park tool fat bike wheel truing stand

Park Tool’s catalog continues to grow, covering all the bases as bike standards evolve and the tools needed to service them change. The new TS-4 truing stand is a perfect example, now capable of holding a wheel with a 5″ tire installed, with or without the brake rotor mounted. It’s QR and thru axle compatible out of the box and maintains the usual marks of quality – made in USA chromed and powder coated steel construction, sync’d adjustments to keep the wheel centered, etc. It holds axle widths from 75mm up to 215mm and is compatible with their rotor gauge and dial indicator.

park tool fat bike wheel truing stand

Shown adjacent to the truing stand are updated grease guns, which let you either thread a tube directly into it or fill a canister. Also fits the Park Tool anti-seize compound and assembly compound tubes.

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The new PRS-22 Team Issue Workstand uses a tripod base that slides up into an easily packable form. The “tray” slides fore/aft to keep the bike’s weight balanced on the stand, and the BB rest’s width can be adjusted to fit various BB standards.

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The axle mount works for front or rear without external adapters, just slide the parts needed into place and it’ll lock your fork or frame in place. Retail is just under $300 (buy it here). A transport bag is sold separately.

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For locking smaller things into place, they’re now making their own Press Fit Retaining Compound and Thread Locker compounds, as well as an adhesive primer. They say they’re half or less as expensive as the category go-to, and are a little more user friendly. The primer is required, otherwise you could end up permanently bonding your good together.

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The BBT-16 self extracting crank cap tool is self explanatory, and so brilliant.

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Even more brilliant are the new HXS-3 stubby hex wrenches. Ever had to wrangle a full size allen wrench into a tight spot (like low mount rear brake calipers)? Then you know just how much these are needed.

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The new CM-25 Professional Chain Scrubber gets an upgraded, shop quality die-cast aluminum housing, stainless steel hinges and a locking slide to hold up to repeated use. The brush and sponge internals are sold as a replacement part, too, so you can keep it humming like new long after the original cleaning bits are ruined.

Other new bits not shown include Campagnolo crank and bearing pullers, a dial indicator for checking brake rotor true-ness, cassette lock ring tool, upgraded internal cable/wire guide tool with new Di2 e-Tube fitting, mini pumps and a saw guide for the WTB PadLoc handlebar series so you can cut your existing bars at exactly the right angle.

ParkTool.com

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14 comments

    • AngryBikeWrench on

      Are you trolling? They’re messy as hell, but if you don’t want to or can’t remove the chain from the bike, the Park and Pedros work great in my experience. Slap one on, pedal pedal pedal, blow out the excess degreaser with the air hose, re-lube, and you have a chain that’s as close to as happy as the day it was born as possible.

      Reply
    • Peter J Sirman on

      I’ve had a few and not one ever worked as advertised. Pedro’s is better than most but that isn’t saying much.

      Reply
    • Mike Williams on

      I used to think that but I recently got a deal on a Park Tools (the plastic one) and it works great if you use a 3 pass system: 1) heavy duty cleaner; 2) soapy water (what I am going to wash the bike with); 3) water.

      Reply
  1. Dave on

    “he grease guns are Dualco’s. They work great except for the the thumb plate which can uncrimp.”

    Exactly. That is their biggest weakness. I wish the manufacturer would come up with a stronger attachment method.

    Reply
    • sceloglaux on

      I like to center punch and drill the post that the domed part is pressed on to and drill and put a screw and washer through it. I have one that’s held up for years this way after having come off. They have a good warranty though, very responsive if you mind sending it away.

      Reply

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