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Jagwire spins new CR2 finned brake rotor, Pro Polished brake & shift Cables replace teflon

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Jagwire pro polished brake derailleur cable finned rotor-3

When it comes to brake rotors, cooling fins seem to be the way to go for many companies looking to beat the heat. Popularized by the Shimano Ice-Tech Freeza rotors, other companies like Jagwire are spinning their take on the technology.

Introduced at Eurobike 2014, Jagwire’s CR1 brake rotor is about to get another upgrade with the new CR2…

Jagwire pro polished brake derailleur cable finned rotor-5 Jagwire pro polished brake derailleur cable finned rotor-4

Why introduce another iteration of their finned rotor? It seems to come down to durability and ease of production. While the CR1 uses a three piece design with the steel outer rotor, riveted aluminum cooling fins and an alloy carrier, the CR2 eliminates a lot of the complexity with a single piece of aluminum. Instead of the fins riveted to the rotor, they are now one piece with the carrier which will make them both easier to manufacture and reduce the potential for any durability issues. Shown here in prototype form, expect to see a production version as soon as Eurobike or Interbike.

Jagwire pro polished brake derailleur cable finned rotor-2

Perhaps not as exciting as the new brake rotors, Jagwire’s new Pro Polished Inner Wires are just as important. Jagwire took the uncoated cable to the next level with their Elite Ultra Slick which uses a high level of polishing to offer an uncoated cable that is incredibly smooth. The benefit is that there is no coating to flake off after use meaning consistent performance. The down side is that the process is expensive making the cables a premium option.

The new Pro Polished Inner Wires use the same process, just less of it. That works out to performance that is almost as good but as low as $12 a cable. The Pro Polished Inner Wires also represent the end of Teflon coated cables for Jagwire – the polished cables are just as slick, but without the need for an additional coating. Expect to see these this winter in both brake and shift with individual cables and file boxes available.

jagwire.com

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Eric Schiller
Eric Schiller
6 years ago

“$12 a cable”

Wow, talk about incentive to go electronic.

myke2241
myke2241
6 years ago
Reply to  Eric Schiller

Not really. Go buy some XTR or DA cable sets from your LBS.

Bill
Bill
6 years ago
Reply to  myke2241

Which are smooth as butter for the first two months then clog up with the crappy teflon coating that comes off and gets lodged in the ferrules 🙂

myke2241
myke2241
6 years ago
Reply to  Bill

never have that issue.

Heffe
Heffe
6 years ago

Do their rotors have a good rep? I have never considered them before.

myke2241
myke2241
6 years ago
Reply to  Heffe

I think this may be their first rotors (probably wrong). Jagwire provides a good amount of OE products and I trust them. I will buy these

TheKaiser
6 years ago
Reply to  Heffe

Don’t have any real world feedback to offer, but their old design didn’t look like it would transfer heat very well from the steel rotor surface to the aluminum cooling fins, as unlike the Shimano, they aren’t a sandwich construction. This one looks like it might be better than the old design, but there is still no mention of how much surface area there is in contact between the alu and steel.

Tim
Tim
6 years ago

This is nice for Lefty users- now they don’t have to choose between their fork and having finned disc rotors (Shimano’s finned rotors only come in Centerlock, and Leftys use six-bolt mounting).

Bill
Bill
6 years ago
Reply to  Tim

Only the 140mm are centerlock only. 160 and above you can get in centerlock or 6 bolt with icetech. I’ve never seen 140’s on anything but road and cross bikes, so lefty users are fine.

i
i
6 years ago
Reply to  Bill

@bill: wrong. The RT99 ‘freeza’ (finned) rotors are centerlock only in all sizes. The rt86, which has an al center but no fins is 6-bolt, but not the same thing.

Tim
Tim
6 years ago
Reply to  i

@i- Forsooth.

me
me
6 years ago

weight on the rotors?

bearCol
bearCol
6 years ago

How about a cable that doesn’t brake because of clutch tension. I’m going through cables 10 times as fast as I did before clutch mechs.

