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Hunt Bikes’ adventure craving steel 29+ Bikepacking/Singletrack frameset

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Just a couple of years old now, Hunt Bikes is a tiny company in Australia founded by avid off-road adventure cyclist Dan Hunt. Their concept is pretty simple – design and produce high value bikes & accessories to outfit cyclists on trail riding & bikepacking adventures – with a bit of an eco-friendly tinge. So far their catalog is also simple. The make a single modern 29+ rigid steel mountain bike with a good balance of attachment points and a set of bags to strap on that bike. But simple can be good…

29+ Bikepacking/Singletrack frameset

The one double butted 4130 chromoly bike that Hunt has developed so far is as straight forward as you can get for proper off-road bikepacking. Starting with what Hunt calls classic 29er geometry, they stretched out space behind the bottom bracket thanks to a machined chainstay yoke and the choice to go 1x only, and can fit in up to a 29 x 3″ tire (developed around a Surly Knard on a Stan’s Hugo rim.)

Tech details

With that the bike sticks with standard space thru-axles at each end (12 x 142mm & 15 x 100mm), but gets a matching tapered double butted 4130 fork, and a PF30 BB. It gets full length, fully external routing, a 44mm headtube, and a 31.6mm seatpost

As for gear hauling points on the bike Hunt chose not to include proper rack mounts, with the thought that riders would opt for lighter bikepacking bag setups. There are plenty of mounting points, though. On both the top and bottom of the downtube the frame gets 3-bolt anything cage mounts, plus a third pair of bottle bosses on the seattube. Each fork leg also gets a 3-bolt cage mount too, so you can haul as much water as you can imagine.

Altogether the butted frame & fork are said to keep a light feel for long days off-road, yet can stand up to the abuse of days out on tour. And to top it off, Hunt says that their bikes are carbon neutral. The company buys carbon credits for each frameset sold to offset the environmental footprint of their production.

The frameset is available in a three size S-L (15-19″) range and in gloss black for $1261 AUD ($990 USD, plus taxes & fees that are up to the buyer) or brushed chrome for $1337 AUD ($1050 USD, plus taxes & fees).

The EU importer lists both versions for the same 980€ which includes VAT & delivery, sweetening the deal in Europe.

As to the bags that you see in the photos (and that we alluded to as a product), Hunt only makes them to order. They aren’t officially ‘available’ right now, but maybe you can talk them into making you a set when you are ordering a frameset?

Hunt 1000 Australian off-road bikepacking tour

If all that sounds good and you have some time to ride down under, Hunt Bikes is running their 2nd annual Hunt 1000 off-road tour in just a few weeks. Join them to ride the 1000km from Canberra to Melbourne for a week of self-supported riding in the high Australian backcountry. More details over at their website.

HuntBikes.com or HuntBikes.eu

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23 Comments
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John
John
5 years ago

“Each fork leg also gets a 3-bolt cage mount too, so you can haul as much water as you can imagine.”

Well, I am pretty sure I can imagine hauling even more water with a rear rack. Adding some mounts for mudguards and a rear rack would really make the frame more versatile, which I think is pretty handy for a “crazy adventure” style bicycle.

Ariel
Ariel
5 years ago

Hunt have invented an “adventure” bike without mug guard mount, without mounts for racks (front or, even, rear), hence, no light mounts… so, basically, Hunt’s “adventure” bike excludes anyone who wants to go on an adventure longer than a day or 2, or that excludes camping, etc.
That’s a weird vision for “adventure”… Too bad because the bike looks otherwise pretty nice

Peter Goodman
Peter Goodman
5 years ago
Reply to  Ariel

It’s a Bikepacking bike! no need for rack mounts etc.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
5 years ago
Reply to  Peter Goodman

Really weird after all these years people still don’t realize racks totally suck off road. The whole frickin’ reason this genre exists! You won’t make it 2 days into Tour Divide without snapping your racks right off….. oy vey [head slapping forehead]

John
John
5 years ago

Assuming your statement is true, that it is impossible to engineer a rack that can be used on the Tour Divide, there are more adventures than that one route. A quality frame can easily last decades, having some extra mounting points allows you to customize the bicycle for each adventure.

As for the origins for bikepacking, the design of the bags are very much a workaround for fact that many MTB’s didn’t have enough mounting points. With better attachment points one could up with even better designs for bags that are lighter and stay in place better.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
5 years ago
Reply to  John

Did I say racks for off-road touring are “impossible to engineer”? Mmm, nope. But nobody is chomping at the bit to make better rack systems for off road touring, nobody.

