Morgan Blue spreads new disc brake silencing paste on your pads

Morgan Blue disc brake silencing paste for noisy disc brake rotor squealingI’ve tried everything imaginable to silence a noisy set of disc brakes, going so far as to switch brakesets altogether. Short of that, I’ve snugged every imaginable bolt, scrubbed the pads and even applied a small patch of Dynamat to the rotor’s spider. About the only thing’s that worked somewhat was when I used a metal file brush to clean the rotors.

Morgan Blue has heard the collective annoying squealing all too clearly and come up with a solution. It’s called Brake Silencer Paste, and it goes on the brake pads.

But not that side of the pads. It goes on the back of the pads between them and the pistons, taking up any space and quashing the vibrations that tend to howl. It’s a non-corrosive product that they say holds up to heat and stays put for a long time.

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goridebikes
goridebikes
6 years ago

Been done on automotive applications for a looonnnngggg time!

I LOVE the visual of dynamat on a brake rotor however.

Blowtorch
Blowtorch
6 years ago

I have had great success with isopropyl on the rotor and a blowtorch on the pads until they stop smoking. Even organic pads. Then again, I don’t run Avid hydro’s.

chasejj
chasejj
6 years ago

I would try this stuff. On the worst of my squealing brakes when a new set of pads doesn’t solve the problem. It is a rotor issue.

I take the rotor off and lay it on a flat surface, then take a 5″ round orbital sander with a pretty aggressive grit sandpaper pad and go to town on the braking surfaces. It basically resurfaces the rotor. This will typically fix the issue for a good amount of time. . Until I glaze the rotor again.

Xmus Jaxon Flaxon Waxon
Xmus Jaxon Flaxon Waxon
6 years ago

One could also try making sure the posts are flat and then braking correctly. . .

Jack
Jack
6 years ago

Yet again more proof of the pesky nature of disc brakes. Yet reading here you would think no one ever has a problem. Hmmmmm………

greg
greg
6 years ago

Any type of brake can be noisy, rim brakes included. Before anyone says to just toe the pads in, sometimes that doesn’t do it. like anything, there are standard fixes for most but there is the occasional elusive problem that requires more drastic solutions. Just like the automotive equivalent, I doubt this will be very effective.

Chris
Chris
6 years ago

SwissStop Disc Brake Silencer is the other solution. Works perfect on resin/organic pads and no loss of braking power with correct application
https://youtu.be/mcq9KcYl_BM

mudcycles
6 years ago

We’ve been successfully using copper slip like this to quieten brakes for a few years now.
I’d be interested to see how much (if any) more effective the morgan blue would be IRL.
I’m picking it’s going to be more expense than the copper slip (especially given the way the NZ agent charges like a wounded bull for pretty much everything they sell).

Jimmy-narwhal
Jimmy-narwhal
6 years ago

Gotta love the B.I business model! Unfortunately they lost the Morgan blue agency long ago…

Al
Al
6 years ago

The problem with copperslip is it melts when hot and can drop onto the rotor. Plus it can degrade the piston seals of the calliper (Hope specifically say not to use Copperslip for that reason).

antoine
antoine
6 years ago

Well I don’t see the use of this, mud does it for me in winter time.

In summer just clean your bike after each ride and you’ll not need this

antoine
antoine
6 years ago

And also like the people who do extreme 4×4 driving say, it’s when you don’t hear any braking sound that you have to worry….

fergus
fergus
6 years ago

agreed copper slip would be the last thing I would be putting near a bike disc brake. The piston on shimano hydro are ceramic and do not require lubrication with grease between the piston and pad backing. Unsure how a lubricant wound stop vibration of the pad in the brake calliper and prevent the squealing sound, although applying the grease to the front of the pad will for sure prevent it.

Venge
Venge
6 years ago

Problem : noisy disk brakes.
Solution : next time remember to bed them in before your ride your new bike.

Problem 2 : noisy Sram disk brakes
Solution : don’t buy Sram disk brakes.

Mitch
6 years ago

Blowtorch is right –

-Torch the pads lightly until they smoke a little bit, usually a couple seconds, which cooks off any oils or grease.

-Sand the pad lightly with fresh sandpaper. You should see the copper particles really clearly after removing that top layer of burnt pad.

-Clean the rotor with brake cleaner or another similar chemical that is stronger than isopropol.

-Dry rotor with a fresh papertowl, NOT a new or used rag.

-Reassemble and repeat bed-in procedure.

-Done!

alex
6 years ago

Clean pad and true rotors are quite brakes. Do a little maintenance and do not use this crap.

mac
mac
6 years ago

The container has a piece of paper inside that says “throw away your sram brakes moron”.

