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NAHBS 2015: Savvy Cycles shows wood a good time

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Savvy Cycles is the brainchild of Mike Mahoney, who brings his diverse background of woodworking skills to frame building. From longboard skateboard manufacturing to teaching woodworking, Mike has spent the last two years perfecting the process of making the wooden bicycle frame. Mike’s primary woods of choice for frame construction are hickory and ash, known for their strength, durability and ability to be steam bent. Woods such as sepele and dyed hard maple are used for frame accents.

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Construction of every Savvy Cycles frameset begins with four CNC milled frame sections, which form the front and rear frame triangles respectively. Each frame piece is milled out internally, with aluminum inserts set in place for the headtube, seat tube and bottom bracket. Internal cable guides are installed following the milling process.

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The frame sections are further milled externally, before the half of the front and rear triangle are bonded together. Two days of handwork follow the bonding process, to finish and smooth the frame. Lamination follows, protecting the frame from the elements.

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Chainstays are cut from a single piece of steam bent, nine ply wood, which ensures consistency in finish. Come lamination time, the wood grains are alternated to maximize strength.

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Savvy Cycles are offered as framesets or complete bicycles in three sizes, with three models to choose from – Mountain Bike 1x Drivetrain, Mountain Bike Single Speed, and Fat Bike. Savvy is based in Grand Junction, Colorado, conveniently close to component manufacturers such as MRP forks and DT Swiss wheels, which feature on many of their complete bicycle builds.

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Frame prices start at $1,850 US for Mountain Bike 1 x Drivetrain and Fat Bike, and $1,800 for Mountain Bike Single Speed. Complete bike prices range from $4,625 to $5,399, dependent on component specifications.

Photos and article by Gravel Cyclist.
Jayson O’Mahoney is the Gravel Cyclist: A website about the Gravel Cycling Experience.

Savvy-Cycles.com

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JBikes
JBikes
7 years ago

These are nice looking wood frames.
Is there any mechanical interface between the 2 halves (biscuits, dowels?)

chasejj
chasejj
7 years ago

Wow. $1800 for a 3rd world solution. The world is literally going backwards.
All those chumps who learned to braze artfully or TIG weld stacked dimes to build a frameset just wasted time.

Wood frames have no purpose other than to place them on the wall to look at. Nobody who is using logic and common sense would even entertain the idea of buying one of these.

Flame me all you want, BR will erase this post in minutes.

phil
phil
7 years ago

How are the halves joined??? and the stays to the front triangle?

Keith
Keith
7 years ago

If “chasejj” has actually ridden a wood bike his opinion might mean something. Otherwise just a loudmouth that wants to hear their own voice. Since I have ridden a Savvy Cycles bike I do understand and voice an honest opinion.

pile-on
pile-on
7 years ago

@chasejj–I don’t think you’re necessarily out of line maybe a bit harsh, clearly someone wants these. I personally will claim perplexed ignorance–is the ride better somehow? Or are these for folks who are nuts for wood? There must be a reason besides–because it can be done, right?

Alain
Alain
7 years ago

Shape obviously inspired from 1991 Corima Puma road frame.

FlyingLotus
FlyingLotus
7 years ago

I grew up in a coastal village in northern Spain where farmers and fishermen used wooden man made artifacts and utensils 2 or even 3 generations old with great longevity and functionality. Boats, carts, ploughs… you name it.

As much as I like the idea of owning a wooden bike, my concerns would be the effects of exposure to temperature changes over time on the wood, the quality of glues used for joining the two frame sections and water/mold damage.

I live in a wet and humid country and my bikes like in the garage. If the company can guarantee 100% pore sealing treatment both on exterior and interior sections of the frame then maybe I would consider it but for now I praise them for the effort and design but I will place my moneys elsewhere

eadm
7 years ago

What, no wooden fork?

Juan Pablo
Juan Pablo
7 years ago

sustainability is such a foreign word to America… you guys thinking the high energy waste, social and chemical impact of so-called high tech frames is high tech… you guys are still in the middle ages. Yeah, burn this world so YOU can have a high tech frame and your fried chicken that grew in a box …

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