Home > Clothing-Gear-Tools

MagLOCK’s key to the Vault: Lighter weight magnetic pedals

23
Support us! Bikerumor may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

maglock-vault-plastic-composite-magnetic-pedal-system-1

When MagLOCK first popped up, their magnetic pedals were novel – but also incredibly heavy. It wasn’t long until version two came about after a failed Kickstarter that slashed a big portion of weight from the aluminum pedals to get them under 1000g. In the spirit of continuous improvement, MagLOCK is about to introduce their newest magnetic pedal to the world, the Vault.

Taking a page from the original MagLOCK pedal, the Vault includes a customizeable magnetic retention system. However, the pedal manages to get the weight even lower with an all new body…

maglock-vault-plastic-composite-magnetic-pedal-system-6

Rather than aluminum, the Vault relies on a plastic composite body. We’ve seen a number of companies move to plastic composite pedal construction and while it sounds like they wouldn’t be as durable, but pedals like the RaceFace Chester prove that composite materials can be surprisingly stout. Keeping with their magnetic retention story, the Vault will include up to 10 rare earth magnets per pedal which are housed in between two stainless steel plates that provide up to 30 lbs of attractive force. Users can customize the amount of magnetic force by adding or removing magnets which attract the SPD compatible steel plates on your clipless shoes.

maglock-vault-plastic-composite-magnetic-pedal-system-5 maglock-vault-plastic-composite-magnetic-pedal-system-3

maglock-vault-plastic-composite-magnetic-pedal-system-4

Still in the prototype phase, the Vault is about to be released on Kickstarter sometime in November. Pricing is still to be announced, but the big story here is the weight. The lightest aluminum MagLOCK pedals come in at 974g with all of the magnets. If the Vault makes good on its promise, the weight will drop to 600g making it much more competitive with other pedals. You can stay up to date with MagLOCK’s vault here.

 

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

23 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
gibbon
gibbon
6 years ago

And when it fails for the 2nd time on kickstarter despite being comparable weight to regular pedals,will then then realise the actual issue?

What Up T Benz
What Up T Benz
6 years ago

Wonder what DMR thinks about their name for this pedal

pTymnWolfe
6 years ago

“Magnets! How do they work?”

Seraph
Seraph
6 years ago
Reply to  pTymnWolfe

It’s a miracle.

ZigaK
ZigaK
6 years ago
Reply to  pTymnWolfe

JD Salinger Presents Magnets: How Do They work? Do They attract Things?? Let’s Find Out!

Fall
Fall
6 years ago
Reply to  ZigaK

Hahaha! That’s perfect!

Seraph
Seraph
6 years ago

The sad part is that a nice set of wide, concave flat pedals will provide more grip and be quite a bit lighter than these.

LS
LS
6 years ago

I ruined a set of Chesters in 3 rides. Composite is not a good material for mountain biking.

Mike D
6 years ago
Reply to  LS

I have a different take–a season and a half in the PNW on Deity Compound composite pedals, no problems. On the trail bike, not the big bike, but I’ve ridden the heck out of them without issue. One plus is that they are a solid color all the way through, so scrapes actually don’t looks so bad!

VazzedUp
VazzedUp
6 years ago

Did chat to a guy that loved these, the pins provide the grip, the magnets just align you feet correctly. So like an spd your foot is always in the right spot, but like a flat, getting out is easier. Loosing 30% of their weight may make these a viable choice.

Groghunter
Groghunter
6 years ago
Reply to  VazzedUp

If so, they need to learn better pedal pin design, because what I’m seeing here is terrible.6 pins, & 2 are almost at midpedal? negatory ghost rider.

Beeb
Beeb
6 years ago

Might have an issue with the DMR trademark for Vault pedals.

Zoso
Zoso
6 years ago

Seems like the plate that covers the magnets could be reworked to snap in or at least only have 1-2 bolts that are flush holding it all together.

Groghunter
Groghunter
6 years ago
Reply to  Zoso

I don’t even see a reason it needs to be metal. make it plastic with some small countersunk screws. Or just cut & thread the back of the magnets, & screw them into place from the back.

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
6 years ago
Reply to  Zoso

I could be wrong, by my impression is that those bolt heads help to secure the “cleat”/pedal interface, because they prevent the shoe/cleat from being slid forward or rearward on the pedal, which would allow for an easy disengagement even without pulling against the magnetic resistance. From the reviews I have seen on these, it would almost make sense to put more of those along the sides of the plates too, to prevent twisting out too.

Cheese
Cheese
6 years ago

Black oxide should last roughly one rainy ride before rusting.

Jon
Jon
6 years ago

Anybody know if repeated impact would eventually decrease the magnetic power?

MuhammedMuhammed
MuhammedMuhammed
6 years ago
Reply to  Jon

Think about how magnets work. If you can’t think about it, Google. Then apply your new knowledge. The answer is no, but also possibly yes. The magnets themselves will lose strength over time, but neodinyium and other rare earth magnets will last longer than the pedal. Repeated impacts won’t effect the magnets.

Beat_the_trail
Beat_the_trail
6 years ago
Reply to  Jon

Google probably does.

TheKaiser
TheKaiser
6 years ago
Reply to  Jon

I’ve wondered this too, and the answer is still not clear to me. The same goes for magnetic engagement rear hubs. And don’t let the haters dissuade your inquiry with the “Just Google it” responses.

hellbelly
hellbelly
6 years ago

Obviously this design has its fans and some merit. That said, the additional weight and less than ideal retention will make it less appealing to advanced riders. There is no doubt that clip in pedals can be daunting to a new rider. However, there are ones available that reduce the learning curve. I began using Time ATAC pedals in ’95 and I still use them. They remain the simplest clipless design on the market. I can teach anyone to ride them confidently in thirty minutes or less. Furthermore, they require zero maintenance. I always say the French got wine, cheese and pedals right.

Antoine
Antoine
6 years ago
Reply to  hellbelly

Time MTB are unmatched. I’ll never understand why so much people ride shimano.

dsand
dsand
6 years ago

Just clip in. None of the benefits of being attached, but with added weight and a stupid slippery pedal. If you literally can’t move your foot sideways away from your pedal letting your foot twist and making you unclip, how is this better?

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.

Subscribe Now

Sign up to receive BikeRumor content direct to your inbox.