2016-08-03 IMG_8377

The Canfiled Brothers spent 7 years designing their original wafer-like Crampon Ultimate platform pedals. Now, after four years of shredding trail, they’ve upped the ante again. They took their super thin, durable, downhill-worthy pedals and stretched out the platform as well as the maintenance intervals… that is if there ever was any. While they didn’t want to ruin a good thing, they knew there was a demand for a wider platform.

Check out the details ahead on the new Crampon Mountain pedal, and what they did to create a zero-maintenance platform pedal…

2016-08-03 IMG_8381

photos: Trey Richardson

When Canfield Brothers first revealed the Crampon Ultimate pedals, they claimed to lower a rider’s “virtual” bottom bracket height by 8mm/.25″ and increase the ground clearance by just as much over a standard platform pedal. This is important, as lowering your center of gravity by a quarter inch gives even the best riders a little edge while the quarter inch of increased ground clearance can take the edge off a close call. Canfield saw room for improvement, and on paper, it sounds pretty good… too good?

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The new Crampon Mountain pedals do jump up in weight to 400 (claimed) grams with the added material over the Ultimates which come in at 342 grams. This is still considered pretty light for such a robust set of pedals.

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The revised Crampon Mountains are not replacing the Crampon Ultimates as some like the narrower profile. They are taking over for the Crampon Classic to be the widest pedal in their lineup with similar features to the reveered Crampon Ultimates. They incorporated their patented convex shape, double sided pins that can be unscrewed from either side and super thin 6mm striking edges. The thin profile of the Crampon pedals is designed to not only increase ground clearance but is shaped to glance off any sort of ground contact rather than bite into it. If you look carefully to the far right, the angle of the pedal’s edge is in line with the lower front pins so they have less tendency to grab… and toss you into an Olympic level Yard Sale. The new Crampon Mountain pedals also spread out a little more with a 112 X 106mm platform over the Crampon Ultimate’s 105 X 105mm.

*Non-Pro tip: For those footlocker folks out there thinking about giving platforms a try consider this. Due to the massive width and overall size of platforms compared to most all clipless mountain bike pedals (trail pedals included), there is a significant reduction in pedalable cornering clearance. And not only is there the increased chance of snagging a pedal when pedaling through a turn, but when a “typical” platform pedal catches… it’s game over.

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Compared to the Crampon Ultimate (right), the Crampon Mountain’s axle extends to the outer edges and houses a set of stacked bearings with the DU bushing still at the crank side. The new configuration is said to be virtually maintenance free whereas the Crampon Ultimate requires the bushings to be replaced and a little fresh grease shoved in it after extended abuse. They come with pins Loctited in so they don’t loosen and even put Loctite on the full set of spare pins so they’re ready to install. They come out of the box without the center pin installed, but you can choose to do so if you need a little more traction. Another thing they’re not changing is the price. The new Crampon Mountains are available on Canfield Brothers’ web store for the same $149 as their Crampon Ultimates.

I’m going to slap these on and put them through the paces for a while to see how they feel and hold up, so keep an eye out for a full review in the near future.

Features:
● 400 grams
● Thin 6mm front impact edges
● 112mm x 106mm wide platforms
● Anodized finish, available in 10 colors
● Sealed bearing/DU bushing system
● Chromoly axle
● Replaceable dual sided pins
● Patented convex shape

CanfieldBrothers.com

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bearCol
bearCol
5 years ago

Coolest looking pedals on the market but I can’t live with the convex shape. I’ve owned a bunch of flats over the years including some of the thinest options. Personally I believe the point of diminishing returns with thickness is passed when concavity is compromised.

Ol'shel'
Ol'shel'
5 years ago
Reply to  bearCol

Look at your shoe when it’s loaded and on the pedal. It’s no longer fitting that concave shape. Convex makes sense and is more comfortable.

bearCol
bearCol
5 years ago
Reply to  Ol'shel'

Each to their own. I know some like flat or convex but regardless of what may actually be going on with the shape of my shoe, I can feel a big difference in pedals with deep concave vs those with small amounts. In the end the only thing that matters is whether you personally like the feel/grip of any given pedal geometry.

I wish I liked convex because crampons do offer great clearance. My dmr valuts can’t match that, but dmr dialed in just the right amount of concavity for my taste and I’ll take the extra thickness in trade.

bergsteiger
bergsteiger
5 years ago
Reply to  bearCol

bearCol, I was with your thinking years back, and loved my Kona jack sh*t pedals. and hated the original 50/50 pedals for being too flat. was looking for thinner and concave.

I went out on a limb and bought the Canfeild ultimates to try them even though convex. Best decision for me ever. I now run flats 75% of the time and love them. All other pedals feel mostly meh to me any more. I use them all year round and swap them in on the fatbike for the winter too.

As noted below you can dial in a bit of concave feeling with the shorter pins in the middle.

personally will probably pick up a new set to have the new bearings over bushings.
I did just have to replace bushings and the end spring washers in a campground over last weekend. While not terrible the longer service interval should be nice.

Kovas
Kovas
5 years ago

7 years designing … a pedal? That’s gotta be a typo.

Dominic Porter
5 years ago
Reply to  Kovas

Not everyone has an accelerated weathering lab at their disposal. They’d have to test longevity the old fashioned way. Going through real world bearing service and boulder bashing I guess.

Birdman
Birdman
5 years ago

I love, LOVE my Crampon Ultimate panels!

Birdman
Birdman
5 years ago
Reply to  Birdman

*pedals …

bill
bill
5 years ago

BELLINGHAM!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Carry on.

i
i
5 years ago

I’ve been running Crampon Mags for a few years now, my only gripe being I wish they were a little bigger…

The Convex shape is perfect (and you can sort of adjust by running the shorter pins in the center, and the longer ones on the edges), and it’s just about impossible to pedal strike – when I do hit something, it’s the bottom of my shoe, not the pedal that hangs lowest. Plus the double-headed pins that you can still easily remove when bent…