Home > Bike Types > Road Bike

Priceless Ti & Carbon Aston Martin .1R Road Bike by J.Laverack Custom Integrates Brakes

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated 4-piston disc brakes
56 Comments
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

Titanium bike builder J.Laverack has paired up with Aston Martin to develop what looks to be the world’s most custom road bike. And possibly the most expensive real performance bike we’ve ever seen. Even if maybe not quite priceless. Mixing 3D-printed titanium joints, carbon fiber tubing, a new level of integrated details, and more custom finishing options than you can shake a stick at, this J.Laverack Aston Martin .1R takes bespoke further than we’ve ever seen.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, angled

I mean, come on – just look at those 4-piston brake calipers tucked into the frame and fork. This bike is sick!

J.Laverack Aston Martin .1R custom road bike


Hand crafted in the UK, this undeniably a jewel of a luxury road bike debuts this week at Rouleur Live in London after 4 years in development.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, online customized colors

But Aston Martin and J.Laverack sought not only to create a ultra-premium super bike. (And it looks like they did that.) But to build a user-configurable ecosystem that gives buyers another level of customization, down to visualizing each and every color and finish choice in an interactive way.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, No. 3
(Photos/J-Laverack)

At its core, the J.Laverack Aston Martin .1R is a parametrically designed custom road bike. Buyers establish their individual requirements through a custom bike fit at Aston Martin HQ in Gaydon, Warwickshire in the UK. Next, J.Laverack 3D-prints a unique set of 6Al/4V titanium lugs then bonded to sculpted carbon tubes. Then, Aston Martin & J.Laverack finish off the bike and its integrated components in a mix of Cerakote, wet paint, and exposed carbon weave to suit the buyer’s tastes.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, matchy-macty with your supercar

In fact, bike buyer pick from the exact same color palettes and trim choices offered on Aston Martin’s cars, delivering “the opportunity to pair car and bike, should they wish to.

That whole custom process is completely individualized to each buyer.

And we expect it to come with a pricetag worthy of an Aston Martin motorcar.

What’s so unique?

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, 3D-printed ti lugs

Oddly, 3D-printed ti lugs bonded to carbon tubes are surprisingly more and more common these days. Just like fully integrated internal cable routing. This frame is certainly sleek looking. But this J.Laverack Aston Martin .1R road bike takes it to the next level in the details.

Custom integrated 4-piston road brakes

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, disc brakes

The custom brakes were one of the first to capture our attention. Neatly integrated into the 3D-printed ti dropouts, the .1R features custom 4-piston brake calipers. Aston Martin machines the brake bodies from a single block of aluminum, and the pistons from titanium, created for unparalleled stopping power and smooth pad retraction. Interestingly, Laverack appears to be able to pair them from standard brake levers from Shimano, SRAM, or Campagnolo.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, Aston Matrin made brake calipers

The custom brakes also get their own matching custom Aston Martin Valkyrie wheel-inspired 160mm brake rotors. They sport a titanium carrier and semi-floating stainless steel braking surface.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated disc brakes

Sorry, I can’t help drooling over those custom brakes.

Custom integrated carbon & titanium cockpit

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated cokcpit

On top of that, the .1R features a sleek 3D-printed titanium Sphyr titanium stem with a hollow cutout, and noticeably… no clamping bolts. A vaguely defined “patent-pending triumph of engineering ingenuity” results in no visible bolts securing the stem to the steerer tube or allowing for the tightening of the headset.

The cockpit exhibits a seamless transition from the ti hammerhead stem to the exposed carbon of the handlebar tops. Presumably it’s all bonded together like the frame. What we do know… the bars are also custom sized to fit each rider.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated leather bar wrap

Finishing off the cockpit is a hand-stitched bar wrap job in lieu of conventional bar tape. Pick from natural leather or suede-like synthetic Alcantara, if you prefer – of course color matched to your saddle and the complete bike’s detailing.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom leather Brooks C13 saddle

At the other end of the rider contact points is an integrated carbon seatmast, topped off by a titanium seatpost head and a Brooks C13 Cambium saddle, material matched to your bar finish.

Custom carbon & ti cranks, too

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated ti cranks

Why stop now, right?

The .1R features a custom crankset, as well. J.Laverack constructs the custom length cranks from molded carbon fiber with an integrated proprietary direct mount interface.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, crankset

Then, at their tips, more 3D-printed titanium provides the pedal thread interface and protects the ends of the arms. All that comes together with a two chainring setup machined out of a single block of billet aluminum like a Cannondale SI crankset, but in a gearing combo of your choice.

