Now you can charge your Garmin head unit while riding or at the cafe–and leave the cable at home. Garmin could have stopped there, but  there’s much more to the new Edge 1040 unit. What Garmin calls the “ultimate GPS bike computer” boasts solar charging, multi-band GNSS, real-time stamina insights, and a slew of performance metrics that can help you perform better every season. 

Garmin Edge 1040 and Edge 1040 Solar

The new Garmin Edge 1040 cycling head units arrive in two options; solar ($750) and standard non-solar ($600). The $150 price difference is substantial, but so are the benefits if you’re a full-time adventurer. 

Harnessing the power of the sun 

I feel like it has been a long time coming with the Garmin Fenix solar watches, but it finally hit the Edge. Garmin employs the same Power Glass solar charging lens on its watches to deliver less time between charges and insights on battery recharging, all without taking up much of the 3.5-inch touch screen display. 

The new Power Glass solar charging lens extends the battery life to up to 100 hours in battery saver mode, giving cyclists back 42 minutes per hour during daytime riding. Plus — when you turn your Edge 1040 Solar off, the unit continues to collect a charge, instructing you in intensity and placement.

Garmin Edge 1040 Solar shut donw charging

It’s a game-changer for those who forget to charge their head units frequently (quietly raises hand), and it seems Garmin knows they touched on something unique.

What’s new — Garmin Edge 1040/1040 Edge Solar

Though the solar charging feature is quite fantastic, the new Edge 1040 does have more to offer, enough to provide a unit without the solar charging capabilities. 

The Garmin “case” makes a comeback, as the Edge 1040 arrives with a soft-touch silicone protective case and three different mounting options. The unit is slightly different from the standard Garmin Edge shape, it’s a bit slimmer, with metal buttons and an alloy machined half-turn mounting piece. Garmin updated the charging power from a Micro USB to Type-C. 

Updated Features — Garmin Edge 1040/1040 Solar

  • Pinpoint GNSS accuracy: The Edge 1040 offers multi-band GNSS technology, giving better positional accuracy and coverage, even in challenging environments. 
  • Course demands: Classify strengths and weaknesses as a cyclist, focus on improvement, and prepare for the demands of a specific track or course.
  • Power guide: Recommended power targets make it easier to manage efforts throughout a course.
  • Stamina insights: Monitor and track exertion levels in real-time during a ride with help from Garmin Connect real-time feedback. 
  • Simple setup: Custom ride profiles prepopulate based on previous Edge data, ride types, and sensors. Cycling activity profiles can be managed directly on your compatible smartphone from the Garmin Connect intelligent device app.
  • Weight: 135g (actual)

Training and performance guidance 

To help cyclists boost their performance, the Edge 1040 and 1040 Solar provide insights from Firstbeat Analytics such as VO2 max (estimated), recovery time, training load, training focus, and more to see how their body responds to their training efforts. If you have a Garmin watch or wearable, you can benefit even more from the training algorithm, as it will gather sleep data, HRV, and non-training stress — all of which affect athletic performance. 

The Edge 1040/1040 Solar will offer training session suggestions based on their current training load and VO2 max for those looking for some ride inspiration. 

Like heat and altitude acclimation from the prior units, the Edge 1040 Solar lets riders see how their bodies hold up in different environments. 

ClimbPro lets riders see the remaining ascent and grade for each climb when following a course and review their performance on the climbs post-ride right from the Edge 1040 Solar or in Garmin Connect. Meanwhile, mountain bike metrics, including jump count, jump distance, hang time, grit, and flow, track every ride’s epic details.

Updated navigation, mapping, and connected apps 

Whether riding through busy cities or exploring remote areas, the Edge 1040 Solar includes advanced navigational tools to help cyclists stay on track. High-contrast, ride-type-specific maps use Trendline popularity routing to highlight popular roads and trails based on billions of miles of ride data that other users have uploaded to Garmin Connect.

The new Edge 1040 Solar utilizes the TrailForks app for mountain bike navigation, and riders can view routes and trail details from more than 80 countries. Riders can navigate easily with turn-by-turn navigation, and alerts notify riders of sharp curves ahead. When using the Trailforks app, “Forksight” mode automatically displays upcoming forks in the route and where a rider is within a trail network.

Safety and connectivity

If you’re using the new Varia or Garmin Connect, the new Edge 1040/1040 Solar has quite a few safety features. LiveTrack lets loved ones follow a cyclist’s real-time location and view their entire preplanned course to see where they’re headed, while group messaging and tracking let cyclists stay in touch when they get separated from the pack.

For added confidence while riding, the Edge 1040 Solar is compatible with the Varia line of cycling awareness devices, including the new Varia RCT715 rearview radar with the camera and tail light, so cyclists can see and continuously capture video footage during their ride.

The Edge 1040 Solar also works with inReach devices so cyclists can view and reply to messages, share trip data and trigger interactive SOS alerts with an active inReach subscription.

Availability

The new Garmin Edge 1040 Solar and Edge 1040 are available for purchase now at Gamin.com and Garmin global retail partners. 

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Joenomad
Joenomad
16 days ago

At theses prices, the 1040s should include LTE, since these have become as expensive as many top smartphones.

sam zam
sam zam
16 days ago
Reply to  Joenomad

you are right! and they don’t last software glitches..