There’s a pretty good 2-3 day bikepacking loop from my house that involves quite a bit of technical singletrack. Show up panniers hanging off your front and and you’ll rip them off on the first few turns. If you make the full loop without breaking a rack stay or snapping a mounting bolt clean off I would be genuinely surprised.

Rhythm+Blues
Rhythm+Blues
5 years ago

Did you know that when John Stamstad was the first to TT the GDMTBR route from border to border, in 18 days, he used racks?
Don’t overload them and they’d last fine on the Divide or most other places. Around the world, even.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
5 years ago
Reply to  Rhythm+Blues

Sure, people used to ride toe clips off road too. Is it still possible to do that, sure. Would it be the ideal solution in this day and age, absolutely not.

Ariel
Ariel
5 years ago

@ Kernel Flickitov
as far as I understand, bikepacking bags were only design as a workaround to be able to install panniers onto lightweight road bikes and mountain bikes. It’s a workaround !
So designing an “adventure” bike without mounts for racks and mudguards will only attract hipsters who actually think that panniers are uncool.
I’m sure that Hunt will be successful with this bike. Jones have already been successful with very similar steel Chinese-made bikes.
I love bikes, and love to see bikes being ridden for many, many years. Sadly, those bikes are more likely to be ridden twice by hipsters before the fashion move on to something else!

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
5 years ago
Reply to  Ariel

Nobody doing any serious off road touring is using panniers, and it has nothing to do with hipsters. Attack what you don’t understand is the general prose here, I totally get that.

Not making it rain
Not making it rain
5 years ago

Price it at $500 bucks and I’ll buy one today. $1k seems a bit much? I know Niner charges $1200 for their 853 SIR9 so maybe it’s not that crazy? Am I just a cheapass?

contrarian
contrarian
5 years ago

The SIR9 is pretty light, as is the Vassago Verheun. If Hunt kept the frame weight competitive (under 5lbs) then it’d be worth that $900 easy. As usual though, for all the specs that Hunt is willing to provide, weight is not one of them.

contrarian
contrarian
5 years ago
Reply to  contrarian

Stolen from their facebook: weight of the 19″ frame with forks is 2730g (6lbs) + 1430g (3.15lbs). Older versions of the Verhuen and SIR9 were under 5lbs, not sure about the modern iterations of those frames.

Rhythm+Blues
Rhythm+Blues
5 years ago
Reply to  contrarian

The SIR9 is also a pretty whippy/flexy frame and it’s not 29+. Loaded bikes that can haul fast need some stiffness – there’s more to a frame than weight. Choice ..

graveller
graveller
5 years ago

rear: un-tukt :-/

Jerry
Jerry
5 years ago

No XL size and no boost spacing makes this a non-starter. Might as well just pick up a first-generation Krampus…

OldDoc
OldDoc
5 years ago

“Rider likes and rides bikes enough to make his own version of something fun.
But public bashes his efforts from a comfy chair.”

gringo
gringo
5 years ago
Reply to  OldDoc

exactly. can you imagine putting up your hard earned cash and valuable free time to make something like this a reality, and then your target demographic just sh*ts all over your project?

People can be a**holes, and this supposed ‘small, close knit’ community of bike geeks is sadly no different.

nice looking bikes Mr. Hunt.

Rhythm+Blues
Rhythm+Blues
5 years ago
Reply to  OldDoc

Too true. I like the clean look and I like choice. Boost would be nice but every bike has a Gen 2 at some point.

Rollo
Rollo
5 years ago

love it!

ascarlarkinyar
5 years ago

Yay another steel, ugly welded, limited bike just like…….all the rest of them. Is there like a billion of these little companies all making the same bike? Also a venture bike? Jump on the bandwagon. No fender mounts? What’s next from them, a gravel grinder? How about a Enduro gravel grinder….

Ariel
Ariel
5 years ago
Reply to  ascarlarkinyar

@ ascarlarkinyar
A typical steel frame cost less than USD 70 Ex-works to be manufactured in China (like this Hunt) even when buying small annual volumes of approx 1,000 units/year.
Sell it direct-to-consumer for USD 1,000 to hipsters who think it’s cool to ride steel frames. Hipsters actually think it’s better to not have mudguard and rack mounts (read the reaction to my comment above)
Do the math with with the above 2 numbers… That’s why everyone is at it, copying Jones’ Chinese-made bikes !

Mike A
Mike A
5 years ago

It kinda looks like they committed to the idea for the bike just before the whole 27.5/650b thing took off.
29er wheels and a PF30 BB? I thought we just quit all that stuff.

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