J.Laverack Aston Martin .1R – Priceless pricing, options & availability

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, frameset

Officially, Aston Martin offers the .1R road bike for sale through bike builder J.Laverack, who operates the online customizer tool. But the process clearly leans towards the more ultra-exclusive feel of Aston Martin.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, no. 3 angled

As for actual pricing… We were told the end consumer price is available only “on application”. We take that to mean, ‘if you have to ask, you can’t afford it.’

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury travel case included

But maybe reassuring for you investment, each numbered bike comes with a matching numbered carbon & alloy luxury travel case, plus a customized crankbrothers track pump and handmade wooden tool case.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, angled rear

You do get to pick from any modern wireless disc brake road bike groupset. Shimano Dura-Ace Di2, Campagnolo Super Record Wireless, or SRAM Red eTap AXS. Rolling stock are a 55mm deep tubeless Aera Components wheelset on customized alloy hubs, Sapim CX-Ray spokes and finished with 30mm Continental GP5000S TR tires in stealth black.

J-Laverack Aston Martin .1R bespoke carbon & titanium road bike, made in the UK, luxury custom and fully integrated, online customizer

So who wants to venture to say what all this will cost you? Feel free to experiment with the online customizer tool, then…

Give us your guess in the comments below.

AstonMartin.JLaverack.co.uk

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

56 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Jason DW
Jason DW
5 months ago

Whoa, that is how you do it right! The integrated brakes are game changer in aesthetics. They look absolutely fantastic

pete
pete
5 months ago
Reply to  Jason DW

Seize or wear out a piston in those calipers and this pretty thing becomes landfill fodder.

BR seems to like these odes to excess.

Billyshoo
Billyshoo
5 months ago
Reply to  pete

Yes, I’m sure a decent number of us appreciate seeing what others’ imaginations are able to conjure up and what a precious few can bring to fruition. In large part, that’s why I’M here, at least. 🙂

Chris
Chris
5 months ago
Reply to  pete

Looks like the calipers can be swapped out. Assume they’re custom and expensive, but the actual caliper isn’t bonded to the rest of the frame.

Fig Ciocc
Fig Ciocc
5 months ago
Reply to  pete

Who is regularly wearing out or seizing pistons. I’ve got a disc brake groupset with 60+k miles on it I’m 185 lbs and live in a mountainous area with temps exceeding 110° and have never had seized or worn out pistons. I have motorcycles with 100k on them used as track bikes with original calipers that are on the original piston just brake bleed every year and at 70,000 I changed the o rings and seals. Think you’re just making stuff up to complain.

JNH
JNH
5 months ago
Reply to  pete

If you can afford this you can afford to have Oly build you a new brake caliper when needed. The Caliper still bolts in so it’s not like you need to cut the frame up to service it.

Jason DW
Jason DW
5 months ago
Reply to  pete

Im interested in that they look so classy and designs will move over to like townie bikes, cruisers or whatever else could benefit from such elegance

mud
mud
5 months ago

Yes, brake cables are so inconvenient. Too bad this isn’t a functional bike as pictured.

Justin Pare
Justin Pare
5 months ago

I guess if you can afford this who care how impractical integrated/hidden cables are….I am pretty sure none of these will see any real-world miles.

Exodux
5 months ago

I’ll take 2, but I wonder if the bikes packed into the custom carrying cases would fit into the cargo bay of my custom Gulfstream jet..

Really though, I love seeing bikes like this even it they are mostly unattainable.

Jamie
Jamie
5 months ago

I have nothing negative to say whatsoever. I’d love to have a spare 50k lying about.

Billyshoo
Billyshoo
5 months ago
Reply to  Jamie

I’m guessing that 50K would be about a 40% down payment.

will
will
5 months ago

i was gonna buy it but unfortunately the drivetrain is not custom.maybe the next one!

Al Giorno
Al Giorno
5 months ago

The front derailleur is not adjusted. But who cares 🙂

blahblahblah
blahblahblah
5 months ago

it would be impossible to wipe the smile of my face riding that badboy

I'm very interested
I'm very interested
5 months ago

I’ve sent them an email asking how much with a 105 mechanical groupset, without the travel case (as I’ve got a bike bag with a foam divider that would be fine), and with no paint because my neighbour Muzza has a spray booth in his garage and does cashies on the weekends.

Brent
Brent
5 months ago

few years ago I was convinced that disc brakes would already look like this in many bikes, with complete integration and no exposed hoses.

