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NAHBS 2015: DeSalvo Builds 12×142 Ti Gravel Bike with New Paragon Machine Works X-12 Dropouts

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desalvo ti chris king enve (4)

NAHBS is always interesting in that you can stop at a booth and talk to the builder and then wander a few feet away and meet the company that produced the tubes or details like the dropouts for that very bike. For most bikes we probably take the availability of certain dropouts, braze ons, and other parts for granted, but for builders at NAHBS that want to keep the bikes U.S. made down to the last detail, someone has to create those little parts.

That point was illustrated beautifully when we stopped to check out the latest DeSalvo Custom Cycle above, then got a look at the new X-12 titanium dropouts from Paragon Machine Works…

desalvo ti chris king enve (1) enve fork 12mm chris king hub

desalvo ti chris king enve (5)

One of the few builders that got an early sample of the new ENVE GRD Gravel Road Fork, DeSalvo built up this Ti Gravel bike to take advantage. Complete with a complement of orange components from Chris King, the bike also got the new prototype 12mm front hubs from King to allow use of the ENVE’s thru axle.

desalvo ti chris king enve (3)

desalvo ti chris king enve (2)

To match up with the thru axle front, the frame makes use of the new Syntace X-12 compatible dropouts from Paragon Machine Works.

Paragon Machine Works NAHBS syntace x 12 thru axle 142 (4) Paragon Machine Works NAHBS syntace x 12 thru axle 142 (5)

 

Not that DeSalvo would need it, but the Syntace X-12 dropouts are unique in that they offer a 1/2mm or 1mm offset bushing that can be adjusted with a 14mm internal hex wrench. That allows for the wheel’s alignment to be adjusted in the event that the dropouts aren’t welded in perfectly straight. It also offers a 12×142 dropout that is compatible with both Shimano Direct Mount and standard rear derailleurs, and in this case is U.S. made. Available in steel or titanium, Paragon’s X-12 dropouts can use the bolt on axle or a QR like the DT Swiss RWS.

Paragon Machine Works NAHBS syntace x 12 thru axle 142 (1)

Paragon Machine Works NAHBS syntace x 12 thru axle 142 (3) Paragon Machine Works NAHBS syntace x 12 thru axle 142 (2)

 

Paragon also had this new titanium fat bike chainstay yoke to show off as well. Meant to allow for 5″ tires on 100mm rims, the yoke makes it easier for builders to make a stiff chainstay/BB interface that still clears drivetrains and tires. The only drawback is that it will not be cheap (as in $522.15) since it starts out as a seven pound chunk of 6/4 titanium that is machined into two halves that are then to be welded together by the frame builder. Only available in titanium for now, Paragon says they do plan to offer steel in the distant future.

desalvocycles.com

paragonmachineworks.com

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Milessio
Milessio
7 years ago

The titanium fat bike chainstay yoke would seem to be a far better use of 3D printing than Ceramicspeed’s derailleur pulleys. Could well be cheaper than the Paragon fabricated ones & lighter too (as no welding or need for pinning the halves together).

Rich
Rich
7 years ago

Any chance you can up the exposure on some of those shots by 2/3 of a stop se we can see some of the detail?

Frippolini
Frippolini
7 years ago

Producing the chainstay arc like that … What a waste of material and energy, really. Wake up to the 21st century, start 3d printing it instead. Current way of producing it is like making a toothpick by CNC:ing a log of wood.

As for the frame and bike… Very very nice, looks excellent. 🙂

OriginalMarkV
OriginalMarkV
7 years ago

3D printing titanium is apparently more expensive creating a plastic spork prototype…as in very expensive. Given the a ti fatbike chainstay yoke is presumably a low volume item (which does favour 3D printing but maybe not more than CNC milling), I do wonder if another industrial company (since Paragon does NOT do additive manufacturing) could make a comparable 3D print part at a lower cost. And if so, would the yield strength, toughness, and weldability of said part be adequate.

The layperson just assumes that if you can 3D print something in metal, that metal part must be as good or better than what could be made through more conventional processes…and that is a lot to assume.

greg
greg
7 years ago

something so hogged-out, with flowing, organic shape, i would agree lends itself to 3d printing. id be surprised if it would cost THAT much, being that other bike companies are 3d printing ti dropouts n such (raceware direct has 3d ti chain catchers).
if making a bunch of them, ti can be cast with good mechanical properties as well.

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