OriginalCim
OriginalCim
16 days ago

Serious question: why buy this over a small smartphone? For example, the iPhone 12 mini is $599, also weighs 135g, and is a similar size. A phone will have much better screen, there are plenty of route planning and tracking options, and there are plenty of HR/power/cadence sensors with bluetooth that connect to the phone. Plus, you probably have an old smartphone laying around you could use as a dedicated cycling computer… or just use your regular phone if you don’t mind risking damage.

I have a cycling computer because it’s small and relatively cheap. But this is neither. Help me understand.

Robert
Robert
16 days ago
Reply to  OriginalCim

A standalone GPS unit like this, or even a lower cost model like the Wahoo Bolt functions better as a computer…. the phone simply isnt designed for the abuse these cycling computers go thru. for example, if you run the phone in the direct sunlight, it will overheat, and stop everything, posting a message along the lines of “too hot to operate.” (iphone 12 mini user here)

you also get like 15+ hours per charge of run time with cycling computers… as opposed to 2~3 hours actively running GPS on the phone…

also, I personally prefer buttons to toggle screens over touch (Wahoo user here), because of sweat. when sweat drips on the screen it does funky things, as opposed to still being able just press a button and continuing to use the computer.

simply I find that the bike comouter just does cycling things “better” because it’s a dedicated unit.

lastly the screen… I would debate “better” because as an Iphone 12 mini user, I still find it rather difficult to read the screen in direct sunlight… the screen type of the GPS units make the print pop out really well even in sunlight making it very easy to read… think about how the kindle you can read in the sun no problem, and it’s easier on the eyes (not exactly that screen tech, but kinda like that)….

all that being said…. will I personally pay for a high end bike computer for $750? NO. I use the Wahoo Elmnt Bolt (have had both 1 and 2)… and have been very happy with both. if you want a simple but FANTASTIC unit the bolt 1 you can find on sale for like $175, which is a fantastic deal. i like how it’s small, outa the way, but you can read it no problem. bolt 2 is a little nicer, and color but personally still a fan of Bolt 1….

oh that’s the other thing… you can hook these wahoo/garmin up to the garmin Varia radar unit….. that’s a priceless piece of technology, and it’s worth every single damn penny and then some.

Derik
Derik
16 days ago
Reply to  Robert

Phones last for days running as a GPS, you just need to enable airplane mode

Robert
Robert
16 days ago
Reply to  Derik

That’s great and all, but I still need my phone to continue doing phone things like show my location to my family if for some reason I’m incapacitated or emergencies that I need to be notified of.

I can leave it on, toss it in my pocket, and it’ll go all day, my wahoo will display my metics all day as well. That being said, I personally have zero need to spend $750 on a computer.

whatever
whatever
15 days ago
Reply to  Robert

I get many hours out of my phone with Strava running in the background, I also use a third party app to show my family my location. To be fair I don’t have the screen on most of the time, but I don’t need to. Most of the time you aren’t at a branch point where you need to follow a route in an unfamilar location. Lastly, I have repeatedly that Garmins almost always SIGNIFICANTLY under report distance. Distance verified by other means. Fo0r example a well know local 8 mile loop, that is KNOWN TO BE 8 MILES. Strava on my phone gave me 8 miles, my buddies I rode with Garmin said 6.8 miles. It was one of the upper end Garmins. Have seen similar several times. I don’t know the reason. Lacking of sampling rate, lack of proper fix, software… idk. Just know my experience has been consistently bad with them.

Jon
Jon
9 days ago
Reply to  Robert

Robert, did you get that the op was suggesting you used a second mobile as your cycle computer – not the device you are currently using as your mobile phone? Two separate devices, the only question is whether that second device is a bespoke cycle-computer or a cheaper (or even free) second phone. Noone is suggesting your mobile does double-duty. So arguments about compromising your emergency comms lifeline are off the mark.

Speed565
Speed565
15 days ago
Reply to  Derik

How long will it run with screen and backlight turn on plus some maps on screen? My old Edge 1000 can easily run for 8-9 hours with all this. With some power saving options probably I can get 1-2 hours more.

Ben
Ben
13 hours ago
Reply to  Derik

No they don’t. Their entertainment focused screen and myriad of background apps and processes, many of which you have no control over will drain an equivalent battery far more quickly than a dedicated nav device. You do realise just how inefficient Google and Apples “free” applications are right? Especially as they are trying to make money from your information in the background

Barbara
Barbara
14 days ago
Reply to  OriginalCim

it’s the GPS/Emergency/maps function, Garmin works off of satellites and most smartphones work off of towers. after a couple of friends took what they thought was a shortcut and did not have a phone signal, it took them a bit to backtrack to get themselves out of the middle of nowhere, we then invested in the orange Garmin mini’s as well as no more shortcuts conversations. Here in Tucson lots of hikers use gamins, too easy to get lost or into trouble in the heat, help is just a button away. One can also share their movements with someone else. My son is a runner and cyclist and he now has a Garmin watch that doubles for his phone as well, He solos a lot and shares his location throughout so if something happens we have a starting point.

Ben
Ben
13 hours ago
Reply to  OriginalCim

Simple: Battery and Waterproofing.