Mountain Dew Drinking Flatbiller
Mountain Dew Drinking Flatbiller
6 years ago

Ahh, this must be what Shimano XTRs build into their brakes, because I haven’t heard a peep out of them since converting from SRAM years ago.

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
6 years ago

@fergus the grease, or grease-like stuff acts as a damper to quell vibration of the pad backing against the piston. Like this stuff for cars http://crcindustries.com/auto/?s=05115

Elk
Elk
6 years ago

My observation may tick off the engineers and armchair engineers on this site.

As a shop monkey for many years, I have unscientific ally observed that shorter length pads create the infamous howl whereas longer pass tend to be quiet.

Regarding pad preps, I have isopropyled, torched, and backed pads with CRC Brake Quiet. I even tried Dyna-Mat. Nothing really helped Avids with exception of a slight improvement with the use of organic pads. The only brakes worse than Avids were Coda single pistons on early 4 bolt Cannondales. Long pads like Shimanos, Hopes, or Grimecas never game me issues personally.

Elk
Elk
6 years ago

^ ooof, sorry for the spelling errors.

Matt
Matt
6 years ago

I had this problem for ages. Tried all the different cleaners and the things would be quiet for a mile and a half and then back to squealing as the saying goes, ‘like a stuck pig’. Went to almost 25 bike shops asking about it before someone told me…
1. The regular cleaners are just Isopropryl Alcohol (IPA) which you can buy far cheaper on eBay than in a spray can and
2. The problem was caused by contamination on the pads and to try burning that off in the flame of the cooker.
Burning off the contaminants did solve the problem, but is unreliable as it’s easy to use excess heat which wrecks the pads. I then had a flash of inspiration that has solved the problem since. Here’s what I do:
Wash the pads, front an rear in washing up liquid. Put some washing up liquid on a small piece of medium grade sandpaper. Give the pads a gentle rub, enough to take off any glaze. Rinse and repeat until you can see nice, clean brake pad all over and then rinse thoroughly. Next wash the rotors (I use washing up liquid, water and kitchen towel for this). Now, for your first few brakings, the coefficient of friction is way down and your brakes will be very poor, so do several test brakings somewhere safe to boil off the water and any remaining washing up liquid, but then you should have excellent brakes back again. Been doing it for years now and it works a treat. If that doesn’t work, get yourself some better brakes ie the outstanding Shimano XT BR-785 or road equiv with ICE rotors, or whatever the current version is.

Nick
Nick
6 years ago

I like to make sure the rotor is clean with Isopropyl Alcohol, then move to the pads. Re-finish the pad with a Dremel and sanding attachment (not cutting wheel), then use a Dremel and cutting wheel to cut “X”‘s (or a couple) into the pad. Lastly, if this doesn’t work, I put them in our microwave oven at 400 for 5 minutes. Never had any problems after that.

If they’re still noisy, it’s obvious they’re riding on Avid Juicy’s, and they should have those warranteed already 😛

Too Slow
Too Slow
6 years ago

Everyone says how much better Shimano breaks are, but I have 2 bikes with XT disks (one brand new), and they both squeal so loud I am embarrassed to use my breaks. I have had 2 bikes with Avid/SRAM and never had an issue – they’ve always been quiet and worked perfectly. The shop has been no help getting them to quite down. Any ideas? I don’t understand.

Jon
Jon
6 years ago

Buy shimano and this is a non-issue. SRAM should be ashamed of their brakes.

IdontKnowAnything
IdontKnowAnything
6 years ago

Some good things and some bad. First lets start with how brakes work. When you bed new brakes in you are transferring pad material to the rotor. Once all the valleys are filled with pad material your brakes are working at their peak.

Noise comes from materials resonating. Some brakes are just noisier then others even when everything is right. Rotors that have a pattern that can repeat in the length of the pad will cause vibration. As the gas/air that gets trapped in the holes in the rotors expands while passing through the pads and then releases causing vibration. Sometimes this creates noise and sometimes it doesn’t. This will cause particular frames to resonate creating a squeal that sometimes cannot be fixed with the brakes that are on it. Changing rotors, pads and even brakes may not fix all problems.

Most squeaking brakes are condition related. Contamination is a big contributor, so when brakes are contaminated both the rotor and the pads need to be fixed. Surface contamination can be fixed. But sometimes pads and rotors cannot be saved. When cleaning your brakes follow manufactures recommendations, they are different!

As far as the product goes I wouldn’t use it.

Roel
Roel
6 years ago

For all those that wonder…
Morgan Blue is imported by BelgiumBike in Florida.
We sell it MSRP: $13.70

I am sure that there are bikes out there that nothing works for.
But many stores have now used this product as a standard to install disc brakes.
Just like the car industry recommend using their product for car brakes.

It works great and so far none of our dealers had negative feedback.