Nasal dilation control becomes a thing w/ 100% Speedcraft Air Sunglasses

Forget Breathe Right strips, the future of nasal dilation is here. First leaked back in January, the new 100% Speedcraft Air sunglasses are now official. What makes these different than your typical pair of riding glasses? Mostly, it’s the magnetic nose piece which interfaces with stick on magnetic pads for your nose to hold the glasses in place and allow you to fine tune your “nasal dilation.”

Nasal dilation control becomes a thing w/ 100% Speedcraft Air Sunglasses

As modeled by Peter Sagan in the Tour Down Under, the Speedcraft Air start with a stick on nose strip that is magnetic. The strips attach to your nose with adhesive that is sweat and moisture resistant, and are required for use of the glasses.

Nasal dilation control becomes a thing w/ 100% Speedcraft Air Sunglasses

Each pair of glasses includes 20 nose strips and 10 cleaning towelettes which will let you wear the glasses 10 times before you’ll have to purchase a refill kit with another 20 stickers and 10 towelettes for $15.

Nasal dilation control becomes a thing w/ 100% Speedcraft Air Sunglasses

Once you have the nose strips attached to your face, the glasses are then magnetically attracted to the strips for a secure fit. From there, you can control the actual amount of nasal dilation by rotating the small wheel above the nose piece.

Nasal dilation control becomes a thing w/ 100% Speedcraft Air Sunglasses

Otherwise, the Speedcraft Air is fairly similar to other 100% glasses with a TR90 frame, ultra-grip rubber coated temples, and a HiPER lens with Hydroilo water and oil resistant coating.

The Speedcraft Air retails for $325 and includes the glasses, a hard case, soft bag, and 20 nose strips with 10 cleaning cloths. Replacement HiPER Red mirrored replacment or clear lenses are available separately along with nose strip refill kits.

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17 Comments
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boom
boom
4 years ago

Sagan didn’t race these at Paris-Roubaix, so I’m guessing they don’t make enough of a difference?

JNH
JNH
4 years ago
Reply to  boom

Unless you intend to wear these at night to help with snoring then they’ll offer no benefit at all, just like every other nasal dilation device. Fit a blackout lens and you’ve got a mean sleeping aid, but a blindfold and a box of Breatherights will be much cheaper.

Chuck Albaugh
Chuck Albaugh
4 years ago
Reply to  JNH

The thing is: not everyone needs them. That’s why people don’t think they do anything. Because for most people they dont. But if you do need them (I for example have a partially collapsed sinus) they really do make a difference.

JNH
JNH
4 years ago
Reply to  Chuck Albaugh

A collapsed nasal valve is a valid medical issue that something like this or Breath Rights are indeed a valid treatment option. But these guys are selling on the basis of improved athletic performance, which has been disproved by every peer reviewed study ever carried out on nasal dilators.

Flub
Flub
4 years ago
Reply to  boom

Yeah that’s a sound guess. I’m guessing they make zero difference.

Peter Miller
4 years ago

Nine days late.

Robin
Robin
4 years ago

I’m guessing that the “magnetic nostril openers” give the same performance benefit as Breathe Right strips, which is to say none. Unless a person’s got a deformity, their nostrils aren’t limiting the air they take in.

Simon
Simon
4 years ago

this magnets could help to keep Glasses at right spot on bumpy roads

Beau
4 years ago
Reply to  Simon

This was my first thought. It’s an insane way to keep your glasses from slipping down your nose when you’re sweaty. Effective and ridiculous at the same time.

BMX
BMX
4 years ago

I have to ride through London air everyday can they release a pair that force close the nostrils?

Frederico
Frederico
4 years ago

Any updates on release date for the implant hardware?

Mike
Mike
4 years ago
Reply to  Frederico

I know you’re probably kidding, but I would consider this. My nasal passages are pretty constricted, and if you could choose to open/close them without funny looking stuff glued to the nose, it might be worth the surgery (I assume small metal objects could be implanted through the nostril rather than from outside).

David Rosenthal
David Rosenthal
4 years ago

They should spend more time developing glasses that don’t help funnel sweat directly into your eyes. Got theses (sans magnet add-on) as a gift and went back to my Foakley Jawbreakers because they were getting dangerous (almost crashed in a race when both of my eyes felt like battery acid was poured into them) gave them to a junior with a very different face shape and he had the same issue.

Foolcyclist
Foolcyclist
4 years ago

you got to be *$#@* kidding me.

MaraudingWalrus
MaraudingWalrus
4 years ago

Questionable benefits of breathe-right strips aside, the idea of what is essentially now a subscription based sunglass is wild!

Provided you managed to ride an avg of 5x a week, using these every time… that’s a refill kit every two weeks. So that’s….another $390 to use your sunglasses for a year…on top of their $325 retail price. These puppies get more expensive as you use them!

Evan
Evan
4 years ago

Solution: magnetic nostril studs.

MTB4me
MTB4me
4 years ago

so no….but can I just get the cleaning towelettes, please?