Mike
5 months ago

I hate cycling-automotive collaborations, cause they almost always brought us utter crap.

This is different though – don’t know about the ride quality, but it looks gorgeous and that’s all I need here. 🙂

PaulM
PaulM
5 months ago

The rear brake calliper would look so much better if it was integrated into the seatstay too, rather than using the additional strut.
C’mon, if you’re paying that much, surely perfection is achievable?!

JackL
JackL
5 months ago
Reply to  PaulM

Then you would take away a lot of compliance in the seatstay.

Roger Pedacter
Roger Pedacter
5 months ago
Reply to  PaulM

Guessing they did that to match the front. But both brakes are where the design falls short. They just don’t match the rest of the lines on the bike or look particularly well sorted. Shame. Seapost doesn’t really match either but it seems less egregious for some reason.

Weird. The more I look at it, the less the design details match and it starts to look like random parts thrown together. Guess it’s a Laverack at the core, so what can you really expect?

Dominic
Dominic
5 months ago
Reply to  PaulM

It’s definitely on purpose, It maximizes seatstay length, and also makes the seatstays symmetrical across the bike. Both should help with the ride.

PaulM
PaulM
5 months ago
Reply to  Dominic

But the dropouts are 3D-printed – the “calliper” could easily be extended around to the base of the seat-stay to remove the need for the strut, and the drive-side version could also enable the seatstays to stay symmetrical.

Oliver
Oliver
5 months ago

You would hope for trickle down from this. But there will be none. Had it confirmed that even the disc rotors (which you’d have hoped would be produced in volume for the general market) will only ever be available to buyers of the whole package.

Serious well qualified engineers spend thousands of hours designing a bike (almost never happens outside track bikes designed to take Olympic gold), and almost none of the components or bikes sold will ever be used – they’ll just hang on walls.

Shafty
Shafty
5 months ago
Reply to  Oliver

They probably don’t have the machine time or labor hours available to produce them at scale, nor the incentive. There’s also very little real-world benefit to this level of integration, and I’d argue, many downsides.

If you want a custom bike with some integration, approach Sturdy, Prova, or Huhn. Heck, throw Firefly in there too. They all make a great product that people are able to buy and work on.

Tom
Tom
5 months ago

Nice that this thing exists as an option for people who can actually navigate the 100% custom graphics to arrive at something truly interesting and cool (and afford it). I know I could never manage it myself. The brakes, interesting as they are, seem like they could have been more organic looking, the extra strut in particular looks like an add-on. It would have been cooler looking if they had used a 140mm disc on the rear, somehow I doubt the user is going to be overheating the system coming down a big and steep mountain.

Alan
Alan
5 months ago

Fun build, and beautiful. Love the look of the brakes and stem/combo. But…then we get a clamp on front derailleur and derail the flow of the aesthetics.

Doc Sarvis
Doc Sarvis
5 months ago

With Lance Stroll on board you get 20th at every race, punch your mechanic, and thank Dad for the ride.

Joe Bond
Joe Bond
5 months ago

No Lucas Electric components?

Fig Ciocc
Fig Ciocc
5 months ago

Gorgeous

Anonymous
Anonymous
5 months ago

All this work to integrate stuff and they use a band-on FD. I know it’s for 1x but still, if you’re paying that kind of money, you deserve a braze-on fitting option.

ShopMechanic
ShopMechanic
5 months ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Not getting the band clamp hate. It’s just a superior mounting system to FD braze ons. They are WAY stiffer, have more adjustability and are easier to adjust. I agree that they don’t look great, but that can’t be hard to fix with an unlimited budget and access to titanium 3D printers.

Going out on a limb here and saying that FD braze ons are the biggest fashion over function aspect of modern road bikes. And yes, I have considered internally headset routed hydraulic brakes when making that statement.

Gerald
Gerald
5 months ago

Seven years ago, this very website published an article on the Argon18 EB16 fighter jet inspired design that makes this bike look dated.
https://bikerumor.com/eb16-argon18-develops-jet-fighter-tech-keep-drag-check/

NEIL SIMPSON
NEIL SIMPSON
5 months ago
Reply to  Gerald

that was a cool bike, but a different brief and I think it was only a concept?

Oliver
Oliver
5 months ago
Reply to  NEIL SIMPSON

So far so is this. Those pictures are all renders.

everythingisawesome
everythingisawesome
5 months ago
Reply to  Oliver

I don’t think you can take renders to a show..

