at the time) I have been pushing management to abandon the brand for better made bikes, but they (and our customers) here love the idea of made in Europe.

Cryogenii
Cryogenii
8 years ago
Reply to  William

If you want a European bike, best stick to the brands Europeans actually ride! Pashley do some retro town bikes and are sort of England’s Schwinn.

Cryogenii
Cryogenii
8 years ago

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