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MAMIL movie explores the world of men in Lycra for one night, worldwide showing

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If you’re a cyclist (especially a middle aged male), you may already be familiar with the term MAMIL. Short for Middle Aged Male In Lycra, it could be misconstrued as an insult, but for many, it’s a term of endearment. In order to better understand this mindset, a new documentary is set to air in theaters across the globe later this month.

In a partnership with Cycliq, MAMIL will be showing in Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, the UK, and the USA, all on Wednesday February 21st. There are a handful of theaters that will also show the film on Monday, April 9th, but the majority of theaters will show the film on the same night in February.

Narrated by Phil Ligget (who else?), the documentary is the work of Nickolas Bird, Mark Bird, and Eleanor Sharpe, and focuses on the underlying motivations of different MAMILs around the world.

Here in the U.S., the film will be presented by Demand Film through special arrangements with Regal, Edwards, and UA Cinemas. Tickets must be purchased in advance, and you can find the closes theater and order tickets here.

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JBikes
JBikes
5 years ago

I always thought the term applied to those “older” riders that, while not racing, view every ride where they are near someone as some type of crit or stage race. Like the marker of someone displaying their waning drops of testosterone with fierce aggressiveness.

Cactaur
Cactaur
5 years ago

What about Eroica Freds?

Heffe
Heffe
5 years ago

I have no doubt that every demographic of cyclists can be seen as completely ridiculous, given the right perspective.

Crash Bandicoot
Crash Bandicoot
5 years ago
Reply to  Heffe

Hit the nail on the head; All of us look ridiculous in cycling kit which is one of the things that endeared me to the sport at 275lbs. Now at 159 lbs I look slightly less ridiculous but still realize that I’m dressing up like a superhero to go do intervals in the park.

JBikes
JBikes
5 years ago

Great story and congrats! Always nice hearing how cycling has changes lives for (what I assume is) the better.

Kernel Flickitov
Kernel Flickitov
5 years ago

No term of endearment here, MAMILS SUCK! I discovered the lowest form of MAMIL while commuting to work in Denver. We call them “bikepathaletes”. At least twice a year I’ll come across an accident scene, EMT’s in full attendance with stretchers and neck braces at the ready, typical MAMIL chasing the Strava segment around the same blind corner on Cherry Creek (a busy multi-use path) and goes head on with somebody coming from the opposite direction. And it’s always the fault of the middle aged man dressed like a dumb ass euro pro, always.

Darryl
Darryl
5 years ago

Perhaps you should get out more. Have a look at the average age of most pelatons – you would be surprised. These are often MAMILS . Most very knowledgeable and skilled riders.

JBikes
JBikes
5 years ago
Reply to  Darryl

I think Kernel is describing MAMIL outside of “middle-age” and more how they ride in certain situations. I know this path, and many like them. I think the problem is multi-fold.

1) Bike path designers seemingly take into account only the recreational cyclist/commuter. Speed differentials between them and a “roadie” may be high. Kernel’s story is true; however, all users need to adjust speed and lines given the paths established general use and sight lines. It is ALWAYS assumed the lycra clad one is wrong because they are easy to blame but I see poor path etiquette from many users. The casual poor bike handling individual that crosses over a line or does something stupid is always assumed innocent if hit by someone faster, especially if they are in roadie kit. Conversely, I see “MAMILs” not adjusting speed down when riding through large groups of families, children, etc. These are the stereotypical “bikepathathletes” Kernel references. Problems on both sides…

2) Once a bike path is in, roads nearby tend to be “closed off” in a cultural sense to bike traffic that may be better suited to the “MAMIL”. I often will hear “why don’t you use the bike path”….”well its because to get the exercise I want I am traveling at 2x the speed of the other users…” Its hard to understand this unless you experience it. It often very hard for non-cyclists to realize how fast and far a fit person can go on a bike. I think many municipalities don’t consult cyclists during design of bike paths.

3) Shared use paths are generally stupid unless very well made and its culturally accepted that pedestrians don’t walk on the bike section (come to SoCal beaches where they have dedicated bike and pedestrian paths…you’ll get yelled at and a possible ticket if you ride on the pedestrian side or sidewalk and yet there are countless pedestrians on the “bike only” path and nothing is said).
If sharing is required, there needs to be a set flowpath. IMO, walkers should walk on the left and cyclist ride on the right. That way the pedestrian isn’t being passed “blind” and all users are relying on sigh not sound.

4) The lack of awareness of many (on all sides). I can’t count the number of times I have ridden to work going a normal pace (~15mph) only to have people (pedestrians, runners, cyclists, rollerbladers, etc) change lines/step out without checking over their shoulders…I then get yelled at. Many people seem to assume that once they are moving nothing is coming up behind them. Add to this the prevalent use of earphones at a volume they can’t hear a bell or your announcement.

Goliath
Goliath
5 years ago

Demeaning. Exclusionary. Lack of comprehension surrounding standard first aid. Persecutory. I-Know-Best’ism. Supreme insight and attribution of fault.

Donald? Is that you?

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