OriginalMV
OriginalMV
5 months ago

WOW! Truly defining the future of cycling. Those brakes are amazing! So…..how do you align the calipers? As everyone already knows, Campagnolo, Shimano, and SRAM all have the same volume per stroke in their levers’ master cylinder, but do Aston Martin seals work with both DOT and mineral oil?

Well, one look at the seatpost has laid my concerns to rest. I mean, I’ve never ever had an issue with a 1-bolt side load saddle clamp…or at least not from a prestige brand that is most definitely committed to a PR stunt for the long run. Well, I am no more likely to work on this bike myself than I am to ride it.

Like every cycling enthusiast, I already own 3 Aston-Martins. I don’t know how much any of them cost because I’m so rich I have no concept of money. My Aston-Martin dealer just has my card on file and tells me if I have anything that my manservant needs to retrieve for the mansion I haven’t bothered to locate yet.

Huffagnolo SuperMagna
Huffagnolo SuperMagna
5 months ago

Yes the bike is probably expensive but who cares. Don’t buy one, it looks cool. Can’t we enjoy something silly and stupid once and while. Maybe one day this sort of stuff will make it down to the more affordable stuff or might make some improvements on things. It looks cool none the less. I cannot afford a Picasso and sure it is ridiculously expensive for a painting but it is still nice to look at it.

mark
5 months ago

Wow its so integrated and if I don’t like the brakes I can sell the bike to someone else. If you compare the aesthetics of todays flat mount brakes I think you will find they are pretty good. Looking at this exercise in design reminds me why I love designers but fortunately I do not have to live with them.

kevin
kevin
5 months ago

Works of art, I would display it and likely never ride it.

Of course, I will never have that kind of “fun money”.

NegativeYoda
NegativeYoda
5 months ago

“Piston housing is shot. Bin the frame”

Zach Overholt
Admin
5 months ago
Reply to  NegativeYoda

The actual bake caliper housing can be removed from the frame and fork, and presumably replaced.

Alex
Alex
5 months ago

Nice 3D rendering!
But far far far from being ridable… Buzz buzz buzz…

Neil Simpson
Neil Simpson
5 months ago
Reply to  Alex

Not a rendering , just beautiful photographs by a very talented guy

Anonymous
Anonymous
5 months ago
Reply to  Neil Simpson

How do you steer the renders where the stem is seamlessly connected to the headtube?

everythingisawesome
everythingisawesome
5 months ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Neil
Neil
5 months ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Not renders, just very precise engineering. Real bikes in the photos.

Modesto
Modesto
5 months ago

Divine.

Mike Murray
Mike Murray
5 months ago

Would be interesting to know the stem clamp/adjustment design

Ryan
Ryan
5 months ago

Caliper alignment.

Roger Pedacter
Roger Pedacter
5 months ago

This is such a weird co-branding. From their designs and finishing, I always thought Laverack was just bringing in Taiwanese frames because there was nothing interesting about them. It seems like Sturdy or someone else with history in 3DP would have been a more natural choice.

I guess JL had a hidden talent none of us knew about. Unless AM did the design work? Which would make much more sense…

El Babaduk
El Babaduk
5 months ago
Reply to  Roger Pedacter

Yeah, this doesn’t make sense for Aston Martin. J. Laverack frames are slightly better than mediocre Taiwanese made and Aston clearly did the design work. But why?

Ryan
Ryan
4 months ago

I think this encompasses everything that’s wrong with cycling. It’s not about money or cafe stop d1ck swinging. It’s about riding. Doesn’t matter what your on, as l9ng as your riding it.

NEIL SIMPSON
NEIL SIMPSON
4 months ago
Reply to  Ryan

It’s an interesting point of view. Plenty of people think bicycles are just tools, and you should ride whatever does the job. I think it’s born from the idea that the bicycle was born fully formed as the Rover safety in 1885. There are also plenty of people who think bikes are, or can be “art”. Nearly every other product exists in ultimate versions as well as more basic forms. See cars, hi-fi, watches etc. Getting as wide an audience as possible interested in bicycles seems like a good idea.

Bartthebikeman
Bartthebikeman
4 months ago

I really appreciate the aesthetics but such level of integration is a big no no for me. Things DO go wrong and BREAK so the essential question for some fanboys here is, how long the design will be supported for. In a current climate, purtting your money in a unproven prioprietary design from a small company is a high risk proposition.

Bill
Bill
4 months ago

I think what is good about this is that it is pushing the boundaries of design and technology. This is what happens in motorsport and eventually trickles down into mainstream cars.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.