Tim
Tim
6 years ago
Reply to  bearCol

@ bearCol: maybe you’re already doing this, but you could keep the clutch turned off a) when you’re not riding and b) when you’re riding on the road to the trailhead (if you do that)/ on long smooth sections of trail. Those two things together probably are 99% of the time and would greatly reduce the stress on your cables. Also- I can’t remember the last time I had a thrown chain WITHOUT a clutch derailleur. Unless you’re running 1X, the chances of you throwing your chain are nil. If you are running 2X or 3X, you could just turn off the clutch for good.

bearCol
bearCol
6 years ago
Reply to  Tim

I recently loosened my clutch I bit to see if that will help. The chain is flopping around a bit more on the dh but I have upper retention so no drops yet.

i
i
6 years ago
Reply to  bearCol

so, in your mind, the clutch, which doesn’t even affect the part of the derailleur where the cable attaches, somehow causes cabled to break? You’ve looked at a derailleur and convinced yourself that is what must be happening?

You’re sure you aren’t just experiencing the well-documented Sram 10s derailleur problem where they chew through cables at the knuckle (in both clutch and non-clutch versions)?

bearCol
bearCol
6 years ago
Reply to  i

All I know is I’m tearing up cables at a rate much faster than before clutch mechs. I’m running xt, I ran sram for a few years before switching. XT seems to be much worse than sram when it comes to cable wear? I never had issues with non clutch mechs. Maybe it’s the geometry of 11 speed mechs that’s doing it? Whatever it is, tougher cables are something I need.

PFS
PFS
6 years ago
Reply to  bearCol

You need something for sure. But I doubt its stronger cables. We primarily sell and work on bikes with clutch derailleurs and I haven’t seen any difference in cable longevity. Perhaps something is routed incorrectly on the bike or in the derailleur? Where do the cables break at?

Ol'shel'
Ol'shel'
6 years ago
Reply to  PFS

The clutch definitely makes shifting effort higher, and can make the shifting on bikes with already problematic and friction-prone routing really bad. I wouldn’t think it would lead to broken cables, though. Perhaps the problem is another issue that was created at the same time as the switch to the clutch der.

bearCol
bearCol
6 years ago
Reply to  PFS

THey brake where every cable I’ve ever owned brakes: between where it attaches to the mech and where the cable enters the housing. I put a piece of tape where the cable attaches to the mech, but haven’t figured out anything to use where the cable enters the mech. I’m doing nothing different than I’ve done for the past two decades, and have been on the same bike for years. With sram xx1 I would say cable life was about half of what it was before clutches, now with xt it’s out of hand. Two sets of housing, and 4 cables over the past 6 months.

Before clutches I would run cables until the housing was toast which often was a long time and still almost never had cable failures. I’ve met one other guy that talked about short cable life so I know I’m not the only one. I had chronic issues with sram mechs coming loose (that’s why I’m on xt) and mentioned it on this site with no one else sharing my experience; then sram changed their design and announced there was an issue on bikes that had chain growth. What was happening is the clutch was backing off the attachment bolt. Well if the mech is being yanked on enough to back off the bolt, you know the cable is feeling that force too. All sram did to address this issue is add a bushing so the mech pivots around the bolt smoother. The cable is still feeling that extra force that used to be absorbed by the pulley cage swinging forward.

Tim
Tim
6 years ago
Reply to  bearCol

Did you read my comment about turning off the clutch between rides?

Mattie Davitt
6 years ago

I’ve used CR1 rotors with no issues for the last year on my trail bike. I had freeza centerlocks previously, and they seem on par.

Tim
Tim
6 years ago

Also, I’d like to see these things’ cooling abilities compared to Shimano Freeza rotors, which to me look like they have far more surface area on the cooling fins.

mac
mac
6 years ago

Great idea by them to make an option with black fins. They look much better.

Cristian
Cristian
6 years ago

But the aluminium fin don’t come from the center of the rotor, are only added aluminium parts to a simple steel rotor. In the shimano RT99 the fin come from the center of the rotor, the contact area is all the rotor surface, not the edges (very little area). The shimano RT99 has a problem because there are not connection between the fin and the spider (there are a steel interface only, no aluminium), the new dura ace rotor do that because the spider and the aluminium center are the same.

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